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Found 56 results

  1. Hello group. I just wanted to share some photos of a Mastodon Americanus tooth I purchased and detailed. I've included the before and after photos. There are no enhancements to this fossil, just a lite coat of wax.
  2. cretaceous uncoiled ammonites

    The French magazine 'fossiles' recently published a very complete and richly illustrated article about uncoiled ammonites from the western inland sea (Upper Cretaceous –North America) Fossiles, n°39, juillet-août-septembre 2019 ; pages 5 to 42 (in french language…); -quarterly review by annual subscription- www.minerauxetfossiles.com revue fossiles002.pdf
  3. Hello again! I'm almost ready to label my Carboniferous fossils, and since I know pretty much nothing about plants fossils, I was hoping to get some help Specimen #1 from Pennsylvania, USA: Specimen #2 from Illinois, USA - each half of one nodule: Specimen #3 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #4 from New Brunswick, Canada: Specimen #5 from Poland: Specimen #6 from England: Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  4. My fossil hunting friend came across this object in a creek in eastern Missouri. At first glance this ~1 cm diameter ball with stout spikes would seem to be some sort of camerate crinoid, but the spikes cover the entire surface, with no apparent place to put arms, column, mouth, or anus. (Side note: That must be the crinoid folksong community's version of "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes.") From there my fallback would be coral, or perhaps sponge, but the complete coverage around the whole sphere (see attached video) has me a bit baffled. The creek flows through mostly Meramecian (Visean) Mississippian bedrock, in particular the Salem Limestone. There is abundant chert, with common silicified fossils, which is what I believe this to be, though I have not examined it myself. Perhaps this is the internal mold of something? The chert bits I have seen from this creek, and from this region in general, are by and large not internal molds, but rather proper replacement fossils. I guess this oddity just has me reaching. Any thoughts with regard to identification would be most appreciated. video-1562025086_u3dNmuqY_sDVP.mp4
  5. I have a few questions about trilobites. 1) Does anyone know the size of the largest trilobite ever found? 2) What is the average size of a trilobite in North America, specifically New York state? 3) What is the average size of a trilobite found in Morocco? 4) Why does it seem like trilobites are mostly found in New York state and Morocco? Do maps of what the Earth might of looked like during the Devonian period? I had a bit of a disappointing first hunting trip for these little creatures in Tully, NY yesterday and any answers that will help me better understand them will be appreciated greatly.
  6. It seems to me that our feral horses should be considered "Native Wildlife" like any other. Why did horses in North America go extinct?
  7. Identification and age of Tooth #2

    This tooth was found on a beach off the channel at South Padre Island. I am a shell and artifact hunter and have been finding fossils of late. I don't really know about fossils and have joined this group to help me learn and identify what I find. I have three fossils that I would love help with identification and I will post separately. Thanks so much!
  8. Identification and age of Tooth

    This tooth was found on a beach off the channel at South Padre Island. I am a shell and artifact hunter and have been finding fossils of late. I don't really know about fossils and have joined this group to help me learn and identify what I find. I have three fossils that I would love help with identification and I will post separately. Thanks so much!
  9. Perri, A., Widga, C., Lawler, D., Martin, T., Loebel, T., Farnsworth, K., Kohn, L. and Buenger, B., 2018. New Evidence of the Earliest Domestic Dogs in the Americas. bioRxiv, p.343574. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/06/27/343574 https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2018/06/11/343574.full.pdf https://www.academia.edu/38045438/_American_Antiquity_2019_New_Evidence_of_the_Earliest_Dogs_in_the_Americas Leathlobhair, M.N., Perri, A.R., Irving-Pease, E.K., Witt, K.E., Linderholm, A., Haile, J., Lebrasseur, O., Ameen, C., Blick, J., Boyko, A.R. and Brace, S., 2018. The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas. Science, 361(6397), pp.81-85. http://www.palaeobarn.com/sites/default/files/publications/NorthAmerica_CTVT_revised_3.pdf http://dro.dur.ac.uk/25675/2/25675S.pdf http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6397/81 A similar article about cats. Where Do Cats Come From? By Claudio Ottoni Friends of Asor. January 2019, vol. VII, no. 1. http://www.asor.org/anetoday/2019/01/Where-Do-Cats-Come-From An older Fossil forum post about dogs. A new evidence that humans have already cared for dogs 14,000 years ago By Kasia, February 20, 2018 in Fossil News http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/82140-a-new-evidence-that-humans-have-already-cared-for-dogs-14000-years-ago/&tab=comments#comment-870629 Yours, Paul H. "The past is never dead. It's not even past." William Faulkner, Act 1, Scene III, Requiem for a Nun (1951)
  10. Campanian gastropods

    LINKdocker David T. Dockery III THE STREPTONEURAN GASTROPODS,EXCLUSIVE OF THE STENOGLOSSA, OF THE COFFEE SAND (CAMPANIAN) OF NORTHEASTERN MISSISSIPPI BULLETIN 129 MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OFFICE OF GEOLOGY size:approx. 27 MB NB: dedicated to Norman F.Sohl(and containing biographical details)
  11. Montana, a shortish faunal review

    EASTON W.H.Easton: Carboniferous Faunas and Formation of Central Montana A study of the stratigraphic and ecologic associations and significance of fossils from the Big Snowy group of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks Geological suvey Proferssional paper n.348/1962 Number of pages 157 PLATE two: stratidistribplate-2.pdf PLATE ONE(correlation/logs) plate-1.pdf to be used with some care with regard to (at least)the taxonomic aspects
  12. Teilhardina revised

    A new paper regarding primitive fossil primates is available if you're interested: Paul E. Morse; Stephen G.B. Chester; Doug M. Boyer; Thierry Smith; Richard Smith; Paul Gigase; Jonathan I. Bloch (2018). New fossils, systematics, and biogeography of the oldest known crown primate Teilhardina from the earliest Eocene of Asia, Europe, and North America. Journal of Human Evolution. in press. doi:10.1016/j.jhevol.2018.08.005. Ni et al. (2004) were the first primate workers to propose that Teilhardina is polyphyletic, but Morse et al. (2018) formalize this scheme by erecting Bownomomys for two nominal Teilhardina species from North America. I just wanted to ask for a copy of this paper because it is not accessible at the Journal of Human Evolution website.
  13. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni.
  14. Triarthrus eatoni

    Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni. Found in association with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, and Graptolites. The Cephalon is slightly disarticulated, likely from molting.
  15. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside three other T. eatoni and one T. rougensis. Both eyes are preserved.
  16. Triarthrus rougensis

    Both genal spines are present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized. Found associated with T. spinosus, T. eatoni, cephalopods, and graptolites.
  17. Triarthrus spinosus

    Ventrally preserved. Both genal spines and one thoracic spine are present. Hyostome slightly visible. Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods and graptolites.
  18. Triarthrus spinosus

    Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods, and graptolites. Impression of right genal spine is present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized.
  19. Unknown Skull ID help

    Hello everyone, new member here! We recently started boxing up my childhood home to ready it for a sale and I discovered a long forgotten box that had a few fossils that my grandmother obtained during her ongoing 91 years on this earth. Almost all I believe were obtained by digs she went on around North America and chances are she obtained this one in the midwest. Most had tags like fish, mammoth tusk shard, and part of a deer jaw. I couldn't find an ID for this one, and upon asking my grandmother she hasn't the faintest idea because it's been decades and her mental state is slipping. If you need any more pictures of any sides let me know, my hand is only there to hold the two halves together, because unfortunately it hasn't survived in one whole piece. It measures about 160 mm. Another clue, but she did majority of her digs in Nebraska I believe. I'll have to Split up my posts with the pictures, I apologize.
  20. Stack&Sallan 35 Mb An examination of the Devonian fishes of Michigan Jack Stack and Lauren Sallan How to cite this article: Stack and Sallan (2018), An examination of the Devonian fishes of Michigan. PeerJ 6:e5636; DOI 10.7717/peerj.5636 contains: -Rockport Quarry species list -a nice bit on Protitanichthys NB :the remains are mostly disarticulated
  21. Brachiopods and Bivalves

    Hi all As I age, I am working on talks and the co-responding displays to donate my collections to be used while I can for talks to curious people who come to the natural history society where I volunteer. After i'm gone, having written out the talk and picture power point and with the actual fossils, these talks could go on. Also hopefully made available to teachers. Anyway, I am struggling with finding an intriguing story lines for a talk on Brachiopods and Bivalves. For example in my cephalopod talk, the story line is how they overcame the problem of buoyancy. So i am asking for your thoughts for something similar on this topic. Also ask for your recommendations for specimens to include. I'm looking for ones that grab people's attention for beauty, ugliness etc. I have id'ed: spirifers (pyritized), lamp shells, Ruck's pit Mercenaria, Cucullaea (Giant clam), Panopea, Cretaceous oyster Exogyra, Inoceramus, Spondylus, Arca hinge teeth and markings. There are some weirdly beautiful rudists from Texas (would anyone be willing to donate to the cause?) Hopefully this gives you some idea what I am trying to do-specimens that each have their own special story to catch people curiosity and interest to promote their interest in learning. And if possible, an overarching story line that unites brachiopods or unites bivalves. Appreciate everyone's thought and comments. Thanks
  22. A Fossilized Thing

    Hi again! I’m totally stumped with this one. The rock is limestone, so its not the Billings formation. There is still some matrix on it, but most of the surface is exposed. It’s spherical and slightly faceted. Fossil pearl?
  23. Triarthrus finds

    Hello again! This post will be about some beautifully preserved Triarthrus fossils (and my first complete Trilobite finds). Some of them even have the eyes preserved! I found these at a local train station, and the site of significant construction lately. I believe most of the to be E. eotoni, and the last one to be E. rougensis or spinosus. It may not be visible in the picture, but the last one has a streak of pyrite along the side of its cephalon / upper thorax. Could this be some kind of soft body tissue preservation, similar to those of the Beecher's Trilobite bed?
  24. Fossil ID

    This may or may not actually be a fossil. It is a cylindrical, shimmering white streak on the Shale. It is only about an inch long. This may just be another mineral inclusion, or some discoloured sediment. Any help with identifying this would be appreciated!
  25. Ordovician Road Cut

    Yesterday, I was lucky enough to attend a very special field trip with the Eastern Ontario Natural History Society to a massive road cut in Ontario. The rock exposed was Ordovician aged limestone, and it produced some amazing fossils. I might need some id help with some of these. The giant cephalopod was by far the best thing I found! 1. Giant Cephalopod (with hand for scale) Camerocerad or Endoceras? 2. Crinoid stems, bryozoans and Gastropod 3. Partial trilobite pygidia
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