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Found 69 results

  1. Alaska Fossil Sites

    Hoping to head up to Alaska this next summer and would love to hunt for fossils. Does anyone know of a list of sites to start looking? Thanks!
  2. Lauderdale/ Limestone County line

    I’m VERY new to this but have had some luck( I think). I had them all separated but with the storms came a strong enough wind that a piece of a tree that my husband uses in his hand built smoke knocked the leg off my table and boom there they went and then had to chase my protectors to get some back. Anyway, does it make since that all the different items would be found in a very small section of my yard. The dog house is farther away. It may take a minute to up load the pics. Of course if you want to help ID any I would give you a Dixie land, “Bless You, child, Bless You!”
  3. I am looking for crinoid sites near BG Ky. I am new here. I found my first ever crinoid in landscape gravel and am obsessed! Hope its OK to ask this?
  4. Any ideas what this is ?

    I found this one in the same location of a few other confirmed fossils, is it just a rock or should I investigate this further?
  5. Corals?

    Hi everyone! I retook some photos with the tips I was given (Thankyou) found in a riverbed, Alberta, Canada
  6. Fossil or no fossil

    Hi everyone! Mega mega newbie here and I’m not even sure if I got my hand on real fossils or not. So would appreciate any information and suggestions, thankyou
  7. Hi all! I'm a hobby hunter who normally visits Penn Dixie near Buffalo NY for my fossils where they tell me what everything is if I can't ID it myself. But my mom went for a hike recently in our creek (Groveland, Livingston County, NY, USA) and came back with these three fossils. At least, we're pretty sure they're fossils! I'm sorry that the measurements are in inches, my mom doesn't have anything with metric measurements on it. Each square is 1inch (~2.5cm) I tried to give her the best instructions to take pictures like the pinned post, and this is what I got lol. I'm going to attach them each to separate messages so they don't get all jumbled. Here's the first one:
  8. Don’t worry, fossil collecting sites are all around, and may be easier to find than you might think! Here in my area of Kentucky, we have landscape rock that is sold as “local river rock” at about every garden/landscape center. This “local river rock” contains a lot of fossils. From brachiopods, to horns (corals), and bryozoans, etc. It is also very inexpensive. Many people in my area also use crushed limestone as a covering for driveways and parking areas. I have found many a trilobite in someone’s driveway. Finding fossils this way isn’t the most glamorous or scientific, but for someone new, or someone who is thinking about starting to collect, it may just be the spark that gets them into it. Finding a few fossils this way is what brought me back to the hobby. It’s a lot easier to ask a friend/family member to give up a rock out of their driveway or landscaping than to ask a complete stranger to go dig around on their property. What are some of the other newbie friendly “sites” are that you have come across? P.S. I’ll try and post a few pictures of some of my finds when I get a chance later tonight.
  9. Leaf or Insect Wing?

    I’m not sure what I have here, I might have found this either in my backyard or in a nearby creek... I’m guessing that it was the creek. I was looking for rocks for my pond (2006). The fossil did not appear until a year or two later and I always wondered what it was. It measures 95mm x 35mm. Any clue would be greatly appreciated. thanks in advance. JD
  10. Hi! I am new to this forum and really new to this hobby. I have a newbie somehow silly question, so correct me if I am wrong, but a fossil of a trilobite is the exoskeleton that was permineralized, so anything organic on the trilobite was replaced with inorganic materials and thus the whole body was preserved through years, my question would be what about the insides of the fossil, with an exray can we see insides or there are no insides any more?
  11. Bone fossil?

    Hello, newbie here. I was digging in my flowerbed and found this. It is 5" long and about 1.4" diameter but not quite round. I'm near Tampa, gulf coast. Is there enough to hazard a guess what it is? Thanks!
  12. So I just started playing with fossil prep and wanted to share what I have learned so far. I have a bunch of air tools coming in but couldn't wait to start so I started using my hand tools. I work with silver so I have quite a few. The wooden handled set is from online auction and cost under $9. The silver soldering pick I can't remember. I have 4 small Symphysops that were sent to me unprepped, 3 of which are in a softer shale. The matrix of the other one is more crystalline and too hard for hand tools. I did my homework like any good fossil lover regarding hand prep (or any prep for that matter) but found out very quickly that it's a hands on learning experience. The way the matrix rock responds to tools and the hardness of it vs. the fossil are something you can only know in person. As I am brand new to all fossils I was terrified to take tool to rock for the first time. I chose my least complete specimen to get a feel for it so that if I ruined anything I wouldn't be too heart broken. For any person brand new the excitement and terror comes in equal measure! After staring at the rocks and test poking with different tools for at least an hour, I finally felt ready. (Okay not READY, but I was never going to be ready!) First I established a perimeter about .5-1cm away from the fossil. I used a strait pick to dig a small border down into the matrix to establish the area I was looking to remove. I will be removing the trilobite from the matrix completely for a project so I decided to dig down around it and will eventually go under it to free it completely. I found that using a plaque scaling tool works very well for scraping away sections to create a "plane" around the fossil. For the edges I first tried a strait pick but quickly figured out that if I gently moved down and away from the fossil with a semi-blunt spade shaped tool it would uncover the edges better without hurting the trilobite. I do this a bit then switch over to a modified round pick that I curved to smooth around the perimeter of exposed fossil material to clear away ridges and dust to see how much I have exposed so I don't go to far or too deep with the spade. So far I have exposed the top and about half of the sides of the trilobite and have caused no damage. As I said the matrix is pretty soft so no heavy pressure is needed. Every minute or so I stop to blow the dust off and brush the fossil with a velvet cloth to get a look at where I am at. I was given the advice to stop every 15 minutes or so to rest my eyes and move around and have found this to be invaluable advice. After staring up close at the fossil for 20min my vision gets super blurry and takes a couple of minutes to return to normal. I find that when I come back I notice details I didn't before and it helps me chose my next move. Every time I stop I stand up, stretch my back and neck, touch my toes, flex my hands and wrists, and then go limp for a minute before returning to the fossil. I have to say I am loving the "focused relaxation" (fellow member's term) of working on a small specimen by hand and can see myself continuing to do it regularly even after I get my tools. It does wonders for my PTSD and am shocked to say it is even more effective than meditation or CBT. I will update as I go and learn and if I get into trouble. I hope this can serve as a starting place for other new people and would love to get tips and advice in the comments for me and future readers.
  13. Any thoughts are appreciated

    Brand new to the site but I've been fossil hunting around Texas for years. I've mainly found shark teeth and shells but never a bone. I Found this in a creekbed in Bandera TX sticking out from the bank. Its not very heavy for the size but the exposed end is fairly brittle. Any thoughts or knowledge shared is greatly appreciated! I have more pics but could not upload them.
  14. Have we found a bone?

    Ok, so we searched and searched today. We FINALLY found a roadside shale bank, saw a few ferns and Cordiates (I’m learning) So we pulled this piece, split it and got a beauty of a fern. Then.... this fell out. It looks like a bone?!?! But I’m fully prepared to accept it’s a branch. Let us know.....
  15. Here’s the first fossils I’ve ever found! Found in Webster County, West Virginia. Where they hollow out a road. The stone is shale from my knowledge..... I’d love to know it’s age and name? And, how to prep them.
  16. Hey! New member here wondering if anyone would be interested in getting a group together for the weekend to do some creek hunting for megs, angies, whites, or other fossils. Message me if you're interested and know the area better than I (I'm from the upstate).
  17. Back in November of last year, my son and I decided to start our own education non-profit. We wanted to combine his artwork, my teaching skills, and real fossils to create a museum on wheels that takes fun field trips to the classrooms. We had shark teeth and marine mammal fossils so we started building education programs around those. I am very satisfied where those two programs are at though I would love to expand the number of shark species we can present but that is a story for a different day. We knew we would need to get a dinosaur program going at some point but I know nothing about dinosaur fossils so I did not want to start collecting yet. My plan was to wait until late spring or early summer to start building our collection. A friend gave us two hadrosaur teeth and a Hypselosaurus egg shell piece in December so our program got started earlier than planned. As we do with every decision, my son and I talked about picking up a few bargain dinosaur fossils while we tightened up the other programs which are debuting in March. One of the first things I did was join TFF. I was very intimidated by dinosaur fossils and I hoped this place would help me educate myself. I have been a quiet observer so far and have not engaged very much with the dinosaur experts here. I have read a lot of posts and this has been so incredibly helpful. Utilizing the expertise of the members here has also saved me money and stopped me from making one unwise purchase. I have only picked up a few dinosaur items up to this point but without being on this site, I doubt I would have made any attempt at starting this particular collection so soon. I am very grateful for the forum and its members because a lot of people really want to help. I quickly learned that our presentation will be centered on the Hell Creek fauna and we can augment it with some African dinosaurs. After a bit of window shopping, it became apparent right away that Jurassic period dinosaurs were simply too expensive for us. There is no way we will be able to purchase any and trades are unlikely as we just do not have much material that would have much trade value. I can live with this though. If we focus on the T-rex/Ceratopsian fauna of Hell Creek we are giving kids species they know plus introducing them to new species which I am totally cool with. We also decided we could talk Triassic dinosaurs with kids using Bull Canyon fossils. Now I am an avid reader here so I am aware that there is some debate about the species that are found in Bull Canyon and how things are labeled by dealers but I did pick some up because we want to teach kids about the evolution of dinosaurs and to give them a few species that have never heard of. I can not be sure if the teeth I have are Coelophysis teeth but we are still going to present them as such to the students because it is an opportunity to get to early dinosaurs. Same goes for a "prosauropod" tooth we purchased. We are not going to sell the fossils so the correct ID is less important to us than being able to at least have a representation of early dinosaurs for the kiddos. Our early efforts were given a huge boost when a member here helped broker a transaction between another member which resulted in us having a very nice partial T-rex and a Nano. This was huge for us. We got the centerpiece species and it was super affordable. I am still in a bit of shock to be honest and incredibly grateful. We also picked up some inexpensive Hell Creek Triceratops teeth. I found a nice Saurornitholestes from Judith River which gives us a "raptor" fossil for the kids. I got an inexpensive Moroccan sauropod tooth which gives us a "long neck" that we can use. It is really not a bad start in my eyes. We picked some species that we really wanted to include. We also have begun to find some teeth that kids can handle in the form of partial or shed Ceratopsian teeth and inexpensive Spinosaurus teeth from Morocco. I only made one questionable decision. I did not use TFF and ended up misidentifying a tooth. This led us to having two Richardoesstesia gilmorei teeth. We really did not need two fossils from this species but it was a learning experience. I learned that I need keep studying, learning and using the forum. Had I put it here first, instead of testing my own skills, I would not have picked it up . I would have filled another need in the program. Lesson learned and the upside is that I do have a dinosaur fossil I can possibly trade. It is not much for trade I am sure, but maybe I can use it to get a fossil that fills a hole in the program. The most important thing I have learned so far is that I really enjoy collecting dinosaur fossils. I am hooked. I was never a dinosaur kid myself. I preferred sharks and whales but I am really captivated by dinosaurs now. I have been cramming my brain with scientific information about dinosaurs and my son is really enjoying getting a start on his dino artwork. We have a long way to go before we are ready to unleash our budding dino education program. I have a long way to go with my own knowledge too. I do know it will be a lot of fun to learn and I am looking forward to getting more interactive with the dinosaur collectors here. We have settled on the next round of dinosaurs to add (Acheroraptor, Ankylosaur, Pachycephalosaurus, a Troodontid, plus more Ceratopsian material) and they seem attainable so I am excited to get to work on those in the near future. I also learned there are species from the Hell Creek formation that are awesome but we will never have due to price or rarity lol Dakotaraptor is #1 on that list but the avian dinosaurs are not far behind. All things considered, I am super happy with our tiny dinosaur collection and I am really enjoying the hunt for more !!
  18. hi folks, I got this fossil from the Royal Ontario Museum in Canada. Can someone identify it please? Thanks!
  19. Possible fossil?

    Hello everyone hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving! My father got to work yesterday and found this during their construction job. He said it was 9ft underground and says that the black sphere is heavy like metal and popped right out of the rock. Is this a fossil? Thanks for any tips!
  20. Possible fossil?

    My father just found this today in North Texas at his job site, is this also an ammonite? It's pretty big. It was dug up 9ft under ground.
  21. Possible fossil?

    Hi everyone, I'm new here, so I want to apologize up front if my posts aren't as descriptive because I am very new to this. My father is currently working on a "construction" job, in north Texas that requires him to dig 9ft underground. He has found various things and he wants to know if they are fossils. Here is something he found yesterday: Thanks in advance!
  22. Please help id and inform me

    Hello i went to the river today in central alberta and found these fossils i believe one is petrified wood but it also has a translucent mineral in it?? I think?? And orange mineral around it which i assume is sap amber??? the size of these rocks are around a baseball please help identify all of them and offer info ill greatly appreciate it first two pictures are of opposite sides same as the other two.
  23. Is this anything other than a rock?

    Gday all, was wondering if this was an egg or a rock? I found it on a beach in Australia near the border of south Australia and Victoria when I was a kid, I cut it in half and just forgot about it for around 20 years!
  24. First Fossil Found!

    Hello, I am new to geology and fossil hunting. I have very little knowledge in this area and would love for somone to help me identify it! It is a snail incased in sedimentary rock, the shell itself has also turned to stone it seems. The snail is about 2 inches across, the rock itself it 4 inches at its longest point. I found it on surface level, on the side of a trail in the forest. I live in Montreal QC.
  25. Helpful for newbies...

    Hi, I hope this is ok to post here (still getting used to the site) I'm just starting out and have stumbled across this.. it's a free pdf download for an introduction in Paleontology.. I'm finding pretty interesting and helpful. I thought it might help out others in the same boat as I am. https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://pages.geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/g231/JacksonTest1.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjauJ2iyvTcAhXDCMAKHUvQBq0QFjAEegQIABAB&usg=AOvVaw1OqWyM4u6TgghOcwHsS5fH&cshid=1534525915866 If there's anything wrong with this post please let me know.
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