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Found 11 results

  1. Sir Charles Lyell's historical fossils (London's Natural History Museum) accessible online, February 21, 2019, Pensoft Publishers https://phys.org/news/2019-02-sir-charles-lyell-historical-fossils.html Consuelo Sendino, The Lyell Collection at the Earth Sciences Department, Natural History Museum, London (UK), Biodiversity Data Journal (2019). DOI: 10.3897/BDJ.7.e33504 https://bdj.pensoft.net/article/33504/ Although completely unrelated, the below article is quite interesting. Why Do Zebras Have Stripes? By JoAnna Klein, New York times, Feb. 20, 2019 https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/20/science/zebra-stripes-flies.html Tim Caro, Yvette Argueta, Emmanuelle Sophie Briolat, Joren Bruggink, Maurice Kasprowsky, Jai Lake, Matthew J. Mitchell, Sarah Richardson, and Martin How. 2019, Benefits of zebra stripes: Behaviour of tabanid flies around zebras and horses. PLOS ONE. Published: February 20, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0210831 Yours, Paul H.
  2. I attended DinoFest at the Natural History Museum of Utah this year. Once a year they open up the prep lab and their storage room to the public. While I took more photos then I could ever post, here are the highlights.
  3. Yesterday I made a visit to the Natural History Museum of Maastricht (The Netherlands) for my Birthday The museum is only a 40 minute drive from where I live and it showcases the entire natural history of the region, the cool thing about this museum is that the fossils which are showcased here are all regional fossils from The Netherlands, Germany & Belgium. I am starting the topic off with 2 pictures of the special exhibit called Microsculptures, which shows giant detailed photographs of insects to show how magnifecent they are. Then I went on to the "Mosaleum" which holds "BĂ©r" the holotype specimen of Prognathodon saturator
  4. Hi everyone, A couple days ago, during my stay in Berlin, I got to visit a very famous museum. The Natural History Museum of Berlin, of course! The expo's are amazing. I took so many pictures of everything! I'll only show a handful though, because I don't want to spoil the whole thing in case one of you has the opportunity to visit it. These are just some tasters to make you want to go there! Enjoy the quick virtual tour! Max
  5. Digital Fossil Museum

    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46497406
  6. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  7. Hi everyone, I was just scrolling facebook a few moments ago and came across a few posts by the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences and saw that there is a new documentary series about the museum itself on Canvas, the series is called "Er was eens" and the first episode that will air today at 19u will be all about the fossil collection including the Iguanodons of Bernissart & Plateosaurus Ben. So maybe a tip for everyone that has the network "Canvas" in Belgium & the Netherlands. https://vimeo.com/297901181?fbclid=IwAR2F5eIbYwzRKCAtfwcYIG8EZsXwZZF2nUhtUPw3dIYAQem_YrSLLP-t3TQ And the museum also posted that the science magazine EOS will do a 82 pages big special on the iguanodons of Bernissart, maybe another tip for all the belgian & dutch member, I'll definiatly get myself a copy!
  8. As some might have read in a previous topic, I went to visit my girlfriend in Finland. Unfortunatly Finland must be one of the worst places to find fossils in the world, I did manage to find some quartz vains and a few pieces that may or may not be amber (have to do the hot needle test on them first) Even urban fossil hunting is near impossible as pretty much all buildings are made from the fossil-lacking stones that can be found in Finland. The only urban fossils I found was in the Burger King in the Helsinki Central Station, the floor was littered with orthocones there. But Finland really isn't a good place to hunt fossils. But one thing that definitly is a worth a visit is the Finnish Museum of Natural History! It isn't a really big museum, the collection isn't that big, but the way it is presented is very awesome! One of the few musea that nails being modern and educative at the same time without overdoing it. Especially the Taxidermy diorama's were done amazingly. But I will ofcourse start this topic with what I think will interest you guys the most, the Paleontology part of the museum. A mural with Pikaia, Opabinia & Hallucigenia models Trilobites, most of which were found in Aland (Finland), Gotland (Sweden) and other neighboring countries of Finland Trilobites, most of which were found in Aland (Finland), Gotland (Sweden) and other neighboring countries of Finland Orthocone models Graptolites Eurypterid found in Saarermaa in Estonia (Silurian age) Eurypterid model Giant orthocone model
  9. My first post here. A chance to visit the Kitakyushu Museum of Natural History in Japan. Stunning fossil display and great signage design. Please see the photos. Also, I'm now studying the visitor experience development in natural history museums. Can anyone spare 3 mins to do an online survey? It's all about natural history museums. https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BLKHYCW
  10. Natural History Museum of Milan

    In June 2016, during a trip to Italy, I went for a morning to the Natural History Museum of Milan to check out the fossils they had. I was slightly disappointed when I learned that the Scipionyx samniticus holotype specimen was no longer housed over there, but the museum did on the other hand have some rather neat fossils. Here they are 2 labyrinthodont skulls from the Permian of Madagascar (Sakamena Formation?), preserved as part and counterpart: 1) Parotosuchus madagascariensis 2) Indeterminate capitosaurid 3) Resin casts of the skulls Pterosaur phalange from the Triassic of Italy Dermal "armour" of a Bothriolepis canadensis from the Upper Devonian of Canada Edestus heinrichi (eugeneodontid chondrichthyan similar to Helicoprion) tooth from the Carboniferous of the USA (they didn't give more specific location details) Astreptoscolex anasillosus (polychaete worm) from the Carboniferous of Mazon Creek, USA Well preserved skull of Askeptosaurus italicus from the Triassic Besano Formation (Besano, Italy) Hope you liked it! Don't worry guys, I'll post more from this museum in the next few days.
  11. I'm sure several of the TFF members have kids also fascinated with fossils or dinosaurs (like a famous T-rex painter, the daughter of @Monica) - here is an attraction in London you just cannot miss https://londonist.com/london/family/a-dinosaur-sleepover-at-natural-history-museum
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