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Found 84 results

  1. M&M Ranch in Nebraska

    My younger son Mel just led his first fossil trip of the year on our Oligocene M&M Ranch in Nebraska last week. My sons, Mel and Marco Jr., are starting to get back from their prepper some of the fossils that they found on our ranch in 2018. Not all fossils go to the prepper. Mel preps some of the specimens himself. Below is a picture of the specimens Mel found in 2018 that he will prep. Here are a few pictures of 2018 specimens just back from the prepper. Mel found another saber cat in 2018 that is in prep. Below are a saber cat skull found by Mel and saber cat skeleton found by Marco Jr. (the skeleton was still in prep in this picture and I can't find the finished picture right now) in previous years on the ranch. They have found seven or eight so far on the ranch. I'll probably be going out to the ranch a couple of times this year. However, I spend most of my time at the ranch taking matrix that contains micro squamate, bird, amphibian, and mammal specimens. I'm currently working with seven researchers on this micro material. Marco Sr.
  2. Oreodont in situ - Nebraska Oligocene

  3. On my wife and my epic fossil trip this fall we spent a day in Nebraska in the White River badlands. Found some of the normal stuff...nothing spectacular but neat for us as we had this as a "bucket list" locality. One of our best finds was an oreodont skull. I found the nose at the bottom of a gully, and worked my way up until I found the outline of the broken bone. I dug out a volleyball-size chunk of rock and brought it home. Just finished prepping it out. It needs some reconstruction of areas around the snout that were weathered away, but all in all I am pleased with how it came out. At camp with a little rough prep to see what we had. Top view while at camp. Packed it away at this point. Underside after reattaching the muzzle.
  4. Hello forum preppers....need some advice. I started what I thought would be a very easy prep on a partial turtle I found in Nebraska this past fall. It was in 2 halves about 5 feet apart on a slope. Clean, glue together. Easy peasy. But....when I started cleaning I found that at least part of Mr. Turtle is still at home in the shell. So....I'm trying to figure the best approach. I'm thinking that I may remove the plastron as it is not all there, put it together and use it as a removable "lid" and then prep out the inside of the shell some. Problem with that is that it would lead to displaying the turtle upside down with the best looking part on the bottom. Also, can anyone ID the species at this point? Ideas appreciated!
  5. Nebraska Ground Sloth Claws

    This group of ground sloth claws are all personal river finds from Nebraska.
  6. These toe bones were found in association with a ton of fragments. Quite a puzzle! Any idea from these tiny hooves what I might be working on?
  7. My wife and I found these small jaw fragments in W. Nebraska earlier this month. Not sure of the ID's. Each is about 3 cm long. Help is appreciated! Jaw 1 Jaw 2 Jaw 3 Jaw 4 Jaw 5
  8. Ashfall fossil beds

    Visit to Ashfall fossil beds in North East Nebraska recently. It's out of the way for about anyone, but worth a visit. I didn't get too many photos, but here are a few. The statues show the "rhino barn" in the background. A few shots inside, and the "first building" has some very cool stuff removed from the pit, and a nice section of a plesiosaur from a niobrara deposit nearby.
  9. Soon I will be taking the family on our annual vacation. We plan on leaving central ks, and going almost straight north to the Ashfall fossil beds in Nebraska. We will then head up to Big Sandy lake in Minnesota for a week of relaxation and fishing. I'm looking for any suggestions on rock/ fossil related things anybody here might suggest. Thanks in advance!
  10. Unidentified tibia from an old collection

    In an old collection I found this small tibia. It is missing the proximal end. I believe this fossil came from Lower Snake Creek making it Miocene. I have no idea what this would have been from. Ruler in pictures is in inches.
  11. Teeth from an old collection.

    This is my first endeavor into fossil identification and I find it fascinating! I am going through an old collection here at the nature center in Marshall County, Iowa. The collection all seems to have come from Lower Snake Creek in western Nebraska. Most of the fossils in the collection are various horse teeth but these three are different and I need some help figuring out what they are. #1 Length: 43mm Width: 23mm Height: 27mm #2 Length: 35mm Width: 20mm Height: 26mm #3 Length: 23mm Width: 13mm Height: 16mm
  12. Fossil Hunting in Nebraska

    Hi everyone, My father and I are going to be in the Crawford area at the end of May. We are already planning to visit the Norman Ranch and High Plains Homestead (the Semroska's Ranch?) but we could only get a few days at each due to them being booked otherwise. We would like to visit another ranch on the few days we couldn't schedule. Does anyone know another ranch that allows fossil hunting? We are just looking to go for 2-3 days. Thanks!
  13. Eumys (Myomorpha, Oligocene)

    Looking for second opinions, confirmation, or correction on this jaw from the White River Group, Oligocene, Nebraska. These last few posts represent my first "go around" with rodent teeth. I have this one as Myomorpha cf. Eumys elegans. Of the teeth listed in "The Mammalian Fauna of the White River Oligocene: Part II. Rodentia" by Scott et al. 1937, this seemed like the best match. An old publication, but I see that this taxon is still valid. I'm sure new species have been discovered. Here is the jaw. Scale in mm. Close up of occlusal surface not to scale.
  14. Palaeolagus? (Oligocene: Lagomorpha)

    Looking for confirmation or correction on this jaw fragment from the White River Group (Oligocene) of Nebraska. I have it as a Lagomorph cf. Palaeolagus. Scale is in mm. (Occlusal view on lower right is enlarged and not to scale).
  15. Ischyromys? (rodentia)

    I am looking for confirmation of the identity of this rodent jaw from the White River Group of NW Nebraska. I am thinking Ischyromys. Thoughts? Scale is mm. Occlusal view enlarged and not to scale. @jpc, @Fruitbat, @Nimravis
  16. Leptomeryx (Oligocene Mammalia)

    I'm looking for confirmation on this. I think it is Leptomeryx. The two occlusal views are the same but with different lighting. The other photos are labial and lingual views of the jaw. White River Group. Oligocene. Nebraska. Scale in cm/mm. Occlusal view not to scale. @Harry Pristis, @jpc, @Nimravis
  17. Pierre Shale Coprolite

    Here is another coprolite. Wondering if the class of organism that defecated it can be determined. I found it in a particularly desolate (in terms of fossils) exposure of Pierre Shale (late cretaceous) in NW Nebraska. It was the only fossil I found in 2 hours of hunting. Pic to left shows close-up with fish bone inclusions. @GeschWhat
  18. Niobrara Coprolite

    I am wondering if any more information can be gleaned from this specimen beyond "coprolite". Bony fish? Shark? Mosasaur? Niobrara fm., Cretaceous. NW Nebraska. @GeschWhat
  19. Turtle Caudal Vertebrae?

    Dear TFF members, I am seeking confirmation of the class and order of vertebrate to which these vertebrae belong. This is a ventral view. I am thinking turtle caudal vertebrae. White River Group. Nebraska. Oligocene. Scale in cm/mm
  20. Tortoise Display Stand

    After prepping the big Stylemys that I recovered in Nebraska this summer, it seemed a shame to have spent all that time on the plastron only to have it sitting on a shelf out of view. So today I welded together a stand for it. I wanted the part upon which the tortoise rests to have as small a footprint as possible, because my idea was to use a mirror or mirrors to make the plastron visible to observers. Of course the angle of the mirror will depend on the height of the shelf where the tortoise is displayed. At just below eye level, this set up works reasonably well. If positioned below eye-level, this set-up works well (showing even more of the plastron).
  21. "Bingo", Oreodont!

    I took a trip to Nebraska to collect the White River Formations for the very first time this past summer. I had two goals: recover a Stylemys and an Oreodont skull. I found both! I reported on the prep of the Stylemys in an earlier post on the prep sub-forum. When I saw the Oreodont, I yelled "Bingo, Oreodont!". So that's the name I gave the animal. This post will summarize the discovery, preparation, and reconstruction of the specimen. The skull was not complete, and only about 25-30% of the animal was present, so with apologies to the "Palaeo Police" , I decided that this specimen would have a greater contribution as a display piece than sitting in a drawer with other oreodont remains (which are common and numerous). Also, if any of these bones were later found to be of scientific importance, the procedures used in this reconstruction are reversible THE DISCOVERY Bingo was spotted on the side of a relatively steep butte. The first thing I saw was the partial skull. Here it is: After exclaiming (proclaiming) "Bingo!", I left the skull and immediately went to the base of the butte and started probing and digging in the two washouts that originated in the vicinity of the skull. These re-worked deposits were yielding lots of bone elements from the posterior to the anterior of the skeleton. I even managed to recover the brain cast and pieces of the skull that had washed down. Once the re-worked deposits had been thoroughly searched, I climbed up to the skull and began excavating. The top of the snout was crushed (predation?). The brain case area was also fragmented as well as the rear of the jaw. Some of this was pieced together later from elements found in the spoil at the base of the butte. I removed the skull via a "soft jacket". Here is what was recovered:
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