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Found 49 results

  1. Fossillarry's Mammals

    As Larry familiarizes himself with how to attach photos to his posts, I will be posting for him. Larry is a humble collector of mammals but he is very experienced. He is one of the rare mammal collectors with knowledge of Eocene-Pleistocene groups. Most collectors specialize in Oligocene or Miocene-Pleistocene of North America but he knows a wide variety of forms specializing in ungulates (hoofed mammals of the Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla. He's hunted from California to Nebraska and South Dakota to Texas. The first specimen he'd like to share with the forum is a 2-tooth maxilla section of Cardiolophus, an early tapiroid from the Early Eocene, Willwood Formation of Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. A tapiroid is a perissodactyl (odd-toed ungulate) that currently appears to be part of the lineage that connects to modern tapirs or is likely related to that lineage. Larry might ask me to clarify that further. One thing to remember about Cardiolophus is that it was part of a great radiation of mammals that appeared at the base of the Eocene. It was the time of the earliest horse, tapir, chalicothere, and titanothere.. These animals were very much alike in form and dentition as they descended from a common ancestor in the Late Paleocene. Also attached is a photo of jaw sections of Cardiolophus. Jess
  2. Planorbis freshwater gastropods?

    Found this mortality plate in the thin compact layer between neogene conglomerates and marl, above the flysch, at Milia beach in Alonissos island, Greece. According to a paper regarding the neogene in Alonissos [ http://sciencepress.mnhn.fr/sites/default/files/articles/pdf/g2019v41a3.pdf ] findings from marl deposits in an abandoned lignite quarry near Votsi village include Planorbis freshwater gastropods. Have I also found planorbis gastropods? Am I looking at Miocene or Pliocene fossils? As always any suggestions are much appreciated!
  3. This summer, I visited the beautiful island of Kythera. Located in South Greece, on the joint of three seas, it is a very calm place that combines wild nature, delicious traditional food and history. The lore says that Zeus castrated his father, Kronos. His testicles fell in the sea at the shores of the island and from there Aphrodite (Venus) was born. Goddess of love and fertility, she is also connected with sea due to the way of her birth. This is the point where mythology, history and lore meet. Since the ancient people discovered pectinidae, they built a temple dedicated to Aphrodite. Although I never found the temple, I located the formation. Situated in the middle of the island, the area of Mitata (Μητάτα) is within a Neogene formation. The easiest place to observe the formation is at 36.2508099, 23.0003155 I found many pectinidae and an echinoid, about 15cm diameter. The last one was not fully retrieved. I underestimated its hardness and broke it. On the North side of the island, close to the port you will find permian to early Triassic sediments. There I collected a (rock?) fragment of coral. On the south side of the island, you will observe Cretaceous formations with some fossilised corals. The place is called Melidoni beach. (Παραλία Μελιδόνι) 36.1586538, 22.9481317 The formation is accessible with boat or swimming as it is located across the beach. Thus, no photos.. If you visit it, don't let Google deceive you. Follow the local signs since Google will lead you 3kms North. Since this post has to do with Greece I will include some Greek search keywords, in case someone might be looking info for this area. Ελλάδα, Κύθηρα, απολιθώματα, Μητάτα Κενοζωικός Since tourism has become a little complicated lately, I may visit the place again in October. Hope you enjoy the post. If you visit the island, don't miss the chance to eat at Mihalis Tavern Mitata
  4. A friend has an odd fossil that appears to be a fruit. It's from a Miocene coal deposit in Germany. The tag says Magnoliaspermum sp. There doesn't seem to be much about this genus on the web though I did find a reference to a species, M. geinitzii. Is it a form genus for fruits that may be associated with magnolias or is it an extinct genus related to magnolias or something else? I don't know a lot about fossil plants other than the general history and I don't have a reference for it. The formation is given as Braunkohle Lignite but "Braunkohle" is the German word for lignite so I think there's a misunderstanding on that one. Jess
  5. I wanted to ask if any fossils have been found in Coastal Canyon Park in Newport Coast, California, because most of the sediments in Orange County are Cenozoic in age (for example, the fossil otariid Eotaria and the fossil walruses Gomphotaria pugnax and Titanotaria orangensis have been found in the Miocene of Orange County).
  6. Aurora, NC Vertebra

    I found this vertebra several years ago in the fossil pit next to the Aurora Fossil Museum. I initially classified the vertebra as whale, but as I go back through my collection, I am beginning to doubt my identification. After doing my own research I think I have been able to narrow it down to Odontocete, but I was curious if there is a way to narrow it further. Perhaps dolphin? But again, these are only guesses. The pattern on one side of the vertebra is very interesting; you can see it in the second photo.
  7. Need some help with shark tooth ID

    Hello to all of you, I would like to kindly as you about your opinion, because recently I have started to sort out my collection of shark teeth and I was hoping maybe here I will find someone who could help me with some ID's. I have found this shark tooth, which is not exactly small in the southern Slovakia. Age: lower miocene (Eggenburg). My guess is that it could be Isurus retroflexus, but I'm not sure. As you can see the tip was broken long time ago before I have found it. Please see the pictures attached. Any input will be welcome. Wish you a nice day. Gabriel.
  8. Shark teeth from Antwerp

    Hello! Could you please help me identify this shark teeth? They're from Antwerp, so I guess they're Neogene in age. Thanks in advance!
  9. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  10. Human impact on nature 'dates back millions of years' By Helen Briggs, BBC News, January 20, 2020 https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-51068816 The open access paper is: Faurby, S., Silvestro, D., Werdelin, L. and Antonelli, A., Brain expansion in early hominins predicts carnivore extinctions in East Africa. Ecology Letters. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ele.13451 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31943670 Yours, Paul H.
  11. Hello all, A quick question. Do you guys have some recommendations in regards with literature about 'Neogene fossils', that could help me with identification of the finds? All I found was this one, but I don't know the author so I'm skeptical: https://www.amazon.sg/Cenozoic-Fsils-II-Bruce-Stinchcomb/dp/0764335804 Thank you for the answers
  12. Feather from the neogene

    Hi guys, Last week I was on a vacation in Balchik on the northern coast of the black sea and I visited a small fossil site there. It's a small shoreline littered with mudstone and limestone (I think). Previously there I have been finding bones of sea mammals but this time I found something even more interesting... From what I can tell it's a feather. I just wanted to ask you if you can confirm that it's a feather. I was also wandering if there is anyway that it is a modern birds feather somehow imprinted on the fallen rock. Happy New Year to everyone !!!
  13. 15 Million Years of California Birds

    Peter Kloess, 15 Million Years of Bird History: A Specimen-based Approach to Reconstructing the Late Neogene Bird Communities of California August 14, 2015, Masters of Science degree in Geology, California State University, Fullerton. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bmd5GpnHz54 For the people interested in California geology and what a thesis defense looks like, other California State University, Fullerton geology thesis defenses are at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXgKDqubcNoj2u6KmE90npOsGNaL_Seo2 Yours, Paul H.
  14. What is it (Ukraine)?

    What is it? Western Ukraine, Lviv region. Neogene, Miocene.
  15. Shark tooth (Ukraine)?

    Hello! Help with ID please. Western Ukraine, Lviv region. Neogene, Miocene.
  16. Three! Identical mystery bones

    Update: we now have three samples of this fossil. These really perplex me. They have almost mathematically straight, shallow, ridged channels on one side. No serrations on the edges. i had been grouping them with my sting ray and skate fossils, but just realized that I haven’t seen any pics that look like these two. Is that what they are? Or is it something more... nefarious? Both are from Aurora. Thanks frank
  17. Hi, I've collected this fossil on a beach near Balchik in Bulgaria and have wandered what it is. On the same beach I've also found small parts of bones and a partial vertebrae. Since there have been previous finds from Deinotherium bavaricum , Trilophodon angus-tidens and Choerolophodon pentelici in the region I was pretty exited that I've found a part of a tusk or one from a baby, but I am really not sure what exactly the fossil is. Please if you have any good guesses for the origin of the fossil please let me know.
  18. Shark Week on the Discovery Channel starts tonight and one of the shows is about C. megalodon. It's on at 8pm Eastern and Pacific time.
  19. GMR find that has me clueless

    Hey-oh! I found this while at GMR and I'm clueless as to what (if anything) it is. I've been though my fossil books and online but the curvature and the indention marks have me puzzled. I've not found something like this before. My luck it is a weird curious rock.. if it is, I'm just going to imagine it's a meg eye lid or something hahaha As always, I welcome your thoughts and appreciate you all Steve
  20. Hello! Help please with identification of these fossils. I understand that a lot of them are not identyfieble, but may be not all :-) Thanks in advance!
  21. Decapod claw or pseudofossil?

    99% sure this is just a rock, but the shape just keeps me wondering... Found along the beach of Stratford Hall in Montross, Virginia on 7/6/19. Any thoughts?
  22. Found these imprints in the island of Rhodes (Greece). The age of the cediment according to geological maps of the area is upper Pliocene to lower Pleistocene. The units on the scale are cm. I wonder if my assumptions about pine cones are correct (even considered cycad cones) having read about pine cone specimens being found on the island. Would be really happy if someone could pinpoint the species from the shape of indentations - in the first image which is the most detailed there appears to be a small hole in the center of what I suppose are the cone scales. This can also be seen in the second image, though the structure is in worse shape probably due to being exposed for a long time.
  23. Bivalves from Madagascar

    Hi everyone, I went to a small rock shop some time ago and bought these three fossil bivalves. Unfortunately, the only information they had on them was that they were from Madagascar. More importantly than the species, I'd really like to find out a more precise location and age (including formation) for them. There were 6 shells available in the shop (all clearly from the same location). 4 of them were #1, then #2 and #3 were unique. #1: I think it's something from the Mactridae family.
  24. Fish teeth? Any ideas?

    We have found these on the same samples where we found some shark and ray teeth... it looks like teleost teeth?! Grid scale (5 mm) Any ideas?
  25. Ray teeth? Pt2

    I need help identifying this piece of dental plaque from a ray. Any ideas?
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