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Found 30 results

  1. Leptaena

    I collected this Leptaena brachiopod from the red brown mudstone resting three feet above the top of the first out crop of breccia limestone. The location is above the rest-stop on highway 89 S before Riceville Rd. The formation is the lower part of the Kibbey. Leptaena Brachiopods dominate along with three types of bryozoa and crinoids. Also found clams and a part of a plant fossil. The setting was once a lagoon.
  2. Hi everyone! For the last few months I have been finding lots of fossil imprints in mixed chert cobble on a artist residency/farm in Kingsbury, Texas near Seguin (in Guadeloupe county). They are digging up some of the cobble/gravel to line the roads and walkways on the farm, which means that everything gets spread out nicely! Plus there is the 'quarry' itself. The USGS map says that the area is Wilcox Group, undivided, and/or Willis Formation, and I am looking at mudstone, chert, a little bit of sandstone, gravel, some petrified wood. In terms of age I think it matches up with Eocene but could go back a little farther, especially since some stuff may have been deposited by a nearby creek. For Wilcox Group USGS says AGE_MINPhanerozoic - Cenozoic - Tertiary-Paleogene - Early-Eocene AGE_MAXPhanerozoic - Cenozoic - Tertiary-Paleogene - Late-Paleocene. I am using the two classic Texas references to ID general fossil type, Matthew's Texas Fossils and also Finsley's A Field Guide to Fossils of Texas, and also deeply perusing thefossilforum.com site. I think the below is a stromatolite, then the rest are pelecypod impressions of various types. Except for that last photo in this post, I am guessing that is just a sideways cross section. I am curious as to your opinions... it has been really fun to look and to find these! I will add more images in subsequent posts.
  3. creek find 3

    Arundel Formation. Maryland. Lower Cretaceous. What say you?
  4. Creek 2

    Thoughts on this?
  5. Pseudo or other?

    I have been looking at this and can't decide if it's something or not. I leave it to the experts. Personally I thought concretion until I saw the belt. It looks like a squashed acorn, but I don't believe there were oaks in Lower Cretaceous. Thoughts? No, it's not a human artifact.
  6. NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Chemical Building Blocks For Life On Mars, Morning Edition, June 7, 2018 https://www.npr.org/2018/06/07/617235884/nasas-curiosity-rover-finds-chemical-building-blocks-for-life-on-mars NASA finds ancient organic material, mysterious methane on Mars, June 7, 2018 by Sean Potter, NASA https://phys.org/news/2018-06-nasa-ancient-material-mysterious-methane.html https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7154 The abstract is at: Eigenbrode, J.E., Summons, R.E., Steele, A., Freissinet, C., Millan, M., and many others, 2018, Organic matter preserved in 3-billion-year-old mudstones at Gale crater, Mars. Science. Vol. 360, Issue 6393, pp. 1096-1101 DOI: 10.1126/science.aas9185 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6393/1096 Yours, Paul H.
  7. Fossil rich matrix

    Just a post to show what this garden patch is made of. This is a typical bucket full of chunks turned up by the plow last year. This patch will be finally tilled this year and seeded over. (might come back later, tho) I guess this is called mudstone as it is just a solid glob of fossils. Here are some pics of one of the chunks before, and after splitting. Very busy in there and quite difficult to get it to split where you want, partly due to being exposed (partially) for a year. Working on the new plow, hope to bust up a new patch in the coming week. Regards.
  8. New air-abrasive set up

    Hi guys, a friend of mine is setting up a little prep workshop for us to use and asked me to find out about what sort of gritscan be used (we'll mainly be prepping teeth, scales bones etc. from a relatively soft mudstone), I know nothing about air -abrasion so was wondering if anyone could give me any advice, any help would be greatly appreciated! Sam
  9. Peace River Plant Impression?

    A friend and I went out on the Peace River yesterday. The river is the lowest I've seen...32" below normal, so much of the bank was exposed. In the area we were hunting, I decided to check out the mudstone bank...located between layers of limestone, and in separating a layer, I came the smaller impressions below. It looks so plant like to me: reminds me of the edges of hydrilla, but am so unsure what it could be. I included a close up so the finely tapered ends would show, as well as the somewhat ovoid edge impressions. I was excited, but I also know looks are deceiving. ( when I was first looking for fossils, I found a complete miniature leopard impression in a rock shown below) ...lol. but now, while I am beyond that, I am still a sucker for my eyes and mind want to be there. At any rate, I did check geology of the area, and we were in the Hawthorn group, probably , Arcadia formation, which does apparently contain mudstone, and plant fossils. Anyone care to hazard a guess, or perhaps you know for sure what the impressions are. So as to not waste anyone's time, I am trying to treat you with a couple of nice glyptodont pieces I found. My best pieces of the day, though my friend found a gorgeous unbroken 6"vertebra from something he has yet to identify. Sorry I don't have an image of that. Btw, the day was beautiful, water was crystal clear, and I got a workout dragging my kayak.
  10. Hi, Bit of a geological question here, I recently took this photo of some of the Upper Hamstead Member strata exposed on a headland at Bouldnor Cliff whilst out collecting. I really like this spot as the colour variation in the beds is really interesting. I've heard that the colour mottling in mudstones such as these can be indicative of the paleo-environmental conditions they were deposited in. Generally speaking these muds were deposited in ponds, lakes, and sluggish waterways on a low lying coastal plain. However, would it be correct to presume the redder areas indicate more arid conditions i.e. a period when the Hampshire Basin coastal plain was very dry and the other green and grey beds periods in which the environment on the plain was wetter? Thank you, Theo
  11. Bivalve with foot?

    Sorry for the shadow/light. The whole fossil is about an inch long. Is that the foot sticking out at top left? Or do you think it's just that the rest of the shell was broken off and never became part of the fossil? It's very soft mudstone (can scratch it with my fingernail), but I know soft parts don't tend to get preserved. This is another beach fossil, so I don't know anything about the age.
  12. Trace fossil or jellyfish

    Hi, I'd appreciate some help with this one, it's got me completely foxed and I can't find anything similar online. The matrix is a mudstone, it was a loose rock in a stream, the rocks in the area are all Brigantian (Upper Visean) - Carboniferous Cyclothem deposits (Northumberland, UK). There were 3 of these, all about an inch long, oval shaped, but fairly irregular, with faint radial lines/corrugations from a central 'spine'. They are three dimensional about a quarter of an inch thick. Small spiriferid brachiopod shell fragments in the same rock are undeformed, so I think the irregular shape is original. They remind me of small jellyfish but I think that's highly unlikely to have fossilised so I'm guessing some sort of trace fossil. All three are similar in shape and size so I'm wondering if there's a specific name for these, and whether it's known sort of creature made them? Cheers Steve
  13. Hi everyone! I was playing around with some matrix fragments from the phosphate deposits of Morocco and decided to give it a dip in water to see what would happen. What surprised me is how quickly the pieces crumbled into tiny clumps. Practically 80% of the matrix was gone in less than 10 seconds, dissolved by the water. I could very well have picked up a piece from dried mud and it would give similar results. I always thought the Moroccan stuff was a kind of sandstone, but what I saw suggests it is more of a clay-type rock? Then again, can the matrix even be considered a rock given how "fragile" it is? Would love to hear your thoughts! Jay
  14. I went to visit my family south of Rochester, NY a couple of weeks ago. They own property which includes a creek emptying into Canandaigua Lake. Here are some pics and finds. There are public sites very close with similar fauna, including Green's Landing, and Barnes' Gully/Onanda Park. Eldredgeops Rana strophomenid Amboecoelia umbonata strophemenid brachiopod (not concava--its a flat one)
  15. Canandaigua death assemblage

    From the album Canandaigua trilobites

    Lots of trilobite parts, a few mediospirifer sp's. Very busy. Fragile mudstone, difficult to split or remove matrix without destroying specimens.
  16. Miocene marine insect?

    Is this an insect? Marine spider?
  17. Need opinions

    Found this piece of mudstone at a site that is new to me. Curious to know what could of made these indentations. Any suggestions would be great. Formation is Lockatong, area is west central New Jersey .
  18. #43

    From the album Complete thin section images

    Mudstone- Orbitolina
  19. #9

    From the album Complete thin section images

    Mudstone
  20. #6

    From the album Complete thin section images

    Mudstone
  21. #3 (9)

    From the album Thin sections

    Mudstone
  22. #3 (8)

    From the album Thin sections

    Mudstone
  23. #3 (7)

    From the album Thin sections

    Mudstone
  24. #3 (6)

    From the album Thin sections

    Mudstone
  25. #3 (5)

    From the album Thin sections

    Mudstone
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