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Found 14 results

  1. Neuropteris Hash Plate

    From the album Massachusetts Fossils

    Various Neuropteris sp. Found in 2018 in North Attleborough, Massachusetts.
  2. Arkansas ferns x3 and Annularia ID.

    These were fossils my dad found over 20 years ago I think and gave to me maybe 10 yrs ago. I had completely forgotten about them. My dad use to be a land man for an oil and gas company. So he traveled the area extensively trying to get leases to drill for gas. I believe they are from somewhere near Mansfield, Arkansas from the Atoka or McAlester formations, both of which are Pennsylvanian. Any my help with ID would be greatly appreciated. First Piece The longest blade is about 55 mm long by 13 mm wide. A close up of some of the blades on the left side. I think there are 2 varieties here, not sure if the arching one is like the ones in the center and to the left of it. The center one is the top side of the blade and the one to the left and arching one appear to be the underside of the blades. It’s cool to be able to see that much detail. Then there is a different variety on the top left corner. I’ll take some close ups of those and post in a bit. A pic of the right side a bit closer up. I think in this pic there are at least 3 varieties of ferns. The ones on the top right pointing downwards which may be the same as those on the top left above. Then the long blade in the center running vertically. I think it is the only one of its kind represented on this plate. Then at the bottom running mostly horizontally. I have no clue as to the genus or even group of Medullosans. If I had to guess I’d say Neuropteris for all 3, but it’s a wild guess. Second piece is an Annularia of some kind I believe. You can se the long slender stems and then many long, slender leaves, which appear to have numerous veins running the length of the leaf. They are all cross crossing each other so it’s a bit chaotic to try to isolate one cluster. This is the back side. It has a couple stems running across it. There is more stuff in between layers on both pieces.
  3. This afternoon I was able to shoot down to North Attleborough to spend a few hours digging through carboniferous aged rock outcrops. It was a nice change of pace from my usual spots down in Rhode Island! The plant fossils here also preserve much better. My favorite find of the day was a plate covered in various Neuropterids. I'll have to explore southern MA more.
  4. Neuropteris sp

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Neuropteris Leaf Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Neuropteris is an extinct seed fern that existed in the Carboniferous period, known only from fossils. Major species include Neuropteris loschi. It is a fairly common fossil in bituminous coal with Alethopteris and similar ferns, especially in the Carboniferous Alleghany Mountains of Pennsylvania, they can be found near St. Clair, Pennsylvania. One common leaf fossil found during the Carboniferous was once called Neuropteris scheuchzeri. In 1989, it was reclassified as Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri. This specimen looks like Neuropteris loschi Kingdom: Plantae Division: †Pteridospermatophyta Order: †Medullosales Family: †Neurodontopteridaceae Genus: †Neuropteris
  5. Can't help with the initial question but when checking the seller's offerings I just had to spontaneously buy a fern fossil as it looked so amazing and the price seemed also very ok! I've never bought a plant fossil before but also never seen a Carboniferous fossil which looked so well preserved and colorful to me. Oddly I can't find any of these anywhere else on the web and hardly any information about the locality. Does anyone have any information about the locality or the formation? Greetings from Germany
  6. Multiple Plants A.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Multiple Plant Fossil - Neuropteris, Pecopteris, Annularia Plant, other leaves. *Two-sided fossil Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fossils on both sides of specimen. This fine specimen shows two leaflets of Calamites, a member of the Calamitales which belong to the Sphenophytes. Whorls of small leaflets are arranged concentrically around a thin stem and are called Annularia or Asterophyllites. Calamites itself is the name originally given to a stem section, but now applies to the entire plant. These were indicative of humid to wet habitats such as along rivers and lake shores. There appears to be small "branches" of calamites as well. Also on this piece, Neuropteris leaflets - they are usually blunt tipped and are attached by a single stem as opposed by the entire base, like Pecopteris. Also, Neuropteris has an overall heartshape. Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. Kingdom: Plantae
  7. Multiple Plants A.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Multiple Plant Fossil - Neuropteris, Pecopteris, Annularia Plant, other leaves. *Two-sided fossil Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fossils on both sides of specimen. This fine specimen shows two leaflets of Calamites, a member of the Calamitales which belong to the Sphenophytes. Whorls of small leaflets are arranged concentrically around a thin stem and are called Annularia or Asterophyllites. Calamites itself is the name originally given to a stem section, but now applies to the entire plant. These were indicative of humid to wet habitats such as along rivers and lake shores. There appears to be small "branches" of calamites as well. Also on this piece, Neuropteris leaflets - they are usually blunt tipped and are attached by a single stem as opposed by the entire base, like Pecopteris. Also, Neuropteris has an overall heartshape. Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. Kingdom: Plantae
  8. Lepidodendron aand Odontopteris

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Imprint of a Lepidodendron branch and Odontopteris reichiana pinnules. Found in 2016 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  9. Misidentified fern fossil?

    I purchased this fern fossil some years ago from a rock shop in Colorado. It was identified as a Neuropteris sp. from the Braidwood formation, Johnson County, Missouri, from the Pennsylvanian period. I have several questions. First, when I do a Google search I see quite a number of fern fossils being offered for sale with the same provenance. But when I dive deeper, I can't find a Braidwood formation listed for Johnson County, Missouri. Here is the USGS listing of geologic units in Johnson County, and I don't see a Braidwood formation listed: https://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/fips-unit.php?code=f29101. The only Braidwood I have found on Google is the Braidwood biota, part of the Mazon Creek fossil beds in Illinois. Has this been misidentified or am I missing something? Also, I'm not sure I can tell the difference between neuropteris and pecopteris species, can anyone give me a good identification? Thanks! 12X magnification: 25X magnification:
  10. Lepidodendron

    From the album My Collection

    Here is another plant material plate I found over at Cory's Lane, Rhode Island. This medium sized plate has a lepidodendron branch going through the middle with calamites and neuropteris leaves around the edges of the matrix.
  11. Mystery Imprint in Plant Material

    With winter in New England fast approaching, I decided to spend the afternoon at Cory's Lane in Rhode Island. I found a number of Pennsylvanian aged plant imprints, but one plate of Neuropteris imprints has me stumped. This plate has a mystery object in it (A mystery to me at least). The long imprint going down the middle of this plate looks like an imprint of a stick, but I had thought sticks didn't preserve well in the Rhode Island Formation. Can anyone id the large, straight shaped imprint? Thanks!
  12. Dear all, On the website of the Université de Lille 1, you can obtain digital copies of dissertations free of charge. The database also includes older works, including what I think is a fantastic series on Carboniferous plants, named "Houillères du bassin du Nord et du Pas-de-Calais, I. Flore fossile". Below I've added direct links to the five volumes (dissertations) in the series, each dealing with a major group of "fern-like fronds". While some of the works are a bit dated, the plates are marvellous and the descriptions still rather useful. Perhaps some of you could be interested, hence the notification. http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/notice/view/univ-lille1-ori-44098 1e fascicule, Danzé-Corsin (1953) Marioptéridées http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/notice/view/univ-lille1-ori-60409 2e fascicule, Danzé (1956) Sphénoptéridiennes http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/notice/view/univ-lille1-ori-44880 3e fascicule, Dalinval (1960) Pécoptéridées http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/notice/view/univ-lille1-ori-45254 4e fascicule, Buisine (1961) Aléthoptéridées http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/notice/view/univ-lille1-ori-50172 5e fascicule, Laveine (1967) Neuroptéridées Note that the files are considerably large, and may take some time to load... To all likeliness, the Université de Lille 1 dissertation database contains interesting works dealing with other fossil groups as well. Those who are interested could browse the database here: http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/thematic-search.html?menuKey=these&submenuKey=authors&id=indexed_authors Here are a couple other interesting dissertations I ran into: http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/notice/view/univ-lille1-ori-120383 Bertrand (1909) Études sur la fronde des Zygoptéridées http://ori.univ-lille1.fr/notice/view/univ-lille1-ori-38614 Lemoigne (1961) Études analytiques et comparées des structures internes des sigillaires Happy reading/browsing! Cheers, Tim
  13. Pittsburgh PA. I need to get a better camera.... The nodule (?) has a vein like pattern in it, and the other an area of perfectly straight lines. Hope pics are good enough to maybe ID. Also not sure if the second one is just an imprint.... Thought? http://www.thefossilforum.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/smile.png
  14. We collected these Neuropteris fern leaves and stems, and Annularia (Calamite tree) leaves at McIntyre Mountain in June 2012. This site is at the very top of the mountain, where the coal pits have been reclaimed and converted to a forested park. The veins of the leaves show up very clearly in the closeup photos.
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