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Found 5 results

  1. For years I’ve had my macro fossils in drawers and my micro fossils in gem jar displays. Recently I’ve started putting some of my macro fossils in 8”X12” Riker mounts. Below are the Riker mounts that I now have. I’ll probably put together at least twenty of these. Below are two Riker mount displays with specimens from the Paleocene Aquia Formation from the Potomac River in the Liverpool Point, Maryland area. This display contains in the top crocodile vertebrae, a couple of crocodile leg bones, and two crocodile coprolites. I have larger crocodile vertebrae but they are too large for these Riker mount displays. Then a row of crocodile teeth (for size reference the largest partially rooted tooth is 2”). I have over 200 crocodile teeth from the area but the vast majority are fairly small. Then on the bottom there are turtle shell pieces and a crocodile scute. This display contains in the top ray dental plates and a ray barb. I have a lot of very nice very small ray dental plates but the larger ones tend to be damaged/beat up. Ray barbs are not really that common from the area. The middle has a few Otodus obliquus teeth and a partial vertebra. The day I found that partial vertebra, a person that I took to the site for the first time, found a complete, perfect one of the same size. For size reference, the anterior O. obliquus tooth is just less than 3”. I have over 700 O. obliquus teeth from the area but the vast majority are water worn and/or have damaged root lobes, cusplets, tips etc. I believe that these sharks ate a lot of turtles which took a toll on the teeth. At the bottom are a couple of chimaera mouth plates and a fin spine. I have at least 110 smaller chimaera mouth plates in my gem jar displays. The next two Riker mount displays contain specimens from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia. I posted one of these awhile back here on TFF but I’ve rearranged it as I’m now putting more of my specimens in Riker mounts. This display contains on top a few of the larger coprolites that I still have from the Nanjemoy Formation. I’ve already donated over 20,000 of these to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. I’ve accumulated another 30,000 since my last donation in 2015. Then there is a row of sand tiger teeth two inches and larger. Then there is a row with additional sand tiger teeth and two Otodus obliquus. O. obliquus are not common at all from the area. I’ve only found five in over 165 trips to various sites in the area. Then there are two sawfish rostral spines/teeth and a sawfish vertebra, and a ray mouthplate and medial tooth with several ray partial barbs. On the bottom are three associated fish vertebrae, a small fish jaw, fish spine, and then two fish teeth. This display is a work in progress. I’m putting some of my larger reptile specimens in it. The bottom rows have two turtle lower jaws, turtle shell and a turtle bone. I have lots of other turtle shell pieces so what’s in this display is only a representative sample of what I have collected from the area. The next row contains sea snake vertebrae. I have over 100 of these so I’ll add a few more to this display. My largest, 1.5“ thick won’t fit in this display. At the top are three rooted crocodile teeth, a partial crocodile scute and a small crocodile vertebra. At some point in the future I will post more of these Riker mounts as I finish them. I’m also thinking of putting together a number of artificial shark tooth dentitions and mounting them in Riker mount displays I have several hundred thousand shark teeth from the Nanjemoy so I should have most of the positions for a number of different shark dentitions. Marco Sr.
  2. Globidens alabamaensis?

    While collecting at a location in SE Virginia which produces a mixture of material from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation and late Miocene/early Pliocene Yorktown Formation, I was shocked to find what I believe to be a cretaceous Globidens sp. anterior tooth fragment. My only explanation for this would be that it must have been redeposited into the Eocene beds and finally exposed with rest of the material. The texture is classic Globidens. The only other species with a slightly similar texture found within these formations (though still markedly different), would be Squalodon sp., however if the tooth were more complete it would clearly prove to be hollow with a conical interior consistent with squamates like mosasaurs. The fragment is approximately 7/8" x 1/2". This is the first bit of possibly cretaceous material I have found from these exposures, so it would be quite interesting if the general consensus is a Globidens sp. Your thoughts would be much appreciated! Thanks, Ash
  3. Tooth Identification

    Hi Folks, I recently acquired a Sharkstooth from Charles County Maryland. I was told it was found North of the 301 bridge on the Potomac River. Anyway this area of Maryland I rarely collect so I picked up this 2.05” tooth on a trade. Just looking to confirm the Identification on this beauty of a tooth. Thanks Calvert Cliff Dweller
  4. Looking at trading my large collection of Eocene shark teeth, ray fossils, and fish fossils from the Nanjemoy Formation of Muddy Creek in Virginia. Looking to trade for rare species of shark teeth or shark teeth from rare locations. I have broken down what is included in the collection below and will post pictures of some of the highlights of the collection in the upcoming posts. All fossils are complete with no repair or restoration. Message me if interested. Here are a couple of links about the location: http://www.elasmo.com/frameMe.html?file=paleo/va/va_eoc.html&menu=bin/menu_fauna-alt.html https://www.dmme.virginia.gov/commercedocs/PUB_152.pdf Fossils included in the collection: Shark Material Striatolamia macrota - 100+ Anomotodon novus & Anomotodon sheppeyensis - 100+ Serratolamna lerichei - 50+ Hypotodus verticalis - 37x Carcharias sp. - 36x Sylvestrilamia teretidens - 22x Odontaspis winkleri - 25x Jaekelotodus robustus - 7x Palaeohypotodus rutoti - 1x Cretalamna appendiculata - 5x Isurolamna inflata - 4x Ginglymostoma sp. and Nebrius sp. - 23x Squatina prima - 19x Megasqualus orpiensis and Squalus crenatidens - 4x Premontria sp. - 17x Palaeogaleus vincenti - 17x Scyliorhinus gilberti - 13x Triakis wardi - 7x Physogaleus secundus - 50+ Pachygaleus lefevrei - 15x Galeorhinus ypresiensis - 5x Rhizoprionodon sp. - 32x Abdounia beaugei - 100+ Abdounia minutissima - 100+ Unidentified sp. - 4x Shark vertebra - 1x Ray Material Ray plate bars of various sp. - 100+ including one partial plate Ray teeth of various sp - 100+ Dermal denticles - 21x Stingray barb - 1x Fish Material Fish teeth of various species (including cutlass, barracuda, drum, others) - 100+ Various fish bones - 50+ Anoxypristis sp. - 1x Striatolamia macrota Anomotodon novus & Anomotodon sheppeyensis
  5. Yesterday I received a box of fossil matrix from fellow forum member Otodusobliquus and I couldn't stop myself from spending a few hours looking through it. The matrix is from the Aquia formation in Virginia and I believe it is composed primarily of marine material. But one of the first fossils I found appears to be a tiny rib done. When I asked Otodusobliquus if he had ever found mammal material in this particular matrix he said he hadn't. But he also mentioned that the overlaying Nanjemoy formation did include mammal material and it was possibility that something from that formation got mixed into the matrix he sent to me. This leads me to ask is what I found truly a rib bone? What creature it might it belong to? The scale is in mm and I apologize that the pictures aren't as crisp as they should be. On of these days I will find a way to take clear pictures of my tinier fossils.
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