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Found 84 results

  1. The Royal Tyrrell Museum

    I had recommended going through the Royal Tyrrell Museum to a friend from Kansas last year in September and he was very impressed (I wondered if it was just because he couldn't get out and golf in the snow). This year I went with my 9 year old Granddaughter who didn't sound like she wanted to go. Long story short, we spent a whole day there. I was sort of surprised when I heard they only have 1/2 of 1 percent of the the collection on display. I can only guess that they have a huge warehouse someplace with the rest of the collection catalogued and stored.
  2. Yearly Family Reunion

    We just arrived back from my wife's family reunion held in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. In the past, during such trips, my goal has always been to check out a few fossil spots while visiting kinfolk. This trip was no exception. Unfortunately, the weather was trying to be uncooperative so we visited a few museums and arboretums during some of our down time. The Delaware Museum of Natural History was average at best but was air conditioned!!! Just the right size for children (see the T Rex pic) but not truly stimulating for adults. Longwood Garden was our next stop. It , on the other hand, was absolutely WONDERFUL!!!! Beautiful landscapes, festive fireworks alternated with fountain displays at night. A strong recommendation to visit if in the area. My favorite area was the water gardens and some lovely pics have been added to the forum's "Nature Photography" post. Take a look if interested. Here is @snolly50's favorite. One more floral picture that I liked. Next on the itinerary was Sunnybrook Creek. Due to the heat, I thought a wade in the water would be nice. However, upon arrival, I found the creek to be dry!!! So my desire to cool off was shot down. I did spend about 30 minutes in the creek bed before it became uncomfortable. The creek has many minerals in it but botryoidal goethite is the common thing found.
  3. Hello everybody So this is another Museumreport from Germany. This time the famous Senckenberg Museum in Frankfurt. I would say this is one of the best Collections in Germany. One important note: They have a lot Cast Skeletons. I will lable every picture indicating if its a real fossil or "just" a cast. All Casts are copies of real fossils. I labled as many fossils with names as possible Enjoy Tyrannosaurus Rex Cast Triceratops horridus Cast Triceratops prorsus Real Supersaurus vivianae Cast Stegosaurus stenops Cast Iguanodon bernissartensis Cast Diplodocus longus Real (mounted skull is a cast, real skull at the bottom to see it better) Plateosaurus engelhardti Real Giraffatitan brancai Real (still labled in the museum as Brachiosaurus) Euoplocephalus tutus Cast Quetzalcoatlus northropi Cast Psittacosaurus mongoliensis Real Parasaurolophus walkeri Cast Archaeopteryx lithographica Real (a welcome suprise, I wasn't aware they got the real 11th Archaeopteryx) Edmontosaurus annectens Real (very impressive fossil, parts of the skin is still visible) Anhanguera santanae Real (there is a cast of the position it was found, but the single skull and bones on the right are the real ones) Some eggs Oviraptor is a cast Archaeopteryx lithographica and Compsognathus longipes both Cast (very nice modells) Rhamphorhynchus indet. Real Xiphactinus audax Real Tylosaurus proriger Real Varanus komodoensis and Platecarpus coryphaeus both Real Peloneustes philarchus Real Placodus gigas Real Cryptoclidus oxoniensis Cast Simosaurus gaillardoti Cast Metriorhynchus superciliosus Real Ophthalmosaurus icenicus Cast Temnodontosaurus trigonodon Real Sclerocephalus haeuseri Real Nothosaurus mirabilis Real Eurhinosaurus longirostris Real
  4. Why not let people know what to look for when they visit a country. There are for sure many "top ten dinosaur museums" lists on the web, but their sources' credibility raises doubts. I hope TFF members, having accumulated quite an expertise in the field, would separate the wheat from the chaff. Would be nice to see lists for countries or at least regions. Russia First of all, most museums hosting paleo exibitions are organised in the "local history museum" format - everything from minerals to folk costumes. But they sometimes do have good paleontological material. For example, Samara Alabin museum http://alabin.ru/sobytiya/prirodnaya-ekspozitsiya/ features a good Mezozoic marine hall (also trilos,mammals, etc). So if you are in a big city, why not visit the local history (краеведческий) museum - there's a chance to find a good collection. There's only a handful of dedicated paleontological museums. That's all I found: 1. Moscow: https://www.paleo.ru/museum/ The biggest one, spectacular collection, emphasis on Permian reptiles, Gobi dinosaurs and big mammal skeletons:) 2. Kazan: http://kazan-kremlin.ru/museums/muzej-estestvennoj-istorii-tatarstana/ Good collection, but much smaller. Nice Jurassic marine life hall. 3. Perm: http://museum.perm.ru/filiali/muzey-permskih-drevnostey Permian reptiles, etc. Looks good 4. Yakutsk: https://www.s-vfu.ru/universitet/rukovodstvo-i-struktura/vspomogatelnye-podrazdeleniya/muzei/detail.php?SECTION_ID=162&ID=13263 Mammoths and associated fauna 5. Moscow 2:http://www.darwinmuseum.ru/projects/constant-exp/razvitie-organicheskogo-mira?eng The museum concentrates on evolution concept, but (and that's why) features some good paleo material. Basically those are the museums I recommend. There are also others: 6. Kirov, Kotelnich (Kirov): http://suminia.com/ru/About_the_Museum.htm 7. Undory (Ulyanovsk): https://undor-muz.ru A small museum concentrated on Jurassic-Cretaceous marine life 8. Kammenomostsky (Adygea): http://worldroads.ru/muzey-ammonitov-adyigei Dedicated to ammos 9. Shestakovo (Kemerovo): http://brend.visit-kuzbass.ru/shestakovskii Not a museum in a proper sense, but some kind of tourist route around dinosaur excavation sites 10. Toliyatti (Samara): https://sites.google.com/site/ievbmuseum/nasi A closed museum for professional geo/paleontologists, visits by appointment 11. Perm 2: http://museum.psu.ru/museum/muzej-paleontologii-i-istoricheskoj-geologii/ by appointment, probably small 12. Volgograd: https://museionsajtyarkova.ru/katalog/katalog-muzeya-evolyuczionnoj-ekologii-i-arxeologii.html 13. Stary Oskol (Belgorod) https://www.ammonit.ru/text/2257.htm Museum of the local mining plant - marine reptiles, etc 14. Yekaterinburg: http://ugm.ursmu.ru Mostly geological 15. Nizhniye Chugli (Dagestan): https://www.ammonit.ru/text/1691.htm A small private ammo museum
  5. The Maasvlakte 2 museum

    Hi everyone, Last Thursday I had a school trip to the harbor of Rotterdam, the biggest harbor in Europe and 10th biggest in the world. We were specifically in the Maasvlakte 2 area, the newest addition to the harbor to accommodate larger ships and more containers. There's a small museum there which we visited. The intent of the trip was to discover more on how the harbor evolved to fit the needs of the world in the ever-growing globalization of the planet. However what no one else in the class knew (because no one else in the class is as crazy as we all are ) is that the sand used to make the artificial beach of the Maasvlakte 2 is full of fossils. Same story as for the Zandmotor (and many other fossil-containing beaches in the NL), the sand used to make the artificial beaches is extracted from the North Sea floor, which is very rich in fossils, especially of Pleistocene age. I was really hoping to be able to have some free time during the trip in order to go on the beach and hunt a little bit (I've already been there once, some 4-5 years ago), but that unfortunately didn't work out. Luckily in the small museum they had a section dedicated to the paleontology of the beach, and I had the pleasure to visit it. Big mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) tusk. This one is probably not from the beach itself but rather dredged from the North Sea. And here's a view of the small exhibition with a big mammoth hip and femur (I think they're casts though).
  6. Hi! I made a small visit to the Natural History Museum in Maastricht today to visit the new small exhibition named "Whale: Locality Maastricht" which centers around some Eocene whale bones from an undescribed whale found in the ENCI quarry in Maastricht. The exhibition explores further into the evolution of whales, it's a small exhibition but worth a visit if you haven't seen the museum or if you are really interested in whale evolution. Should any of our Dutch, Belgian & German members decide to visit (or international members who are in the area), then you should really grab a copy of the exhibition book. It is really cool and informative, it's only €2,50 but 125 pages long (both in dutch & english) and it covers the evolution of whales, the ENCI whale, modern whales & their biology and about whaling and whales in human history & myth. The exhibition book alone is well worth the visit in my opinion, I kinda compare it with the EOS magazine about Iguanodons & the book "Mammoths: ice age giants by Adrian Lister" but then about whales. So here are the photo's I made of the exhibition. The Exhibition Room: left: Metepocetus sp. neurocranium with preserved ear bones from Liessel in the Netherlands (Miocene) Right: Isoluted vertebrae of various whale species from Liessel in the Netherlands (Miocene) Isolated vertebrae of Eocene primordial whales (Archaeoceti) dredged from the buttom of the North Sea, for comparison with those of the "ENCI whale" Isolated vertebrae of Eocene primordial whales (Archaeoceti) dredged from the buttom of the North Sea, for comparison with those of the "ENCI whale" Smallest jaw: possibly Dorudon sp. from the late Eocene of Ad Dakhla in Morocco. Bigger jaw: possibly Pappocetus lugardi, from the middle Eocene of Ben Gueran in Morocco.
  7. Do you guys know if there are any paleontological museums in Italy?
  8. ID 3 species in a Permian themed exhibit

    I just went to this traveling exhibit in a museum in a city where my brother lives that it is about the animals and life in the Permian period and I got pictures of 3 fossils, an ammonite, a trilobite and a crinoid but I don’t know what species and genus they are?
  9. I just visited Field Museum in Chicago for the Member’s Nights, and I made sure to take pictures to share! During Member’s Night you’re allowed into the bowels of the museum where non-displayed items are held, along with several fun and interesting mini-exhibit/activities/booths. On the third floor, many of the paleontology department were displaying their personal favorite fossils! These next few will be from there.
  10. Taiwan’s largest fossil park to open on Sunday By Wu Chun-fang and Jonathan Chin, Taipei times http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2019/05/09/2003714834 Yours, Paul H.
  11. Abstraktum's Museum

    Hello and a very warm well welcome to my little museum So the time has finally come and I can show what I got. A friend of mine, who is a professional photographer, took some very nice pictures and I would like to share them now with all of you Let's go: First my two Megalodon tooth: 5.64 in with very nice serrations 5.3 in no serrations present on this tooth Spinosaurid teeth from KemKem The first one is rather big with 5.5 inches, but I'm aware this is a composite. Sooner or later I will work on this tooth with Acetone. This one is at 3.15 in, but also some glue present My smallest Spino tooth at 3.3 in, but also the best looking without bad restoration A Mosasaur tooth from Morocco at 2.55 in Another Mosasaur tooth from Morocco. Rooted with broken crown (whole tooth with root is 4.6 in) This one is described as a rooted Elosuchus cherifiensis tooth from KemKem at 3.07 in Root is glued back together, but I think it's rather well done. The pieces fit and I don't think this is a composite Not sure about the ID however. If someone got more information, please let me know I would say it's croc, but not sure about the species. Well this tooth is familiar to some It'S my reconstructed Carcharodontosaurid tooth from this topic: Length is 2.48 in A nice Otodus obliquus tooth from Morocco at 3.5 in (big boy) Next from KemKem is a Onchopristis numidus rostral barb at 1.57 in Two Abelisaurid teeth from KemKem Ornithocheirid tooth from KemKem Something different A Pteranodon indet. bone from Niobara Formation, Logan County, Kansas, USA And a Diplomystus dentatus from Green River An Afrovenator abakensis tooth from Tiourarén Formation in Niger. Yes it's one of this special lot the goes around TFF for some time now. Nanotyrannus lancensis form Hell Creek. One repaired crack, 1.05 in A very nice Mako tooth from Temblor Formation California (thx @caldigger )
  12. Here are two fossils which I have recently donated to the Natural History Museum in London. The first is a Rhinocephalus planiceps skull from the Eocene London clay of the Isle of Sheppey, the second is a Triassic Archosaur tooth from Wales.
  13. Hey friends, Hope you're all well. I recently went to New York for the first time and throughly enjoyed what the city had to offer, however one of the stand out days was definitely a trip to the American Museum of Natural History. I won't bombard you with thousands of picture but I will post a few of my favourites Also a question, annoyingly I was on limited time and wasn't able to make the last slot of the "Meet T-Rex: The Ultimate Predator", has anybody done the tour and is it worth doing? I was gutted I missed it and would like to hear what others thought of it. I'm sure most of you know the I.Ds but i'll list a few of them just incase. So here's a few pics from my journey This specimen is AMNH 5027 and it was excavated in 1908 by Barnum Brown in Montana. Interestingly enough this specimen also provided the first complete skull of Tyrannosaurus rex. Not an alien, a pano that went a little wrong, it's hard to fit these guys in.
  14. This Sunday (4/14) is the opening day of the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor Natural History Museum. I'll be going at 8:45 AM which is when the ribbon will be cut. It looks like it's going to have some great exhibits. Hope some of you can make it, but if not, I'll make sure to post some pictures.
  15. Would anyone happen to have contact info for anyone in the fossil field at the Smithsonian/Museum of Natural History? Actually, any museum, or "official"(?) expert of the field--Prehistoric whales/Cetus. Ive tried contacting anyone from the smithsonian website contact form, and through email, but haven't had any luck yet. I know they would be very busy, but as my attempts have only gone to the most general direction, I'm thinking that if the messages even end up getting to the correct people at all, they may not even get the messages for some time.
  16. Dinopark Altmühltal

    Hello everybody So today I decided zu visit the Dinopark Altmühltal in the Center of Bavaria / South Germany. Info: CLICK Let us see what we've got here. Lot of pictures. I will have to do multiple posts One of the most interessting fossils there is Rocky, a young Tyrannosaurus Rex. I previously showed Rocky here: Then we have this monstrosity:
  17. Whale vertebra?

    I was in a Texas museum yesterday and was looking at a case of primarily pleistocene fossils. This vertebrae was labeled mastodon, but really doesn't look like any mastodon vertebrae that I've seen. We don't generally find whale vertebrae where i look for fossils, but this hits me and I definitely don't know whale, as possibly whale? Vertical thickness is approximately 4-5 inches, 10-12cm. There is no other labeling other than mastodon. Sorry for the quality of the photos, dark lighting and a hand held camera.
  18. I attended DinoFest at the Natural History Museum of Utah this year. Once a year they open up the prep lab and their storage room to the public. While I took more photos then I could ever post, here are the highlights.
  19. Yesterday I made a visit to the Natural History Museum of Maastricht (The Netherlands) for my Birthday The museum is only a 40 minute drive from where I live and it showcases the entire natural history of the region, the cool thing about this museum is that the fossils which are showcased here are all regional fossils from The Netherlands, Germany & Belgium. I am starting the topic off with 2 pictures of the special exhibit called Microsculptures, which shows giant detailed photographs of insects to show how magnifecent they are. Then I went on to the "Mosaleum" which holds "Bér" the holotype specimen of Prognathodon saturator
  20. Greetings all! I recently took a trip to a museum in Kitakyushu Japan! This museum was huge, the museum is called the North Kyushu Municipal Journey Of Life Museum and it’s address is: 2 Chome-4-1 Higashida, Yahatahigashi-ku, Kitakyūshū-shi, Fukuoka-ken 805-0071, Japan.
  21. Dear Canadian Fossil Collectors, Some of you may have heard that the ROM is finally going to open an invertebrate gallery, something that has been sadly missing for many years. There was a recent announcement of a $5 million (Canadian I assume) donation for this project. https://www.rom.on.ca/en/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/royal-ontario-museum-receives-landmark-5-million-gift-to-establish This is a great move on the part of the ROM. Jean-Bernard Caron has contacted me regarding the new exhibition. We have communicated both by email and phone. It seems that they are in desperate need of "spectacular" Ontario specimen for the exhibit. They probably contacted me because of my web site and in general people are aware of my "Ontario" collection, both Arkona and Brechin. It is very unfortunate that they (ROM) have no relationship with Canadian collectors or any other collectors for that matter. Jean and I spoke about this problem at length because at this point no one is willing to donate anything. We spoke about my Brechin crinoid collection and how it is going to an American institution simply because someone at the ROM told me that there was no one at the ROM interested and I should find someone somewhere else. We also spoke of a Arkona crinoid collection I personally gave them over 30 years ago and how it is still sitting in the same boxes under a table. No one bothered to accession it. And finally we spoke of a recent find by a Canadian collector of a very rare fish from Arkona. An American wanted to work on it, had no problem with it being deposited at the ROM and even made arrangements for the ROM to contact the collector. The collector sat at his phone for weeks waiting for the ROM to call. The specimen ended up being donated to an American Institution. I made it very clear to Jean that his problem is the historic relationship with the collecting public and more importantly the total lack of interest in working on ONTARIO projects. For being called the "Royal Ontario" all of the work is outside of Ontario. Jean has recognized this as a problem and is willing to work on repairing the relationship and maybe getting some Ontario projects going. I think that Jean is sincere in his statements and would really like a better relationship with the collecting public. I have agreed to donate some specimens but I am not going to fill the entire "Ontario" exhibit. The purpose of this post is to encourage Canadians, and other collectors to contact Dr. Caron and to start a relationship with the museum. And of course he is looking for Canadians to make donations to the exhibit. What exactly he needs is a very open question. I personally will be visiting sometime in the new year to see exactly what is needed and go from there. Maybe you can do the same. His contact information is below. Dr. Jean-Bernard Caron Richard M. Ivey Curator of Invertebrate Palaeontology Department of Natural History Royal Ontario Museum 100 Queen's Park Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2C6 CANADA Tel: 416-586-5593#1 Fax: 416-586-5553 E-mail: jcaron@rom.on.ca<mailto:jcaron@rom.on.ca>
  22. As some might have read in a previous topic, I went to visit my girlfriend in Finland. Unfortunatly Finland must be one of the worst places to find fossils in the world, I did manage to find some quartz vains and a few pieces that may or may not be amber (have to do the hot needle test on them first) Even urban fossil hunting is near impossible as pretty much all buildings are made from the fossil-lacking stones that can be found in Finland. The only urban fossils I found was in the Burger King in the Helsinki Central Station, the floor was littered with orthocones there. But Finland really isn't a good place to hunt fossils. But one thing that definitly is a worth a visit is the Finnish Museum of Natural History! It isn't a really big museum, the collection isn't that big, but the way it is presented is very awesome! One of the few musea that nails being modern and educative at the same time without overdoing it. Especially the Taxidermy diorama's were done amazingly. But I will ofcourse start this topic with what I think will interest you guys the most, the Paleontology part of the museum. A mural with Pikaia, Opabinia & Hallucigenia models Trilobites, most of which were found in Aland (Finland), Gotland (Sweden) and other neighboring countries of Finland Trilobites, most of which were found in Aland (Finland), Gotland (Sweden) and other neighboring countries of Finland Orthocone models Graptolites Eurypterid found in Saarermaa in Estonia (Silurian age) Eurypterid model Giant orthocone model
  23. Discovering new species

    Out of curiosity, is it a practice for people to contact museums about fossils that can't be/can't quite be identified? I was just thinking about how many new unknown species must be just sitting around in individual's collections. They find new species all the time that are sitting in the museums collection, so imagine how many are of things that no museum has ever even taken a cursory look at. I don't mean like sending pictures of every vertebrae you can't pin to a specific species, even though that's more than enough in some cases, but at least with the less usual stuff, even though I'm sure there are plenty of individual teeth or single vertebrae of undiscovered species in individual collections. I saw an amazing full Devonian "shark" for sale, and that's what got me thinking. It would be nice if it were realistically possible to let museums just browse through collections, just in case. I know that once a fossil is out of context it loses significant useful information, but there'd still be potentially lots to gain from even those.
  24. Founded in 1818 and housing over 20 million items, the National Museum of Brazil caught fire today and may be a total loss. Does anyone know specifics about their paleontology collections? I imagine the mineral collections included priceless specimens... http://news.trust.org//item/20180903001032-p13t9/
  25. Hi, Here i am in sunny, mostly, Bournemouth UK. I hate to say it but I am doing the tourist thing this week. Please somebody save me and take me Barton. . Just round the Corner from the hotel there is a small museum packed with fossils and some minerals on the lower floor. Here is the url http://bnss.org.uk. Wonderful volunteer showed me the collections and besides what is in the cabinets there are drawers filled to the brim. As it is a charity and only open to the public on Tuesday's, more often over the holidays, donations are very welcome. I have photos to share but need to get home first to download. Loads of Barton stuff. They have other galleries such as Archaeology, Egyptology, real mummy in a sarcophagus. Stuffed animals etc. Watch this space.
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