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Found 34 results

  1. Triarthrus finds

    Hello again! This post will be about some beautifully preserved Triarthrus fossils (and my first complete Trilobite finds). Some of them even have the eyes preserved! I found these at a local train station, and the site of significant construction lately. I believe most of the to be E. eotoni, and the last one to be E. rougensis or spinosus. It may not be visible in the picture, but the last one has a streak of pyrite along the side of its cephalon / upper thorax. Could this be some kind of soft body tissue preservation, similar to those of the Beecher's Trilobite bed?
  2. Fossil ID

    This may or may not actually be a fossil. It is a cylindrical, shimmering white streak on the Shale. It is only about an inch long. This may just be another mineral inclusion, or some discoloured sediment. Any help with identifying this would be appreciated!
  3. Ordovician Road Cut

    Yesterday, I was lucky enough to attend a very special field trip with the Eastern Ontario Natural History Society to a massive road cut in Ontario. The rock exposed was Ordovician aged limestone, and it produced some amazing fossils. I might need some id help with some of these. The giant cephalopod was by far the best thing I found! 1. Giant Cephalopod (with hand for scale) Camerocerad or Endoceras? 2. Crinoid stems, bryozoans and Gastropod 3. Partial trilobite pygidia
  4. Splitting Nodules And Concretions

    Hello TFF members! I have just found several strange circular rocks on a fossil hunt a few minutes ago, which I believe to be either nodules or concretions. What should I do to split these rocks? I know that I should probably not try to break them with a hammer and chisel, and instead use the freeze-thaw process. This is my first experience with nodules or concretions, so I am not very knowledgeable on this topic. Is there a specific recommended length of time I should leave them in the cold? How long should I thaw them for? How many times should I put them through the process before seeing cracks? How cold should the environment be for the freezing to work? If they are in fact nodules or concretions, I will post pictures of my finds (or lack thereof)!
  5. Agnostid?

    I found this fossil a few days ago at an exposure of the Billings Shale. It was found associated with Triarthrus glabellas and brachiopods. It's structure leads me to believe that it's either an Isotelus pygidium or an agnostid, although I do not know of any agnostics described in this formation and age.
  6. Anthology Of Unidentified Fossils

    Hi again! This will probably be my last ID post for a while. This time, I've decided to put all of the Unidentified fossils in one post. These are all from the Ordovician aged Billings Shale. Help identifying these will be much appreciated! 1. Leaf-shaped imprint. Mineral inclusion? 2. Trilobite fragment? 3. Dark markings and furrows. Burrows?
  7. Hello TTF! This post will contain the pictures of my science fair board, as well as the awards I received from it. Sorry for the delay, I know that some members posted requests for these months ago, but I have been busy with other things lately. I actually left part of the board at school by accident for weeks. I hope the pictures are clear enough!
  8. Repairing Fossils In Shale

    Recently, I have been out fossil hunting more often than usual, and many of them have since been damaged. Some were broken during transportation, and others were broken as I excavated them. The fossils are all from the black Billings Shale, which fractures easily. Is there any way that I can repair them without leaving any obvious markings?
  9. NALMA,SALMA,GABI

    FLYKOwswish this article has some bearing on the following issues: Mammal biochronology,the precise timing and/or speed of the G(reat)A(merican)B(iotic)I(nterchange),it contains some remarks on mammal taxa(however brief), magnetostratigraphic resolution from the Miocene to the Pleistocene, the closing of the Panama isthmus, and the possible diachroneity of mammal taxon appearances. There are NO taxa illustrated,and the authors' (infrequent)use of "heterochroneity " is unfortunate . If you have Woodburne(2012): this might be up your alley I liked it,but I'm weird that way
  10. Triarthrus?

    Hi TFF! I have just found a very interesting fossil near my home which I suspect might be the articulated left and right pleura of a Triarthrus. I have already found other fragments of Triarthrus in the same rock outcrop. (Glabellas, pleura, cephalons, etc.) It may also be a graptolite or something similar.
  11. Orthocone or Hyolithid?

    Another fossil for ID! This time, I think that I have some possible orthocone nautiloids from the Billings Shale. I found these near a small construction site near my house. Although I suspect them to be cephalopods, they may also be Hylothids. Or, they could be something else entirely! I am not an expert on these faunas at the moment, so I may be wrong. Each photo is of a different specimen. Thanks in advance! More posts about the regional science fair are to follow.
  12. Dear TFF members, As some of you may already know, I have been working on my science fair project concerning the Trilobite Pseudogygites latimarginatus for several months. This science fair project has been awarded a position in the Ottawa Regional Science Fair held at Carleton University this week. Your help has been instrumental in my success, and my appreciation cannot be expressed in words. As one way of thanking you all, I am inviting anyone on the forum who will be in or near Ottawa at the time to attend the fair. My project will be open to the public this Friday, April 6th, from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, and again this Saturday, April 7th, from 9:00 am - 11:30 am. It is titled, "The Impact of Environment on the Biodiversity of Pseudogygites latimarginatus." My project's number is 1101. I will also have some of my most prized fossils on display, as well as some edible specimens, for the Trilobite enthusiasts! I am not asking for anyone to go out of their way to see my project, this is just a simple invitation. Everyone is welcome.
  13. carboniferous Midcontinent

    Concise & clear.What more do you want? algeidcontin143.pdf About 1,5 Mb
  14. Hello again TTF! This will be my second post about my finds from my first trip to the peace river! This post is dedicated to one of my favourite finds and one of my favourite animals, the mammoth! During my trip to the peace river, I found many beautiful fossils myself, but I seemed to have had the best luck searching through other people's garbage. The location where I went to collect in was already visited many times by other people. Everything unwanted that turns up in their shifters is usually thrown to the banks, creating garbage piles. One particularly productive garbage pile produced many of my favourite Dugong ribs, my only meg (more on that later) and a mammoth tooth! How someone could look at these things and throw them away is beyond me. Unfortunately, the tooth was already fragmented when I found it. I believe that all the fragments came from the same tooth, though, because some fit together perfectly! I also have a question about this tooth. Is it possible to identify the species of mammoth from the tooth, either from its features or by looking at the known species of mammoth present in Florida? Thanks!
  15. King of the Dugong

    Happy March break TTF! I hope you all had a fantastic holiday! I have just gotten back from a fantastic trip to Florida. Thanks to TTF, I was lucky to discover the peace river. This discovery caused an entire re-write of my family's vacation plans. My father, who was also looking forward to walking through a swamp, agreed to join me on an expedition there. This was my first fossil hunting trip in Florida. I would also like to give my thanks and free advertising to Fossil Funatics, the tour operator who organized the hunt and provided the resources for us. We had a very successful two days. The guy is truly helpful, knowledgable, and fun to be around. He kindly gave all of his Dugong ribs and some of his shark teeth to me. We actually went to a stream which feeds into the actual peace river. As soon as we arrived there, I found myself overtaken by a sudden obsession with Dugong bones, earning my the titular nickname given to me by my dad. Since I have literally hundreds fossils from the river, this post will be dedicated to the Dugong bones. More posts on this are to follow! Enjoy!
  16. Pseudogygites pygidium

    From the album Billings Shale

    A partially pyritized P. latimarginatus pygidium from the Billings formation near St. Laurent, Ottawa.
  17. Diplocraterion?

    Hi again! I have another unidentified fossil from the Billings. It is a brown or dark yellow coloured streak. I think it must be some type of ichnofossil. To me, it reminds me of some fossils of Diplocraterion. It could also just be a streak made from another mineral, such as calcite. It is preserved alongside one almost full-length crinoid stem impression and one 3 dimensionally preserved specimen of the aforementioned animal.
  18. A Sound of Thunder?

    Ok, let me explain this title. I was out for my second hunt in the Billings Formation yesterday and found this fossil. There have been many fossils that I could'nt exactly identify, but usually I have some inclination or hypothesis about its identity. This is not the case here. I am at a total and complete loss as to what this thing could possibly be. It is circular and ribbed. The first thing I thought when I saw this was "human fingerprint". I have put my own finger in the picture for scale. Looks like somebody stepped off the path in the Ordovician!
  19. I'm running a paleontology camp this summer in Delaware. We can' actually do much digging because there are no fossils at the camp site. We do, however, have living fossils around that the kids can meet. I'd like to introduce the kids to the living fossils and show them the evidence of their ancient ancestors. We have snapping turtles (common and alligator), an alligator, horseshoe crabs, access to ginkgo leaves and magnolia, pileated woodpeckers aplenty, and triops kits are easy to come by online. Anybody have any fossils of these that they could part with? I have mostly marine fossils I can trade from all over the east coast, though mostly common stuff. From Delaware I have silicified pleistocene cyprus wood from Odessa, DE, belemnites, cretaceous gastropods, brachiopods (lamp shells), pelyceopods, and button corals from the C and D Canal (Mt Laurel Formation), plus various paleozoic tabulate and rugose corals that wash down the river from the Appalachians. I have oodles of shells, stingray plates, coprolites, and a piece of palmate coral from Calvert Cliffs (Miocene, Choptank formation). I have FLUORESCENT pleistocene shells from the Tamiami Formation in Florida. Plus, I have calamities and lycopods from the Lewellyn Formation in Carbondale, PA. The pictures here may not be the exact specimens and only represent a sample. If there is something specific from these locales that interests you, ask me. I might have something. Anyone willing to help me out? It doesn't have to be museum grade, so long as we can match it up to the modern version.
  20. A Spiral Of Confusion

    Another unidentified fossil from the Billings Shale Formation! This time, it's some kind of spiral shaped fossil. There are actually three in this one stone, and many more in other places, so they are fairly common. This fossil has a definite spiral shape, unlike the orthocone cross sections. Right now I think they are either some type of Gastropod, or a coiled ammonoid nautiloid cephalopod. Any ideas? I appreciate your help!
  21. Ice age fossils from Yukon help identify new horse genus Stilt-legged horses — extinct since the last ice age — are unrelated to modern horses, donkeys and zebras CBC News, November 28, 2017 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/yukon-horse-genus-dawson-fossils-1.4423896 The paper is: Heintzman, P.D., Zazula, G.D., MacPhee, R.D., Scott, E., Cahill, J.A., McHorse, B.K., Kapp, J.D., Stiller, M., Wooller, M.J., Orlando, L. and Southon, J.R., 2017. A new genus of horse from Pleistocene North America. bioRxiv, p.154963. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/06/24/154963 https://elifesciences.org/articles/29944 Yours, Paul H.
  22. Did Ice Age Cause Mastodon Extinction?

    Did Ice Age Cause Mastodon Extinction? New Research Suggest Several Causes Central Washington University, Oct. 29, 2017 http://www.cwu.edu/did-ice-age-cause-mastodon-extinction-new-research-suggest-several-causes Emery-Wetherell, Meaghan M., Brianna K. McHorse, and Edward Byrd Davis. "Spatially explicit analysis sheds new light on the Pleistocene megafaunal extinction in North America." Paleobiology (2017): 1-14. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/319333874_Spatially_explicit_analysis_sheds_new_light_on_the_Pleistocene_megafaunal_extinction_in_North_America https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/paleobiology/article/spatially-explicit-analysis-sheds-new-light-on-the-pleistocene-megafaunal-extinction-in-north-america/ https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/paleobiology/article/spatially-explicit-analysis-sheds-new-light-on-the-pleistocene-megafaunal-extinction-in-north-america/A3EBE9B5067CFFB821F4EDC81962421D Another paper is: Brault, M.O., Mysak, L.A., Matthews, H.D. and Simmons, C.T., 2013. Assessing the impact of late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions on global vegetation and climate. Climate of the Past, 9(4), p.1761. https://www.clim-past.net/9/1761/2013/cp-9-1761-2013.pdf https://search.proquest.com/docview/1430895281?pq-origsite=gscholar http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.799.8882&rep=rep1&type=pdf Yours, Paul H.
  23. My Display Overview

    Hello there paleontologists, fossil enthusiast, and everything in between. If you couldn't tell this is the first content I've ever made on the fossil forum so please excuse errors and, or inexperience I apologize in advance. Here is my collection of display fossils as well as modern bones keep in mind this is purely what I have on display I keep the vast majority of fossils I posses in storage with lots of support such as bubble rap and various other materials to ensure complete security of precious peeks into our planet's history. If you have any questions or comments feel free to ask as you please. These are all authentic fossils 2 have been directly seen by a professional (Ursus sp. & Unidentified Dinosaur Cretaceous Rib) The Dactylioceras sp. is very clearly a real specimen however there was no authority on it's authenticity the two Hadrosaur fragments are authentic as well one purchased with it's card of authenticity by D.J Parsons and the other was purchased from the very same hunter whom discovered the Cretaceous rib section. (Note: individual specimen content will be released in time)
  24. This was posted by Dr. Thomas Holtz on Twitter. Enjoy! So much diversity in the Campanian! http://www.facetsjournal.com/article/facets-2016-0074/#.WPj49B5K0Zw.twitter
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