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Found 35 results

  1. Hi all, Upon examining some of my finds from this hunt about a month ago, I realized that there was an anomaly on one of the Neuropteris ovata pinnules. Initially I brushed it off as nothing more than an anomaly, but last night while I was doing some reading I came upon an intriguing paper on insect galls from the Carboniferous. Some of the gall fossils included bore a striking resemblance to the gall on my frond, and so I figured I would make a post to see if any of you had an idea on what it could be. Here is the frond, in full view: Closer inspection of one of the pinnules reveals a small, oval-shaped bump: This bears a striking resemblance to some of the galls included in this paper (it is not paywalled). Specifically, it resembles #7 in the first figure. I hesitated to include the image directly in this topic so as to not violate any Forum rules (if it is not a violation I can include it here as a reply). https://www.researchgate.net/publication/250613622_The_Seeds_on_Padgettia_readi_are_Insect_Galls_Reassignment_of_the_Plant_to_Odontopteris_the_Gall_to_Ovofoligallites_N_Gen_and_the_Evolutionary_Implications_Thereof Although it superficially resembles a gall, I am looking for other opinions as I have no experience in this field. Here are my thoughts on why it could, or could not be a gall: It could possibly be a gall for multiple reasons. First off, the morphological similarity is quite striking. Secondly, the paper states that ", occurs commonly on a variety of seed-fern foliage throughout the late Middle Pennsylvanian to Early Permian". This is from a late Pennsylvanian deposit (Connellsville Sandstone of the Conemaugh group) so it fits quite nicely into that time frame. Also, epibionts are quite common in this deposit, specifically Microconchus. They are preserved in a relatively similar fashion (mold-cast). There are a few reasons why it could also not be a gall. First of all, I have never heard of galls coming from deposits in the Appalachian basin, though this may simply be due to my own ignorance and/or a lack of literature. Also, this anomaly is isolated, which is a derivation seen from many of the galls included in the above paper. Finally, random nodules and concretions do occur sporadically throughout this deposit, so it could always be mineral growth. And finally, my simple lack of knowledge prevents me from making a confident ID either way. So, what do you all think? I'd love to hear some of your opinions as to what it could be! And on the off chance that it is a gall, should this specimen be donated?
  2. Carboniferous fossil ID

    I have this fossil here which at first glance I perceived to be some kind of seed, however I’m not sure. These are both from the same individual, just the positive and negative sides. It is just shy of half an inch long. It was found in the North Attleboro section of the Rhode Island formation
  3. Fossil Fern.

    Macroneuropteris macrophylla, a Neuropteris-like group seed fern, or Fern. Not sure if the matrix is shale. Could this be from Mazon Creek. Illinois? 4 x 3 5/8th x 2 1/2 inch. I am rather sure it is North American. Macroneuropteris macrophylla, a Neuropteris-like group seed fern or Fern. Age: ca 314 Mya
  4. Need help with ID

    I’ve just recently found this fossil in the North Attleboro fossil locality and need help identifying, it is a little bit longer than a half inch
  5. Hello! and I hope you are having a wonderful afternoon! I found these two plant fossils and was unsure to what they might actually be. They look a lot like modern seeds but I know I am not always informed and I keep having a slight suspicion they could be apart of some other plant material! If anyone could help identify and confirm these plant fossils I would be very grateful! I have found leaves from Neuropteris sp , Cyclopteris sp, and a few other plant species in these types of limestone! Info that I could gather: Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Possibly Upper Winterset Limestone Specimen #1: Two halves of one seed? (roughly 9mm) Other half: Specimen #2: Larger and wider seed? (roughly 3mm) I unfortunately do not have the other half to this one!
  6. Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

  7. Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of my favorite finds comes in at roughly 2.8cm and has two beautiful leaves next to each other!
  8. What could this be?

    I found this fossil in the north attleboro part of the rhode island formation, and I need help with an ID. It’s just shy of an inch in length.
  9. A very small group of us ventured into the wilds of northern PA last weekend, equipped with masks and a permit to poke around a state wildlife preserve with Carboniferous Lewellyn Formation exposures. It was a gorgeous day and the colors of the limestone really shone in the sunlight. As we got there, a pair of permit-less fossil poachers were just leaving. How do I know that they didn't have a permit? Because they absolutely did not follow the rules. Since it is a wildlife preserve, it is important that anyone looking for fossils not leave craterous holes in the ground and replant any plants that were uprooted in the process of digging said holes. They left holes everywhere. Our intrepid permit holder filled in most of the holes so that she could keep getting permits in the future. For this reason, I'm not going to be any more specific about the location. That said, there were so many wonderful plant fossils to find! The site is remarkable for its red, orange and yellow limestone, which makes for some terrific, high-contrast fossils. Many of them had crisp details. What's more, there was quite a variety.
  10. Alethopteris decurrens & Neuropteris

    From the album Flora

    From Calonne-Ricouart, Pas-de-Calais, France. Recieved on a trade with Gery (Nala). Thank you.
  11. Pecopteris sp.

    From the album Flora

    From Calonne-Ricouart, Pas-de-Calais, France. Recieved on a trade with Gery (Nala). Thank you.
  12. Alethopteris decurrens & Neuropteris

    From the album Flora

    From Calonne-Ricouart, Pas-de-Calais, France. Recieved on a trade with Gery (Nala). Thank you.
  13. Large neuropteris frond?

    found this piece in a CP(early P or late C) stratum west of beijing, China, in which the most common stuff is neuropteris ovata. The vein is obvously neuropteris type, as can be seen easly under the sun, if not in the pic. The stem is about 5mm wide, which can be used as the scale. I have never seen neuropteris with this shape and size.
  14. Conditions in Western PA have been unusually warm recently, with highs in the 40s and 50s. I decided to take advantage of this warm spell by getting a little bit of fossil hunting in. I decided to do a hunt focused on plants as I’ve been hunting for vertebrates for the better part of the last year and a half and, although I could never get tired of vertebrates I thought some variety was well overdue. So I headed to one of my favorite plant localities in the area. It is located in the Connellsville Sandstone of the Casselman Formation, which is in turn the upper half of the Conemaugh Group. The sandstone is around 305 million years old. The Casselman Formation holds the record of the tail end of one of the largest plant extinctions in our earths history. The prolonged wetness that had existed for much of the Pennsylvanian gave way to dryer conditions, and, as a result, the lycopsid forests fragmented. Many of these lycopsids went extinct during this event, which is known as the Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse. Conifers took advantage of these newly opened ecological niches. Their fossils have been found in this area, although I have never personally found them. Anyway, on to the fossils. Today I mostly found partial Pecopteris fronds, Neuropteris pinnules and Annularia leaflets. I’m going to include some of my better finds from other trips as well, as this trip was rather unproductive. Pictured below is the best Annularia I found today. Or Asterophyllites. I’m not sure. We’ll just go with Calamites leaves for now.
  15. First trip to Centralia, PA

    I had my first taste of the Carboniferous period. I made the trip to Centralia PA for a look at the fossils there. I went to coal deposit up the road from the cemetery on 2nd street ( pic below ). Centralia was not a "ghost town" not when I was there. There was a lot of people around. Many looked like they where their for the Graffiti Highway and other for some kind of four wheel event across the street from the spot I was at. The Shale was very soft and I had a hard time picking up anything bigger than 2 inches. I pulled away 3 layer but still had the same problem. I don't know if it would be them same if a kept going. Over all the sit was easy to find, and had a good view. With many fossil to pick from.
  16. Neuropteris Hash Plate

    From the album Massachusetts Fossils

    Various Neuropteris sp. Found in 2018 in North Attleborough, Massachusetts.
  17. Arkansas ferns x3 and Annularia ID.

    These were fossils my dad found over 20 years ago I think and gave to me maybe 10 yrs ago. I had completely forgotten about them. My dad use to be a land man for an oil and gas company. So he traveled the area extensively trying to get leases to drill for gas. I believe they are from somewhere near Mansfield, Arkansas from the Atoka or McAlester formations, both of which are Pennsylvanian. Any my help with ID would be greatly appreciated. First Piece The longest blade is about 55 mm long by 13 mm wide. A close up of some of the blades on the left side. I think there are 2 varieties here, not sure if the arching one is like the ones in the center and to the left of it. The center one is the top side of the blade and the one to the left and arching one appear to be the underside of the blades. It’s cool to be able to see that much detail. Then there is a different variety on the top left corner. I’ll take some close ups of those and post in a bit. A pic of the right side a bit closer up. I think in this pic there are at least 3 varieties of ferns. The ones on the top right pointing downwards which may be the same as those on the top left above. Then the long blade in the center running vertically. I think it is the only one of its kind represented on this plate. Then at the bottom running mostly horizontally. I have no clue as to the genus or even group of Medullosans. If I had to guess I’d say Neuropteris for all 3, but it’s a wild guess. Second piece is an Annularia of some kind I believe. You can se the long slender stems and then many long, slender leaves, which appear to have numerous veins running the length of the leaf. They are all cross crossing each other so it’s a bit chaotic to try to isolate one cluster. This is the back side. It has a couple stems running across it. There is more stuff in between layers on both pieces.
  18. This afternoon I was able to shoot down to North Attleborough to spend a few hours digging through carboniferous aged rock outcrops. It was a nice change of pace from my usual spots down in Rhode Island! The plant fossils here also preserve much better. My favorite find of the day was a plate covered in various Neuropterids. I'll have to explore southern MA more.
  19. Neuropteris sp

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Neuropteris Leaf Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Neuropteris is an extinct seed fern that existed in the Carboniferous period, known only from fossils. Major species include Neuropteris loschi. It is a fairly common fossil in bituminous coal with Alethopteris and similar ferns, especially in the Carboniferous Alleghany Mountains of Pennsylvania, they can be found near St. Clair, Pennsylvania. One common leaf fossil found during the Carboniferous was once called Neuropteris scheuchzeri. In 1989, it was reclassified as Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri. This specimen looks like Neuropteris loschi Kingdom: Plantae Division: †Pteridospermatophyta Order: †Medullosales Family: †Neurodontopteridaceae Genus: †Neuropteris
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