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Found 6 results

  1. Looking for species ID on this Neithea bivalve. Found this in Travis County in Williamson Creek gravel bed (Qt).
  2. Neithea coquandi (Peron 1877)

    Shell preservation.
  3. Neithea or Pecten Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Neithea (Pecten) Fossil SITE LOCATION: Coryell County, Texas TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretacious (100-145 million years ago) Data: Neithea is an extinct genus of bivalve mollusks that lived from the Early Jurassic to the early Paleocene, with a worldwide distribution. Neithia sp. are inequivalve. That means that the two valves are not the same shape, the right valve being strongly concave and the left valve being flattened or concave. Sculpture consist of alternating strong and weaker radiating ribs. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Pectinoida Family: Oxytomidae Genus: Neithea
  4. Neithea or Pecten Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Neithea (Pecten) Fossil SITE LOCATION: Coryell County, Texas TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretacious (100-145 million years ago) Data: Neithea is an extinct genus of bivalve mollusks that lived from the Early Jurassic to the early Paleocene, with a worldwide distribution. Neithia sp. are inequivalve. That means that the two valves are not the same shape, the right valve being strongly concave and the left valve being flattened or concave. Sculpture consist of alternating strong and weaker radiating ribs. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Pectinoida Family: Oxytomidae Genus: Neithea
  5. Please help me with the below.. I found this pectenoid fossil and many more in the rumbles of an old mine in Attika area af Greece. Usually the terestrial fossils near the beach are of Pliocene or Pleistocene age. But this fossil comes from the digged earth of a mine and looks totally different than the Pliocene shells. It has Black color and the shape is also different.. It reminds me of Neithea species?? But Neithea were Jurassic era fossils... Could it be??? Size 3cm X 3cm.. Thank you very much in advance...!
  6. John and I headed out for a couple hours to our Washita Group site this afternoon. The water was still deep in some spots, but we were able to get around to a few new locations. We found three or four of the expected ammonites (Oxytropidoceras acutocarinatum), plus a couple things I have yet to id. By far MY find of the day was an echinoid spine that I spied (even though it was partially covered by leaves) in a Denton Clay exposure. This exposure also gave us a few irregular echinoids, and several Neithea sp., including the one shown below, which has exceptional preservation. I do have to say this, however, my favorite part of the day was later this evening at my daughter's high school parent/teacher conference while talking with her Biology II instructor. John was with us, and I mentioned we'd been out fossil hunting this afternoon. That started a little conversation between the teacher and John. John told him "You know, understanding geology is really important when you're looking for fossils. You have to understand the different layers of rock to know where to look for fossils, and the ages they represent to identify them properly." The instructor looked at him, shook his head and said, "You know, I don't think there's anyone in my classes, other than your sister, that would have any idea what you just said--and how true it is." It made me proud that he's soaking up important stuff while having a good time.
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