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Found 507 results

  1. Carolina Coast Vertebra

    Hey there! New user, and probably not likely to stick around for long if I'm honest. I've just never had much of an affinity for forums, I'm afraid. That said, I have been absorbed by this particular specimen for several decades. The only suggestion I've heard so far is some kind of whale, but I was curious if I could narrow it down a bit more. Also, I'm not an expert, but it seems pretty different from most whale vertebrae I've looked up. That said, there are a lot of bones in a lot of kinds of whales out there, so I could easily, easily be wrong in my skepticism. This was found on a beach in southeastern North Carolina, it is approximately 7 cm long, nearly 11 cm across, and almost 9 cm in height, for reference, in case the ruler is tough to read. View from behind: View from above: View from the front (and upside down): View from the side: I appreciate any help or information anyone can offer, and if nothing else, I hope you guys get some enjoyment from the puzzle! Let me know if I did anything wrong or if you need more info and I'll see what I can scrounge up to help you out. Cheers!
  2. Need Help to Identify

    Hello. I came across this fossil recently while at GMR in Greenville, North Carolina. I was hoping someone would be able to tell me what it came from & what part. My friend I went with thought it was some sort of jawbone piece. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
  3. Fossil Long Bone? Please ID.

    Hello, My daughter found this in our creek today after a bad rain storm. We think it is a fossil of a long bone. It seems to have a layer of perioteum on the outside with vertical striations, and horizontal striations underneath (Sharpy's fibers?). It is heavy and dense. Can you please help me confirm that this is a bone? And if so, can it be identified more specifically? Thank you so much!!
  4. Waccamaw Bryozoan

    A few months back I won an auction from @sixgill pete and part of the lot was a bag of matrix from the Waccamaw Formation in Columbus County North Carolina. The Waccamaw Fm. is a marine sand and shell hash that has been correlated numerous different ways with a varying range of ages applied to it in the past, but as it is currently interpreted, it is Pleistocene in age (Gelasian and Calabrian Stages or Upper Blancan to Irvingtonian if you prefer the NA names) and found in South Carolina and southeastern North Carolina. The bag was chock full of molluscan goodies and I am steadily working through the identification of those. One thing that caught my eye amongst all the shells were these little saucer shaped bryozoans similar to Lunulites except that most had a little grain of sand at their center. They are small (generally 2-3 mm in diameter, largest one is 7 mm across), but there were several hundred of them. After staring at them under the microscope for long enough, I recognized that there were at least two different types in here. Here is a shot of my sorting tray with all of them in there. A quick check of the two great publications I have from the North Carolina Fossil Club gave me some excellent pictures but three different names. A check of WORMS showed me that only one of those names was currently accepted so I began my search to see what was what knowing full well that bryozoan identification can be difficult and involves a lot of terminology that I am not well versed in (I have to admit, when ID’ing my collections, I am prone to lump the Paleozoic bryozoans from a given locality in one container and just be satisfied with that). A search of threads on the Fossil Forum led me to a couple where they were mentioned, but no defining pictures or ID’s. Here are a few pictures of what we are dealing with and I will apologize right from the start for the poor quality pictures. I really have to get a better setup for taking microfossil pictures since I tend to deal with small stuff a lot. I have decent microscope where I can look at them, but it is not set up for pictures. These are the two more easily identifiable forms, the picture on the right shows two of the same species but in one you can see the sand grain that is the starting point for the bryozoan, it sometimes gets covered or lost in growth and/or fossilization. So, after gathering and reading through a bunch of references from the early 1900’s onward I think I have the correct ID and most current name, but am open to any suggestions from those familiar with these little creatures. At the very least, hopefully this can serve as a helpful guide to someone who may have come across these, but struggled to put a name to them. There is a great publication by Canu and Bassler (1923) called North American Later Tertiary and Quaternary Bryozoa which provides lots of information, plenty of descriptions and enough illustrations to find both of the forms I had recognized. Specifically, they identified a species called Cupularia denticulata from the Waccamaw Fm and its description matched the form on the right above (just to make things interesting, there was another genus of similar bryozoa called Cupuladria, yes, just one letter different – ugh!). From this publication I had a potential name for the two types, could see where the names in the NCFC publications were coming from, and just had to track down what had changed in the intervening almost 100 years.
  5. Dinosaur teeth from North Carolina are very rare to come by. There are only a small handful of sites where they have come from. One of the sites is well known, but the others are a closely guarded secret. Those of you who have been lucky to find such things, let's see your pictures. Not mosasaurs, not plesiosaurs but land dwelling dinosaurs. Here are mine. First a Tyrannosauroidea indet. There are two known Tyrannosaurids from N.C. Dryptosaurus and Appalachasaurus.The small size of this tooth will most likely keep it from being able to be ID'd to Genus level. It is 9.8 mm long, 6.4 mm wide and 3.5 mm thick. The next tooth is Hadrosauridae indet. It is 17.7 mm long, 8.7 mm wide and 6.7 mm thick. The third and final tooth has been determined to be an indeterminate Dromaeosaurid. It is 7.1 mm long, 2.8 mm wide and 1.6 mm thick.
  6. Hi everyone! Little over a week ago I recieved some new bags of microfossil matrix and this time there was a bag with material from the Lee Creek Mine, Yorktown Formation, Aurora, North Carolina, USA (Miocene, 14,5 mya) This material is quite rich in shark teeth as I found little over 90 shark teeth in it. I have photographed a couple of them already and posted them in my microfossil topic. But since I doubt I will get many help with the identification of the teeth there I am going to repost the first batch of teeth here (I apologize for the repost admins) and upload the rest of my finds from that material in this topic from now on. I have tried to ID some of the teeth with the help of the website Elasmo & the paper "Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III by Clayton E. Ray and David J. Bohaska", but I feel like my eyes aren't enough trained yet to distinguish enough to make proper ID's on all of the finds, so I not all ID's will be a 100 % correct I am affraid. Here are some of the first teeth I photographed. I would be gratefull if some of you could help my ID some of the teeth of verify /correct some of the ID's I have come up with. If the photo's aren't clear of good enough, just let me know and I'll try to make some more/better ones. Thank you in advance! The first tooth which is by far also the favorite in the bunch: Tooth 1: a Sphyrna zygaena tooth? Tooth 2: a chunk of Galeocerdo sp. tooth Tooth 3: another Galeocerdo sp. tooth Tooth 4: This one is a tooth which I have a hard time identifying as I feel it has a lot of features that return in different teeth. Physogaleus? Sphyrna? Loxodon? Tooth 5: another I haven't managed to ID yet. Tooth 6: Carcharhinus sp. Tooth 7: could this be Negaprion sp.? Tooth 8: Tooth 9: Scyliorhinus sp.? Tooth 10: Megachasma sp.? Tooth 11: Megachasma sp.?
  7. Shark tooth? North Carolina

    I found this tooth (same tooth, two sides) in some phosphate mine slag from the Aurora Fossil Museum. Can you tell what species this is? I don't see anything quite like it on the charts I've consulted. The other pic is from the same slag and is some kind of ray, I believe.
  8. Trip from corolla beach, NC

    Ok so to start off with this, I’m going to post my finds from a recent trip to the outer banks of North Carolina. I was very disappointed to be going to this location at first, because I had no idea of its fossil significance. I wanted to go further down south where the sharks teeth get huge, but the cases further down for Covid 19 were very high and I didn’t want to risk catching the virus so the whole group (who were all my neighbors) decided to head here instead. The first day on the beach, I found a lot of fish fossils (including those vertebrae’s) but it was the second day that was the best. I came across a canine jaw! With the teeth still inside it. It was just sitting in the gravel where I searched for shark teeth and I was so happy of my find because I knew it was something good. As the days went on, I kept finding more evidence of land mammal fossils here, including an astragalus, a scute for a mammal of some sort, crab fragments, fish bone, and a lot more! I have to say, in my years of collecting North Carolina I’ve never come across such an abundance of land mammal fossils in one week. The one question I have, however, is if there is any way you guys could help me identify the species of the jaw? I tried to look for fossil formations off shore but I can’t find any links leading to what this came from. I tried looking at land mammal fauna’s of N.C. but it pulled up nothing. Is there any way to get a specific ID on this jaw?
  9. Rock Hunting Franklin NC

    Hey Fam! Going to be in Franklin, NC for a few days in October. I’m fixin to do as much rockhounding as possible which I believe goes without saying. I’m looking for resources in the form of Areas where I can sift, walk river banks and what mines (I probably only want to spend money on one) are worth the time devotion to. My parent’s place is on a mountain which is full of creeks. Am I bound to find some neat stuff just hopping from one to another? What can I expect? Any information is greatly appreciated!!! Edit: I grabbed a UV light off Amazon because I’m told Rubies and Garnets Fluoresce at night.
  10. Arc Shell

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Tiny Dallarca elnia next to the head of a sewing pin from the Pliocene/Pleistocene micro matrix of the Nutrien Aurora/Lee Creek Phosphate Mine in Auora, North Carolina These got much, MUCH bigger!
  11. Arene tricarinata

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Tiny marine gastropod from the Pliocene/Pleistocene micro matrix of the Nutrien Aurora/Lee Creek Phosphate Mine in Auora, North Carolina
  12. Pliocene/Pleistocene Gastropod

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Ringicula semistriata Nutiren Aurora/Lee Creek Phosphte Mine Aurora, North Carolina
  13. Bryozoan

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Discoporella ? Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina Thanks to @Al Dente for the ID
  14. So Many Minis!

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    This assemblage came from one cup (about 340 ml) of micro matrix from Aurora Fossil Museum. Oddly, they are generally much larger than most of what I found in the rest of the matrix. They are all from either the Pliocene or Pleistocene. See album description.
  15. Shark Teeth Sizes

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    The large and the small of it: two shark teeth from Aurora's "Emergency Kit" next to a sewing pin. Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina
  16. Porgy Fish Tooth

    From the album Aurora/Lee Creek Mine Micro Matrix

    Family Sparidae Pliocene/Pleistocene from Aurora Fossil Museum micro matrix Aurora, North Carolina
  17. Aurora, NC - Squalodon?

    I have a dozen teeth from Aurora, North Carolina that I believe to be from the toothed whale Squalodon. Instead of uploading photos of that many, I'm uploading a few that are representative of the dozen and detailed photographs of three of these. For context, the first tooth here is 2.5" long and 1" wide at its thickest.
  18. Lee Creek Dolphin Tooth?

    I have here a tooth from Lee Creek, Aurora, North Carolina. I believe it to be Kentriodon. It's a hair above 1". Does this seem accurate? If so, could it potentially be narrowed down further yet? Thank you, Bellamy
  19. Greens Mill Run, 9-27

    Had a pretty productive afternoon on Sunday. No large teeth but tons of small ones and lots of bone. One partial shark vert! Some...seeds? That I'm not sure on. Along with one other thing that I'm not sure on.
  20. Maybe shark teeth? ID help needed

    New to the forum and having fun searching for fossil teeth at beaches. Went to Topsail beach, NC a week ago and found these (pics attached). They look like teeth but do not resemble any that I've seen in pdfs or pictures of fossils expected in NC. They vary in size and directional angle. The "top" of the teeth have mostly a rounded surface and the "underside" have angular cavities. I'd appreciate any thoughts on what they are. Even if they are nothing special, I had fun doing the search and will continue to do so!
  21. Recent GMR Find

    Found this on my most recent trip to GMR.
  22. Green Mill Run

    Hi all. I found this in green mill run in Greenville NC. I don't know what it is but since it has the same enamel look of a tooth I kept it. I hope there is enough of it there for someone to have an idea of what it is! In inches it is about 1.25 and centimeters 3.175. Thank you very much!!
  23. What kind of tooth is this?

    Found this at low tide at North Topsail Beach, NC, USA and am wondering the source. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  24. Is this a fossil? Corolla NC Beach Find

    Hello! I found this on the beach in Corolla North Carolina. The color and texture look a lot like fossilized sharks teeth I’ve found in the past, so I’m hoping it’s some sort of fossil and not just a bit of shell. It’s a little under 1/2inch long. I hope these pictures are clear enough, thank you for looking!
  25. I found this claw while sifting gravels looking for shark teeth in a small creek. Does anybody have any ideas on what this might be? It was found in North Carolina.
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