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Found 5 results

  1. On the use and abuse of ancient DNA.

    On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 18, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03773-6 Some related articles are: Editorial: On the use and abuse of ancient DNA. Researchers in several disciplines need to tread carefully over shared landscapes of the past. Nature 555, 559 (2018) https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03857-3 sex, power and ancient DNA. Turi King hails David Reich’s thrilling account of mapping humans through time and place. Ewen Callaway, Nature. March 13, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02964-5 and Ancient-genome study finds Bronze Age ‘Beaker culture’ invaded Britain. Famous bell-shaped pots associated with group of immigrants who may have displaced Neolithic farmers. Ewen Callaway, Nature, May 17, 2017 https://www.nature.com/news/ancient-genome-study-finds-bronze-age-beaker-culture-invaded-britain-1.21996 Yours, Paul H.
  2. Did humans domesticate dogs once, or twice?

    Prehistoric fossils suggest modern dogs evolved from a single population of wolves Did humans domesticate dogs once, or twice? by Rachel Becker, the Verge, Jul 18, 2017 https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/18/15992572/dog-genetics-archaeology-fossils-evolution-domestication-wolves https://www.nature.com/news/ancient-genomes-heat-up-dog-domestication-debate-1.22320 The papers are: Frantz, L.A., Mullin, V.E., Pionnier-Capitan, M., Lebrasseur, O., Ollivier, M., Perri, A., Linderholm, A., Mattiangeli, V., Teasdale, M.D., Dimopoulos, E.A. and Tresset, A., 2016. Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs. Science, 352(6290), pp.1228-1231. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/352/6290/1228 https://hal-univ-rennes1.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01326370/document Botigue, L., Song, S., Scheu, A., Gopalan, S., Pendleton, A., Oetjens, M., Taravella, A., Seregély, T., Zeeb-Lanz, A., Arbogast, R.M. and Bobo, D., 2016. Ancient European dog genomes reveal continuity since the early Neolithic. Biorxiv, p.068189. https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms16082 http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/08/07/068189 http://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2016/08/05/068189.full.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  3. H, The family and I spent a lovely week at Walton on the Naze in Essex, UK. As it was the Easter break the site was very busy with collectors young and old, but we still managed to find some interesting pieces. The site itself is London Clay (c53my) with a junction bed above from which whale bone and Megalodon teeth can be found. Above this is the distinctive Red Crag (c.2my). Lastly are glacial deposits and later from which Neolithic and Roman finds have been found over the years. The site is rapidly eroding at a rate of about a metre a year however there are daily land slips and falls so whether that rate is accelerating its hard to say. Most of the finds are in the shingle and with my eyes I had to adopt the 'hands and knees crawl' technique to see anything other than a blur of shapes. All of the finds below (with the exception of the potential neolithic finds) are from the London Clay sediments. The Site: We found a lot of striatolamia shark teeth. Its possible there are other species within this, however we haven't had time to have a detailed look at each tooth yet: Two nice Otodus shark teeth were found by my wife: A pair of what we believe are well worn ray dentition plates. They were hard to photograph so apologies for the lack of clarity: On a previous trip a few weeks ago we also found this. Both turtle and bird bone have been found on this site. Could this be either?: I've included a fossilised twig and a seed that I picked up. The beach is littered with these and tend to be ignored by the fossil hunters as they are so common. I like them: Lastly I've included two interesting finds. The ball is from Walton and the 'spear point' was from Dovercourt just up the coast. In an archaeological context these might be exciting finds - the ball is similar to others that have been described as hammer stones, gaming pieces or sling shots. The 'spear point' shows signs of rework along both edges. Out of context, within the beach shingle, they are just interesting stones but I thought I'd share them anyway: Any comments would be appreciated. Happy Hunting! Carl
  4. Mystery tooth and bone

    I'm an amateur collector from the east of England and for about 2 years I've been finding Neolithic flints and pottery, horse and cow teeth etc in a small area of woodland that was formerly a river bank near where I live. It's probably not that exciting to you guys as the local archaeology department dated the finds to between 4 and 10 thousand years ago and then lost interest, apparently Neolithic in my area is just too common. But it's still exciting to me and in amongst my finds I have 2 things that I would really like to identify and understand better so I am hoping you experts will be able to help. The first is a tooth - when the archaeology people first saw it they immediately said it was human but it is not a molar and has 2 roots. I'm thinking pig maybe...??? The second find came later, a small bone: is it human toe or finger bone? It is not quite fossilised and was preserved in clay - if it IS human, would it fit in with the same people whose pottery and flint tools I keep finding or would it be more recent? My thanks in advance for any help you can give, S
  5. Ancient Hand Axe?

    Hi guys, I found this and felt I should share and see what you think: Ancient Hand Axe? First, I was struck by the 'cutting edge', which seems used, and has radiating shock marks from the edge, inward. There also seems to be debris in the cutting area, one piece contains 2 small, thin inset hairs, light brown in color, which I've bagged. The ergonomics are amazing. The mass of the stone fits neatly in your hand, while there appear to be wear marks where your index finger and thumb might go. Also, when held in that manner, the cutting edge is parallel to your cutting surface.
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