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Found 56 results

  1. Partial T.rex tooth or Nanotyrannus?

    I bought this tooth last week, and it arrived today. I’m really excited about it, because it’s my biggest tyrannosaur tooth so far, and I believe it’s T.rex. It was found in the Hell Creek formation, but no other locality is given. I think it’s T-rex because of the base lacking any pinching, and the overall robustness, but I always like to hear any opinions others have. Thanks!
  2. Hi all, I posted this tooth for ID a while back. Conclusion was that it could be a Dakotaraptor, maybe, maybe. Since then I am going back and forth on the ID, basically on a daily basis So I decided to take more & new images, measure it thoroughly, put it up again, and kindly ask for your help. It was found in the Hell Creek Fm, Powder River Co., Montana. Measurements are: CH: 2.08cm CBL: 0.8cm CBW: 0.42cm Serration count per 5mm is mesial 24 and distal 18. What makes it hard for me to judge: the shape of denticles is between round and chisel (?), the tiny mesial denticles, and the position of the carinae. Lowest part of the mesial carina is sheared off, but I would not expect a twist - looking closely it would end either half way or 1/3 from base. Any help is highly appreciated!
  3. Hi I decided to make this since the new Tyrannosaur from Alberta’s Foremost Formation, Thanatotheristes deerootorum has just been named and described. Enjoy!! Tyrannosaur bearing Formations in Canada: Formations in Alberta but most of the Formations on my list are I Alberta anyway. Horseshoe Canyon Formation 74-68 million years ago, Alberta: Albertosaurus sarcophagus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. but no compelling evidence so far. Oldman Formation 78.2-77 million years ago, Alberta: Daspletosaurus torosus, Gorgosaurus sp. Foremost Formation 80.5-78.2 million years ago, Alberta: Thanatotheristes deerootorum, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Milk River Formation 84.5-83.4 million years ago, Alberta: Tyrannosaur. indet could be a species of Thanatotheristes, possibly Gorgosaurus sp. Scollard Formation 68-66 million years ago, Alberta: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Formations in British Columbia: Wapiti Formation 76.8-70 million years ago, Alberta, British Columbia: Unknown Albertosaurinae either Gorgosaurus or Albertosaurus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. Tumbler Ridge 135-74 million years ago, British Columbia: Tyrannosaur. indet Formations in Saskatchewan and Manitoba: Dinosaur Park Formation 77-75.5 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan: Daspletosaurus sp., Gorgosaurus libratus Frenchmen Formation, 68-66 million years ago, Saskatchewan: T. rex, possibly Nanotyrannus Bearpaw Formation 75-72 million years ago, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba: Daspletosaurus sp. one specimen from Daspletosaurus sp. that drowned. For now these are all the Tyrannosaurs known from Canada. No Eastern Tyrannosaurs in Canada yet either but maybe someday. I will also update this and add as more information comes available.
  4. Unidentified Theropod tooth

    Hey everyone i hope you all had a great holiday season....this next tooth in my collection was labled saurornitholestes from the hell creek formation from powder county MT. We know that the only two described raptors from there are dakotaraptor and acheroraptor so im curious to see what you all think of this one. Nanotyrannus perhaps? Unfortunately the anterior serrations have worn off which im sure will make id'ing this tooth difficult but anyway here it is. ....the CH is 9 mm the posterior serrations are 12 per 3 mm. @Troodon
  5. Nanotyrannus in Canada

    Hi the debate about Nanotyrannus got me thinking is Nanotyrannus found in Alberta Canada in the Scollard or Frenchmen Formations. If not then it could be valid since T-Rex is found there and if it’s a juvenile Rex then there should be a least some evidence for It there, since T-rex’s are found there. And if so this could provide Nanotyrannus’s range.
  6. Happy New Year Everyone Will start the New Year with something Tom Holtz posted and said "Quick and dirty plot of new Mesozoic dinosauromorph taxa named since 2003. No evaluation of legitimacy of taxa taken into account, but "grey literature" not included. Includes new species & new genera, but not placement of old species into previously named genera" Looks like 2019 was one of the best years for naming dinosaurs My first image is that of a claw you would not see on any Trex of any age its a Nannotyannus hand claw its 4" long from South Dakota I find this very interesting the NHM dino lab posted these images of "holotype" Sauropods from Argentina that are stored in hallways in their museum. WOW.. The holotype of Patagosaurus, Saltasaurus and a nice little Mussaurus skull, capturing about 130 million years of sauropodomorph evolution between them in the collections at PVL Now this is what we need from the Kem Kem...an Abelisaurid skull with teeth The abelisaurid Majungasaurus crenatissimus from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar! High-quality preservation courtesy of S. Gutherz Partial, juvenile hadrosaur dentary from the Liscomb Quarry of the North Slope of Alaska. Perot Museum More from the Perot Museum, Not the prettiest but this tyrannosaur tooth was found up against a Pachyrhinosaurus skull in the type locality of P. perotorum and the Arctic tyrannosaur Nanuqsaurus hoglundi. A very early ornithischian dinosaur Heterodontosaurus from the earliest Jurassic of South Africa & Lesotho , NHM Dino Lab For those of you that like Stegosaur's here is an orange creation. Understand its pretty rare Brazilian researchers have found a nearly complete fossilized skeleton of the Macrocollum itaquii, the oldest long-necked dinosaur in the world, Triassic in age A beautiful specimen of Tianyuraptor housed at the Paleontological Museum of Liaoning, courtesy of Peter Makovicky Michael Ryan posted this maxilla of Daspletosaurus, not sure of locality
  7. Dakotaraptor? Or nanotyrannus?

    This next tooth i just recently purchased was sold to me as a probable dakotaraptor tooth. Its from the hell creek formation in Powder River Co. MT. Its CH is 18 1/2 mm....posterior serrations are 20 per 5 mm. Anterior serrations are 25 per 5 mm. @Troodon , @Andy, @fossilsonwheels
  8. Tyrannosaurus rex or nanotyrannus

    Hey everyone....im gonna start posting everything i have over the next few weeks to get everyones opinions.....if i need to post more info about a specimen just let me know.....first up is a tooth tip i got ...it was labled t- rex or nanotyrannus......from hell creek.
  9. Is nanotyrannus valid?

    Hello everyone, I know this is a big scientific debate and I have researched about it but I haven't come to a conclusion. What do you think? Thank you
  10. T rex or nanotyrannus teeth

    Hello everyone, after having seen many pictures of "nanotyrannus" and t rex teeth i have some questions. The first one being, how can paleontologists distinguish nano teeth from rex teeth and also sell them for a different price when the current theory is that they are the same dinosaur, also in many cases I have seen nano teeth with the same size as t rex teeth differentiated, so if they are the same dinosaur how can this be possible? Thank you for your time.
  11. Hello! Over the weekend I made some new labels for my fossil collection and I was wondering what everyone thought of them. I have QR codes which link to the corresponding "prehistoric-wildlife.com" species page for more info, and I added in some basic I.D. info to the cards to not crowd them. I also attached numbers to the labels and the fossils, so that I don't need to keep the labels directly next to the fossils. Would love to know what you think, and if anyone wants more information/the template I created. Thanks! P.S. Two of my I.D.s I'm still not 100% on (deltadromeus and Pectinodon) and I don't want anyone to assume I've completely I.D.ed them. Thanks!
  12. Help w/ tyrannosaur tooth

    The base is giving me some trouble with this. Wanted to know if I can get some help on ID, rex or nanotyrannus? Lance Creek Formation, Wyoming.
  13. I've just received this weird little tooth from the Hell Creek Formation. It was sold to me as a Dromaeosaur premax tooth but I have my doubts as it's quite robust. That said, the other candidate would be a Tyrannosaur and I've never seen a premax tooth with a twist like this. What's more, the carinae are strange - one has nice crisp serrations (I thought they looked a lot like Tyrannosaur serrations) while the other is smooth (it doesn't look like it ever had any serrations). Anyone have any idea what it might be?
  14. Hey everyone! Today is my birthday and I’m looking to treat myself to a Nanotyrannus lancensis tooth! I’m looking at this one, but these are the only two photos that the seller has listed. It is listed as being 1 1/16 in long and collected from the Hell Creek Formation in Powder River Co., Montana. Do I need to ask for addition photos of the base and tip, or is this enough to satisfy? Thanks in advance!
  15. What do you guys think about nanotyrannus? I thought it is a juvie tyrannosaurus but it's hands were bigger
  16. Dakotaraptor tooth?

    I just saw this tooth listed as Dakotaraptor. It's 3/4" long. Most of these "Dakotaraptor" teeth I see just scream Nanotyrannus, but I'm not so sure on this one. I looked at my Acheroraptor and Nanotyrannus teeth and the distal serrations look a bit more like those of Acheroraptor - especially those near the base. Unfortunately, the mesial serrations are all worn off. What do you guys think?
  17. Fun with 3D Printing Fossils

    So recently my father bought a 3D printer and we've been experimenting printing some cool fossils for a while now. It's a really cool technology. Though it can take a while to print a piece the results are really quite cool. A life size Archaeopteryx can take a few days to print if you don't keep printing during the night. Finishing up the prints afterwards can also take a bit of time. Cleaning off all the supports and sanding down rough surfaces can be quite the process. Then there's painting depending on the desired result of course. There are actually a lot of nice things that can be found for download on the internet. Though many of these models still require a bit of digital cleanup before they could be printed. So here are a number of the painted, unpainted and half painted results. Most of the printed stuff is dinosaur. Photo of the 3D printer and the just finished print of a juvenile Edmontosaurus lower jaw. And here's the same Edmontosaurus jaw print half painted again with the real fossil in mirror image next to it. I scanned the original bone that I then mirrored digitaly so that I could print out the other side of the jaw. Allosaurus hand claw. Clidastes Mosasaur quadrate bone. Skull of the "Prosauropod" Massospondylus. Holotype right lower jaw of Owenodon hoggi, an Iguanodontid. Download link: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/iguanodon-jawbone-f016ad38ebb647988dafd6bbdc1510d0 1/5th scale Nanotyrannus lancensis skull. The Cleveland specimen. Download link for original file: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/nanotyrannus-lancensis-young-t-rex-7b0967fa27674d959647868686b6717b One of my favourites. The Eichstatt Archaeopteryx specimen. Download link for original file: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/eichstatt-archaeopteryx-b71872ad42794ef7883021f2fa9a8079 The right side skeleton of the baby Parasaurolophus "Joe". Printed at 1/5th scale. Right humerus and pedal phalanges printed at life size. Most of the fossil prints are for my collection. But my dad also wanted a few cool things which I painted for him. Skulls of Dodo and Australopithecus Taung Child. Download link for Dodo original file: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/dodo-264b7746a42b41b2845a499de16f8538 Most are painted roughly to look like their real counter parts.
  18. T-rex Teeth Verification

    For context, I have received these photos from the shop that I have done business with previously. I want to ensure that these are rex teeth and not another genus. I acknowledge that these pictures do not show the base of the teeth which seems to be the tell tale differentiation, in addition to measurements of scale and so on. Therefore, I just would like to see the opinions of those on the forum with the pictures provided, I wish I was able to take more appropriate photos of the specimens. Tooth #1 strikes me as a likely rex candidate simply because of the robustness, #2 I'm not so sure. Not an expert on theropod teeth by any means. Thank you all! (The 98 million year old age is a typo, they have a more expensive tooth with the appropriate age of 68 million years)
  19. Nanotyrannus or T-Rex?

    I got this tooth a while ago, and It was sold to me as T-Rex. I’m not really sure if it is indeed from one, or a Nanotyrannus. It’s a small tooth, found in the Hell Creek formation. Either way it’ll still be one of my favorite teeth. I’ll post some pictures.
  20. Worn Nano tooth?

    I got this worn theropod tooth a little while ago. It's labeled as Nanotyrannus from the Lance Formation, Weston County, Wyoming. However, it looks a bit odd compared to other Nano teeth I've seen. Is it a tip from a larger tooth? Can it even be identified when this worn? Have at it Scale is in centimeters
  21. Nanotyrannus?

    I've been looking at this tooth labeled Nanotyrannus from the Lance Formation in Wyoming (scale is in cm) . Now, the photos aren't great but I'm sort of wondering if it really is Nanotyrannus. It isn't quite as rectangular as other nano teeth I've seen (though I'll readily admit that I haven't seen a lot) and seems less curved. Any thoughts?
  22. Theropod Claw Confirmation

    And now my last fossil for the night, one of my favorite fossils in my collection ever is the theropod claw my dad found (I always give credit when he's the discoverer) in the Lance fm. of Wyoming the summer before last. It was identified by the guide as potentially being a Nanotyrannus hand claw but I wanted to confirm that with other members on TFF. It's about 2.5 cm in length.
  23. Hello Fossil Forum, on the German version of our favorite auction site I found something strange. It’s a theropod tooth which looks to me like a tyrannosaurid tooth from Hell Creek formation. Nothing special so far but that the seller claims it’s an exceptionally well made replica! Is that possible?! If so, I feel no longer able to tell a real from a fake tooth. It would be the best tooth replica I’ve ever seen. How could the serration and enamel be faked so well? But if it’s real, why would the seller claim it’s not? Any opinions? I’m not planning to buy it, just curious... Regards, Vertebrate
  24. Hello all. Seller has this labeled as a dakotaraptor tooth. After hours of my own research and still being unable to come to a clear conclusion I decided to post here for help. Troodons guide helped a great deal but I still couldn't be positive. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  25. I'm still on the fence about if Nanotyannus l. is a valid genus or not. I used to be firmly on the "Juvenile T.rex" side with Carr but some arguments such as the odd limb proportions on "Bloody Mary", tooth counts in actual juvenile Tyrannosaurus like "Baby Bob", and there being two "types" of Tyrannosaurid teeth in Hell Creek with overlapping sizes but very different shapes which don't all seem to be cases of it being teeth from different parts of the mouth, have shifted me to being open to both sides. I suppose it does make ecological sense for there to be a medium-size carnivore in the same region as a very large predator as the prey taken would likely differ drastically. So while I'm undecided, I can certainly see either argument being true. But hypothetically speaking, if Nanotyrannus turns out to be a valid genus, what branch of the family tree exactly would it come from? Based off time and location I'd be tempted to say it's a Tyrannosaurinae like Tarbosaurus or Tyrannosaurus, but last I checked most definite members of that group tended to be a lot more robust. I also recall when it was first described, Gilmore called it a species of Gorgosaurus. The lean build and thinner teeth do align with Albertosaurinae, but they could be convergently evolved I suppose.
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