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Found 28 results

  1. Found these imprints in the island of Rhodes (Greece). The age of the cediment according to geological maps of the area is upper Pliocene to lower Pleistocene. The units on the scale are cm. I wonder if my assumptions about pine cones are correct (even considered cycad cones) having read about pine cone specimens being found on the island. Would be really happy if someone could pinpoint the species from the shape of indentations - in the first image which is the most detailed there appears to be a small hole in the center of what I suppose are the cone scales. This can also be seen in the second image, though the structure is in worse shape probably due to being exposed for a long time.
  2. Bivalves from Madagascar

    Hi everyone, I went to a small rock shop some time ago and bought these three fossil bivalves. Unfortunately, the only information they had on them was that they were from Madagascar. More importantly than the species, I'd really like to find out a more precise location and age (including formation) for them. There were 6 shells available in the shop (all clearly from the same location). 4 of them were #1, then #2 and #3 were unique. #1: I think it's something from the Mactridae family.
  3. Fish teeth? Any ideas?

    We have found these on the same samples where we found some shark and ray teeth... it looks like teleost teeth?! Grid scale (5 mm) Any ideas?
  4. Ray teeth? Pt2

    I need help identifying this piece of dental plaque from a ray. Any ideas?
  5. Great talk about the vertebrate paleontology of Kyrgyzstan. Changing Landscapes in the Tien Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Dr. Win McLaughlin (Oberlin College) Published on Mar 11, 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuoJi8rpPxA Yours, Paul H.
  6. 'survival of the laziest'

    New research suggests evolution might favor 'survival of the laziest' August 21, 2018, University of Kansas http://news.ku.edu/2018/08/15/new-research-suggests-evolution-might-favor-‘survival-laziest’ https://phys.org/news/2018-08-evolution-favor-survival-laziest.html Luke C. Strotz, Erin E. Saupe, Julien Kimmig, and Bruce S. Lieberman, 2018, Metabolic rates, climate and macroevolution: a case study using Neogene molluscs. Proceedings of the Royal Academy B Published 22 August 2018.DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2018.1292 http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/285/1885/20181292 Yours, Paul H.
  7. I am planning to head over to Green Mill Run in North Carolina this coming weekend (6/16/18) to do some hunting. I have done a little research but haven't come across too much. I know there are lots of shark teeth, as well cretaceous, paleogene, and neogene fossils. I was curious if anyone has been, and if so what some of the hot spots might be. Not sure if I should head closer to the main river, or stay within the smaller channels to search. Will probably do some visual hunting as well as sifting. Any information would be greatly appreciated!
  8. Dear TFF members, Any of those ones for small European Neogene Bivalvia or Gastropoda. Kind regards, Ricardo Pentacrinus penichensis LORIOL, 1891, Cabo Carvoeiro Formation, Cabo Carvoeiro 5 Member, Upper Toarcian. 8-10 mm. ps. type location specimens. Pentacrinus basaltiformis MILLER, 1821, Água de Madeiros Formation, Upper Sinemurian, Portugal. 2- 20 mm. RESERVED Thanks. Pentacrinus sp., Cabo Carvoeiro Formation, Cabo Carvoeiro 5 Member, Upper Toarcian, Portugal. 8-15 mm.
  9. Dear The Fossil Forum members, I have those Cnidaria (and a few other unidentified Cnidaria genera) from Camadas de Alcobaça Formation, Kimmeridgian, Portugal. I would be interested in Neogene Bivalvia or Gastropoda. If interested drop me a line please. Kind regards, Ricardo
  10. NALMA, SALMA, GABI

    FLYKOwswish this article has some bearing on the following issues: Mammal biochronology,the precise timing and/or speed of the G(reat)A(merican)B(iotic)I(nterchange),it contains some remarks on mammal taxa(however brief), magnetostratigraphic resolution from the Miocene to the Pleistocene, the closing of the Panama isthmus, and the possible diachroneity of mammal taxon appearances. There are NO taxa illustrated,and the authors' (infrequent)use of "heterochroneity " is unfortunate . If you have Woodburne(2012): this might be up your alley I liked it,but I'm weird that way
  11. I have a coprolite that has me somewhat puzzled. It was found in a river in South Carolina and dates Miocene-Pliocene. I picked it up at the Tucson Gem Show because I thought it resembled some east coast coprolites with longitudinal striations/furrows/grooves that @MarcoSr posted a while back. Now that I've looked at it for a while and done a little prep work, I'm not so sure the grooves are sphincter related. There are intestinal muscle marks visible on one side, but they don't seem to match up with the grooves. The grooves were filled with sandstone/limestone. I left matrix in the deeper portions to preserve the integrity of the specimen. Across from the grooves are what look like puncture marks. My first thought was that they were clam borings. However, they do line up with the grooves in question. Now I'm wondering if these could be tooth marks as well. Under magnification, I noticed smaller tooth marks and an impression that I can't figure out. My imagination is now getting the best of me, and I'm seeing food chain activity. I'm seeing a big fish nabbing a small fish that was nabbing an invertebrate that was feasting on feces. Do you think the larger grooves and holes could be tooth marks? Does anyone have any idea what could have left the impression? The only thing I could think of is some sort of mollusk. Love your thoughts on this. @Carl
  12. Hi, For people interested in plant fossils, there is an open access 2017 eBook about the paleobotany of Australia online. It is; History of the Australian Vegetation: Cretaceous to Recent Edited by Robert S. Hill, 2017, University of Adelaide Press http://www.oapen.org/search?identifier=628112 http://www.oapen.org/search?keyword=History+of+the+Australian+Vegetation http://www.oapen.org/home Yours, Paul H.
  13. I thought I would bring in the forum on a difference of opinion among a few collectors. Attached are views of a specimen identified as a Metaxytherium tusk (late Miocene, Bone Valley Formation, unnamed phosphate mine, Polk County, Florida) by one experienced Florida collector and another collector familiar with a range of marine mammal fossils. Two other experienced Florida collectors leaned toward an ID of whale tooth. The specimen resembles one in Domning (1988: p. 409, fig. 7) which was identified as a Metaxytherium tusk. The specimen in question is straight like a tusk with an enamel-coated crown with a constriction toward the tip as in the figure. I've looked for a similar specimen labelled as a whale tooth in various publications (Richard Hulbert's "Fossil Vertebrates of Florida; the Lee Creek volume that covers mammals, etc.) but couldn't find one. Metaxytherium was a "sea cow" or dugong relative that lived during the Miocene - a time when sea cows were more diverse and widespread than they are today. The Florida collector who thought it was a Metaxytherium tusk pointed out the enamel texture and its laterally-compressed overall form was the same as a tusk. The other Florida collectors didn't point out any particular feature to count it out as a Metaxytherium tusk - just didn't look right to them. I can understand having difficulty articulating an overall impression. Those two guys know Florida fossils so I respect their opinions. I'm interested in reading what other collectors think - especially all the Florida/Bone Valley collectors out there. I'll try to get a scan of the figure in the Domning article and attach it - couldn't find a pdf in a quick search. Thanks, Jess Domning, D. P. 1988. Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. I. Metaxytherium floridanum Hay, 1922. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 8:395–426.
  14. Hi all, I have been having trouble finding a good guide to use in order to ID fossil seashells (mainly gastropods and bivalves) of the Neogene-Quaternary of Western Europe (mainly Belgium/Netherlands). So, I'm turning to you guys: does anyone of you have a nice up-to-date website/online paper that I could use in order to help me ID all of my different seashells? Preferable with clear photos/drawings of the different species. Thanks in advance! Max
  15. Possible skull material, Capitola

    Hey everybody! It’s been a handful of years since I posted on here, but I was in Capitola recently and I picked up this fossil. The low tide wasn’t very low that day, (3.7 I think?) so...not the best day for collecting, but I drove in from AZ so I went anyway. On my way back to the car (giant toddler in one arm, heavy bag of fossils/shells/rocks in the other, I tripped over this guy. I didn’t get a chance to really look at it but It looked like it might have had bone in it so I threw it in the bag thinking maybe it was a partial vert or something. But now that I’m home and unpacked and have had a chance to actually look at it, it seems like it might be some part of a skull? Does that seem right? (Can you tell I mostly stick to invertebrates? Ha!) Also, sorry if this picture ends up being huge this is my first time posting from my phone and I can’t figure out how to change the size. It will only let me attach one photo, so I’m assuming the size is the issue. thanks in advance for your help! Edited to add Capitola makes this Purisima Formation, Neogene Period so Miocene/Pliocene. Marine fossils. (Forgot all the important information!)
  16. Flourescent Fossil Gastropod

    From the album Fossil Flourescence

    A gastropod shell of the family Olividae viewed under natural light at left and under short-wave ultraviolet light at right.

    © c. 2017 Heather J M Siple

  17. Here are a great white (Carcharodon carcharias) and an Aetobatus tooth from a site other than the main one(s) around Sacaco from which we have seen teeth (or perhaps an example of what was found on the surface). This Aetobatus tooth might be the coolest-looking one I have - rather large with deep color and some apparent microfossils embedded within the patch of attached matrix. I am starting this thread because there was a question in another thread about the range of preservation seen in fossils from the Pisco Formation, Sacaco area, Peru. We tend to see mostly lighter-colored (blue or pink or blue and pink), well-preserved great white teeth with great serrations but there were also some teeth on the market that were more worn and duller in color yet shiny from that wear. They appear to be more mineralized too. If you have similar Peruvian shark teeth, feel free to post your photos. You can't get them anymore but we can look at some of what was allowed to go before the export ban. I tried to pick up the widest variety of fossils while available. Jess
  18. Hey all - our collections manager and I busted our tails off yesterday trying to get everything ready for the Aurora Fossil Festival on Saturday in Aurora, NC. We're going to have a table for the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History (CCNHM), our museum at College of Charleston. We've got some neat casts on display as well as a couple of cases - one is a case chock full of fossils from Folly Beach, SC, and the other is a case full of Miocene and Pliocene odontocete ear bones from the Lee Creek Mine. If you're attending, be sure to bring marine mammal fossils with you for identification - or just to show off and make us jealous! We'll be in the community center sandwiched between tables for the Smithsonian and the North Carolina Fossil Club. We're looking forward to seeing you there! Lastly, we're also looking for marine mammal fossils from Belgrade Quarry to add to our collections as part of ongoing study of Oligocene marine mammals from the southeastern USA. Teeth, earbones, and skull fragments are not common at Belgrade but several critical specimens have already been donated. With a few more specimens, I will be able to put together a paper on the marine mammal fauna of the Belgrade Formation. Hope to see you there!
  19. George Houston Dukes Jr, 1961, Some Tertiary Fossil Woods of Louisiana and Mississippi. unpublished PhD dissertation. Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College http://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_disstheses/668/ http://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1667&context=gradschool_disstheses http://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_disstheses/ Yours, Paul H.
  20. This tooth was collected in the Sharktooth Hill Bonebed by Bob Ernst back around 1994-1995. At the time he and I thought it was a weird Parotodus because it appears to have a bourlette. The form wasn't really a good match otherwise. It's just over 1 7/8 inches along the slant and about 3/8 inches in labiolingual thickness. The cutting edges are underrated with no hint of lateral cusplets The tip is chipped but it doesn't appear to have been damaged when it was collected. Now, I think it's the giant thresher, Alopias grandis, but seems irregular for that as it basal outline of the root isn't a broader U-shape - maybe a jaw position variation or a regional variation. The apparent bourlette could be just the way some of the enameloid wore off. I don't think I've seen another tooth like this one from the STH Bonebed - thought the forum might want to see something oddball. I was inspired by that weird spiny thing that Marco posted a photo of. Jess
  21. I've been away on business in Florida and had a chance on Sunday to visit the Florida Museum of Natural History. Actually, I had only enough time to visit the gift shop and check to see if they were selling those mammoth Christmas cards (mammoth skeleton on the front - the cards themselves are not gigantic) they have sold in the past. They had them and I was just going to buy a bunch of those but I looked around the shop for extra Christmas presents when I spotted a new publication for sale: Boyd, B. M. 2016 Fossil sharks and rays of Gainesville creeks Alachua County, Florida: Hawthorn Group (middle Miocene to lower Pliocene.Florida Paleontological Society Special Papers (February 2016). 40p. The price is $10 and you can order it through the society's website: floridapaleosociety.com I haven't had time to read it but it has some nice color photos of teeth and other shark/ray fossils. I looks like something to pick up because the tooth descriptions are detailed including those for some Carcharhinus species - always interesting to shark tooth collectors. The museum is great, so if you can, check it out. Admission is free except for the permanent Butterfly Rainforest exhibit and whatever traveling exhibit being hosted ("Wicked Plants" for about another month). Dump some change in the donation box and buy something in the gift shop.
  22. Farlow, J. O., Steinmetz, J. C., and DeChurch, D. A., 2010, Geology of the Late Neogene Pipe Creek Sinkhole (Grant County, Indiana): Indiana Geological Survey Special Report 69, 93 p. http://www.kgs.ku.edu/General/Personnel/klm/GAL/Farlow_etal_2010_PCS_monograph.pdf https://igs.indiana.edu/bookstore/details.cfm?ItemID=2102&Pub_Num=SR69#gsc.tab=0 Czaplewski, N. J., Farlow, J. O., and Argast, A., 2012, A Fossil Shrew (Mammalia, Soricidae) from the Pipe Creek Sinkhole (Late Neogene: Hemphillian), Indiana. Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science. vol. 121, npo. 11, pp. 79-86. https://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/ias/article/view/21038 Yours, Paul H.
  23. Chesepectin middlesexensis

    From the album Neogene fossils

    Chesepectin middlesexensis, Pliocene, Yorktown formation, Yorktown, Virginia, USA. Covered with barnacles.
  24. Chesepectin middlesexensis

    From the album Neogene fossils

    Chesepectin middlesexensis, Pliocene, Yorktown formation, Yorktown, Virginia, USA. Interior of shell
  25. a book review of: "The Monkey's Bridge: Mysteries of Evolution in Central America" by David Rains Wallace. Trinity University Press trade paperback edition (originally published by Sierra Club Books, 1997). 277 pages. Suggested Retail: $18.95 USD. The formation of the Isthmus of Panama, the land bridge connecting the Americas, was the most recent, significant tectonic event of the Cenozoic Era. It occurred just over three million years ago and carried with it not only local but also global consequences. The land connection allowed terrestrial plants and animals to invade new territories north and south as it also cut off a seaway between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. It would later pose a confounding and deadly obstacle course to Old World explorers and fortune-hunters - a land untamed even into the 20th century. "The Monkey's Bridge" tells three stories: how the Isthmus of Panama evolved in geologic time; how Europeans discovered Central America across the past five hundred years and how the author arrived at his understanding of it across his adult life. David Rains Wallace is an award-winning natural history writer. He has also collaborated with the National Park Service publishing handbooks about Yellowstone and Mammoth Cave. His research leading to the "The Monkey's Bridge" involved extensive travel through the Americas which also produced his earlier book about Costa Rica's national parks (Wallace, 1992). Following a 10-page prologue, the book is composed of two parts: Exploration and Evolution. Part 1 introduces the European explorers and naturalists who encountered the landforms, organisms, and native peoples of Central America. Part 2 focuses on the landforms, organisms, and peoples themselves. While the first part could be said to be the history section with the second, the prehistory section, the paleontology of the region is also discussed in the first and historic figures reappear in the second. Across both parts Wallace recalls his own trips taken from 1971 to 1994, traveling by hitchhiking, by bus, and often on foot. Wallace writes in a very literate but also readable style different from the comparatively flat descriptions of people, places, and things in the average paleo-related story. It's the difference between a professional travel writer and a scientist who is also a writer. He looks for more connections between history, art, and science while a scientist writing the same book might translate the technical into the popular without unpacking as many adjectives. While this book is clearly well-researched as Wallace cites several publications and quotes numerous people, the reader might sense that he is not a scientist from a few minor fumbles. He refers to the Florida Museum of Natural History twice as the Florida State Museum (p. 70, 71). He thinks that extinct horses did not have toes - just hooves (which he calls "hoofs"). In reality they did have hooves on their toes. Related to that, he notes that "three-toed horses were replaced by larger two-toed horses." Actually, three-toed horses had one-toed descendants without a two-toed transition. Wallace does reveal a good knowledge of today's plants and animals of the Americas. He recognizes species he didn't expect to see in Central America - forms seemingly more at home in parts of the United States. They add more diversity to the picture of the intercontinental exchange of organisms after the formation of the isthmus. Other than a map at the beginning of each of the two parts of the text, there are no illustrations. The writing will hold the attention of the average natural history fan and perhaps even interest the more casual reader used to more visual support. However, I think when dealing with extinct organisms and colorful living ones, an author should include some photos and figures to break up the text. Wallace did not feature much illustration in his "Beasts of Eden" (2004) a book about two museum murals, but he did in his "Neptune's Ark (2007), which discusses several extinct animals of the west coast of North America. Even with so little illustration I highly recommend "The Monkey's Bridge" to anyone interested in natural history. It is very informative with an excellent mainstream explanation of the geologic processes that created the Isthmus of Panama. Throughout the book, the reader travels along and experiences the author's first-timer surprise in different areas of the land bridge: the limited stretches of jungle, the sudden expanses of near-desert, and the abrupt changes in elevation. Wallace meets interesting people, visits remote museums, and seems to find himself on the edge of a bad situation more than a few times so it is an adventure well worth reading. Jess
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