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Found 64 results

  1. Animal or Vegetable?

    This is a rock shop purchase. The owner is an expert in dinosaur gembone from the Morrison. He also deals in Hermanophyton ferns, etc so he also knows a bit about paleobotany. But this piece was a mystery to him. Its very well agatized and the fine details are preserved. At first it looks like a limb cast. The exterior is coarsely wrinkled, like bark. The cross-section does not preserve a convincing ring of a bark layer, but there is some kind of concentric character. It has some characteristics of a limb bone. The geometry and size fit that thought. But the rough exterior is a contradiction. The interior has some well developed cell structure, but its patchy. As I write this I am thinking maybe its a petrified root. Or maybe not. The first 2 photos are the same (could not delete) and are a cut and polished face. Last photo is an unpolished cut end. Its a fun one. Enjoy and I look forward to your comments.
  2. Here is some of my first 6 months of fossil collection ! ( some still in transit oversea ...) First of all I really enjoy spending time in this forum and I feel very lucky to be member of this forum ! some of my collection was ID by you guys Soooo...LET get started ! KEM KEM the mystery - My First Dinosaur fossil .... Abelisauridae tooth ! MY BEST theropod tooth in my collection ! My Mystery vertebra from Kem kem ... possible Theropod vertebra Sauropod tooth << Rebbachisaurus tooth from kem kem Another Abelisauridae tooth < I personally love the color of enamel > Little Carcharodontosauridae tooth from kem kem < quite nice enamel and I love that feeding damage on the tip !!>
  3. Back In Time: Fremont County farmer discovered multiple dinosaur fossils in Garden Park https://www.canoncitydailyrecord.com/2020/11/22/back-in-time-fremont-county-farmer-discovered-multiple-dinosaur-fossils-in-garden-park/ https://www.newsbreak.com/news/2107473763723/back-in-time-fremont-county-farmer-discovered-multiple-dinosaur-fossils-in-garden-park Carpenter, K., 2002. Guide to the major dinosaur sites near Cañon City, Colorado. Trilobite Tails, 19(3), pp.7-17. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/314891708_Guide_to_the_major_dinosaur_sites_near_Canon_City_Colorado https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kenneth_Carpenter3/2 Yours, Paul H.
  4. Found in New Mexico on private property, not far from Morrison Formation...Circled in red highlighter is what appears to be a talon...last photo is of the opposite side..
  5. Since I live so close to the famous Morrison Formation I thought I would start doing some research on what it's like to fossil collect in it because I'm seriously considering finding a way to gain access to some private land and do a little bit of collecting. I have heard it said once that the rock of the Morrison is hard and requires special tools to dig in, and that consequently it's impossible to prospect for fossils in the Morrison the same way you would in, say, the Hell Creek Formation. How true is this? Is the only way to fossil collect in the Morrison to be in a quarry? My plan for gaining access to land to collect on is to simply ask landowners if I may fossil collect their in the same way that a hunter might ask a land owner if they can hunt on someone's land. I understand that the more committed of us fossil collectors will do this to gain access to collecting sites, but is there any reason why I should avoid this approach regarding collecting on the Morrison? Thanks for any information anyone has.
  6. Is possible a diplodocus tooth from the market, to belong to genera like Seismosaurus (yes i know, Seismosaurus now is the Diplodocus hallorum), Amphicoelias, Supersaurus or other diplodocid largest and more "exotic" than the common Diplodocus?
  7. Hi all, I have 3 teeth here I need help with The first is a Stegosaurus tooth: It comes from Wyoming, USA. Morrison Formation. It looks like a Stego tooth to me in terms of size and morphology, based off this thread > --- Next, a supposed Barosaurus tooth: It comes from Sundance, Wyoming. Morrison Formation. I cannot find any good literature on Barosaurus teeth. This tooth doesn't seem to have the spade-like shape I usually associate with Camarasaurus teeth. --- Lastly, there is a sauropod tooth from the Cloverly Formation: It comes from Montana, USA. Cloverly Formation. I presume it is a Titanosauriform indet. based off these two papers: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/254315252_The_Beginning_of_the_Sauropod_Dinosaur_Hiatus_in_North_America_Insights_from_the_Lower_Cretaceous_Cloverly_Formation_of_Wyoming https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236886285_Vertebrate_Paleontology_of_the_Cloverly_Formation_Lower_Cretaceous_I_Faunal_Composition_Biogeographic_Relationships_and_Sampling Can I have your thoughts on these 3 teeth? Thank you. - Andy
  8. Stegosaurus Tooth?

    I acquired this tooth some years ago, and it was labeled as a stegosaurus tooth. However, I am having some difficulties distinguishing if it indeed comes from a stegosaurus or perhaps an ankylosaur or nodosaur. It comes from the Morrison Formation of Wyoming. Each tick mark on the last pic is a mm. What do you all think? Thanks!
  9. I took these photos of a replica of the Allosaurus jimmadseni specimen "Big Al 2" at the Lewis Science Center in Orange Coast College earlier this year. Like the referred A. jimmadseni specimen "Big Al", it was excavated at Howe Quarry in Wyoming in the 1990s.
  10. Morrison Formation yields remains of predatory insect. Utah State Parks Blog, Vernal, Utah https://stateparks.utah.gov/2020/05/20/famous-dinosaur-producing-rocks-in-utah-yield-fossil-of-large-predatory-insect/ Jurassic bug: Researchers find 151-million-year-old Morrisonnepa Jurassica insect fossil in Utah by Jordan Culver, USA TODAY, May 22, 2020 https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/05/21/morrisonnepa-jurassica-151-million-year-old-bug-fossil-utah/5234187002/ the paper is: Lara, M.B., Foster, J.R., Kirkland, J.I. and Howells, T.F., 2020. First fossil true water bugs (Heteroptera, Nepomorpha) from Upper Jurassic strata of North America (Morrison Formation, southeastern Utah). Historical Biology, pp.1-9. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08912963.2020.1755283 Yours, Paul H.
  11. Foster, J., Pagnac, D. and Hunt-Foster, R., 2020. An unusually diverse northern biota from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic), Black Hills, Wyoming. Geology of the Intermountain West, 7, pp.29-67. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31711/giw.v7.pp29-67 https://giw.utahgeology.org/giw/index.php/GIW/article/view/69 PDF: https://giw.utahgeology.org/giw/index.php/GIW/article/view/69/87 Yours, Paul H.
  12. Dinosaur Bone

    My family owned private land near garden park in Canon City, Colorado. This is a couple of pieces that were found there. I'm just curious on what body part they may be.
  13. There is a revised edition of John Foster's book Jurassic West: The Dinosaurs of the Morrison Formation and Their World coming out this fall: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0253051576/ref=crt_ewc_title_dp_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER When this volume is released, it will include updates to knowledge of Morrison tetrapods, including the renaming of Amphicoelias fragillimus as Maraapunisaurus, the renaming of Stegosaurus longispinus as Alcovasaurus, the renaming of Diplodocus hayi as Galeamopus, the reclassification of Diablophis as a basal snake, the renaming of the DNM Camptosaurus as Uteodon, and the erection of Dryosaurus elderae for the DNM Dryosaurus.
  14. An interesting article that discusses the “Golden Age” of sauropods, the Morrison Formation is reported to have yielded 13 genera and 24 species of sauropods. For collectors makes identification of teeth a pretty daunting task... Paper. https://giw.utahgeology.org/giw/index.php/GIW/article/view/42
  15. Hi, I saw this tooth for sale and i am wondering if it looks like it could be a Ceratosaurus tooth. I read something about Ceratosaurus teeth having vertical ridges on the inner crown so i think it could possibly be a good match. It is .75 inches long and comes from the Morrison Formation in Wyoming. Thanks.
  16. I have found this crinoid ossicle from the Morrison Formation seems to be agatized alot like the bone from the formation does anyone know of any others found from the Morrison? have looked online but cant find anything even articles talking about it.
  17. I have researched for a while now on these bones i have in my collection and only thing i can find that is pretty close to what i have are sauropod metatarsals. Can anybody maybe confirm this or what they may be from? The 3D models are very accurate i put the measurements on the 3d models just click on the annotations. They are from the morrison formation here in Colorado, thanks to anybody that can help! 1st bone: 2nd bone:
  18. Hi I found this and was wondering if the ID was right. Just trying to improve my knowledge on fossils. It doesn’t look Theropod in origin, considering it doesn’t have the honeycomb texture of a Theropod fossil, Thank you!!
  19. A very long time coming, over a decade in discussion, Allosaurus jimmadseni has finally been described in the attached OPEN paper The abstract says it best "Allosaurus is one of the best known theropod dinosaurs from the Jurassic and a crucial taxon in phylogenetic analyses. On the basis of an in-depth, firsthand study of the bulk of Allosaurus specimens housed in North American institutions, we describe here a new theropod dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Western North America, Allosaurus jimmadseni sp. nov., based upon a remarkably complete articulated skeleton and skull and a second specimen with an articulated skull and associated skeleton. " https://peerj.com/articles/7803/ National Park Service article https://www.nps.gov/dino/learn/nature/allosaurus-jimmadseni.htm Article https://phys.org/news/2020-01-species-allosaurus-utah.html Collectors For those of us that collect teeth I'm sure that these teeth are indistinguishable from other Allosaurus species like Allosaurus fragilis and all teeth should all be identified as Allosaurus sp. including bones. Also please do not get taken by sellers claiming to offer Allosaurus jimmadseni teeth. Unless one comes off an identifiable skull its bogus.
  20. Allosaurus

    So this tooth i have was labeled by the seller as an Allosaurus premax tooth. The tooth is still in the matrix and the tip of it has broken off. The tooth measures 15/16 " long and is from the morrison formation ( bone cabin quarry ) in wyoming.
  21. Quick guide to help identify a few Sauropod teeth from the Morrison Formation. Corrections and additional info always appreciated Please Note: Variations in the morphology of these teeth can vary significantly do to, species, jaw position and ontogenetic changes. This is just a high level guide. Camarasaurus: - Crown is wider than the root - Anterior Teeth are spoon-like and symmetrical, mid and posterior teeth are asymmetrical - The crown enamel ends sharply where the root begins - Wear facet, if present, can be on both sides of the tip From my collection 14.5 cm long and 7 cm long Jaw mechanics showing wear facets Brachiosaurus - Crown are only slightly wider or equal to their root - Teeth are intermediate between spoon-like and peg-like depending on jaw position - The crowns typically have an axial twist relative to the root - Crowns are Conical and Chisel-Shaped - Wear facet, if present, is sharp and at the tip but almost always pointed - The crown enamel blends into the root area. Not has sharp of a cutoff as Camarasaurus From my collection 9.5 cm long From the collection of @hxmendoza from a previous post Jaw mechanics showing wear faceting Diplodocus - Peg-like teeth long and narrow - Slightly curved teeth - Crown enamel blends slightly into the root Jaw Mechanics of Diplodocus showing wear faceting From Supplier, Paleo Gallery Apatosaurus Dont have much published on teeth but from examining ones in my collection they appear to be faceted, grooved toward the base some more than others with sharper edges. More compressed than Diplo. Provided by hxmendoza on a previous post, he made similar comments From Paleo Gallery you can see the faceting References 1) Tooth Replacement of Euhelopus zdanskyi (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) and the Evolution of Titanosaurian Tooth Morphology, Sept 2014 Salakka, Seela 2) Jaw mechanics in sauropod dinosaurs, Jan 1994 Jorge Calvo 3)The dentition of a well-preserved specimen of Camarasaurus sp .: implications for function, tooth replacement, soft part reconstruction, and food intake. NOV 2016 Kayleigh Wiersma P. Martin Sander @Masp hope this helps
  22. What Fossils Alone Can’t Explain About Dinosaurs When time is measured in 10-million-year blocks, the lines between ecosystems and animals that would never have coexisted can get blurry. Laura Poppick, The Atlantic, August 17, 2019 https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/08/paleontology-precision-problem/596176/ Yours, Paul H.
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