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Found 192 results

  1. Found a nice little spot nearby, I only spent a couple hours and if it's not too hot I'll be heading back tomorrow!
  2. I found this on a construction site in southeastern Summit County, Ohio. Is it a rock or a fossil?
  3. Paulding (OH) Fossil Gardens

    Thanks to @Fossil-Hound, who recently submitted a trip report to Paulding, Ohio, I was reminded that I had not been there yet and decided to head down there today. As mentioned by Fossil-Hound, this is "spoil" from the LaFarge Quarry which operates just down the road from the site. The quarry has generously set aside some land where they have placed numerous long piles of fossil-rich shale from the Silica Formation (middle Devonian: Givetian). The fossil park is fenced-in, and there is a nice, spatious, gravel parking lot as well as a porta-pot. There is a liability waiver form, but when I was there, there were no more blank ones -- just a whole bunch that had already been filled out and stuffed in the receptacle on the sign. I read everything and looked everywhere regarding rules for using "tools". I saw no rules against using a rock hammer or other tools. Here are a few pictures of the site and parking area (the "smoke" in the background is from the quarry. THey actually blasted once when I was there!):
  4. Clam shell possibly.... only found half

    Am I correct in thinking this was once a clam? And a fossil now? Thanks for your help!
  5. Could be a clam?

    Wondering if this could be a fossil of some sort? Resembles a clam with curvy lines and folds. Any ideas or thoughts? Thanks!
  6. Well I'm on my way to Utah for a new career opportunity and looked up the LaFarge quarry in Paulding Co. last night. This quarry is supplied with dump trucks worth of shale from the LaFarge quarry that pulls directly from the Silica Shale formation Devonian era. The location is in the middle of nowhere and my wife gave me one hour to look around. Soon I had my five month old daughter, Clara, strapped to my chest in a baby carrier and I was quickly scrounging around looking for fossils. I can tell you that I was not disappointed though I did not locate a complete Eldredgeops roller I did walk away with some very large brachiopods and the largest horned coral I've ever collected. To anyone seeking to collect fossils in the mid-west or Ohio, this location is a must. All this came out in under an hour of searching and some of these pieces could look good after some light preparation. See descriptions below: This place is in the middle-of-nowhere Ohio. The parking lot was gravel with a portable outhouse. The nearest gas station was about twenty minutes away. I was talking to @Kane about conglomerates of fossil bits and he noted similar compositions at both Penn Dixie and Arkona. I know there's a scientific term for what this occurrence is but I can't seem to recall the word at this time. Regardless I find these settings interesting as they don't seem to preserve anything exceptional, certainly not a complete trilobite but it's neat to see so much life in one piece of sedimentary rock. This particular rock is full of pieces of bryozoans, crinoids, trilobites, and brachiopods. Someday I'll invest in an expensive microscope to examine these different pieces. I usually don't keep horned coral but I couldn't resist keeping this one. The interior calcium based structures have crystalized and it is by far the largest horned coral I've ever picked up or seen in person though they can get bigger. There were Eldredgeop cephalons and pygidiums everywhere. Similar to Penn Dixie this is a really good sign that potential complete pieces, particularly rollers are present. I believe the terms of the site are that tools such as hammers and chisels are not allowed as the shale pieces are small and brittle enough to break in hand. I believe that a few years ago access to the official LaFarge quarry was granted but that was recently retracted and a number of amateur paleontologists wrote letters to the company requesting something be done to continue to provide access to the site. I'm really glad LaFarge goes out of their way to dump some scraps for people to pick through. Site admission is free and you can keep whatever you find. Large piece of an Eldredgeops segment sticking out of the matrix surrounded by brachiopod pieces. What a scene this must have been during the Devonian. The camera doesn't do this pyritized piece of shale justice. Hopefully I'll be able to take some micro pictures later of the square crystals. One of the larger Eldredgeops pygidiums I've ever seen and I read some sources last night that the trilobites in the Silica Shale can be very large. Almost every trilobite piece I came across at the site was very large. This pygidium is almost an inch wide. There were many spiriferid strewn throughout the site. Most had both halves and exhibited excellent color. Large cephalon. More pyrite. The large horn coral. More pyrite amidst a conglomerate of fossil pieces. A complete brachiopod out of the matrix. Front view of the brachiopod. I'll have to ID this one after some cleanup and polish. I really like the color on the corals and fossils at the site. This is a light tan. Another large complete brachiopod. A long spiriferid with what appears to be both halves. This one should prep out nicely. The desert of farms and trees of western Ohio. Corn, trees, and farms all around. Another good sized Eldredgeops cephalon. Yet another horn. Large Eldredgeops cephalon poking out. Not complete but gives me hope that there might be some complete specimens at the site.
  7. Ohio sites?

    I was debating posting this under the Ohio fossil discussion but am passing through Ohio on my way out to Utah and wanted to know if anyone knows of any good spots to go to. I hear that there's a fossil park in Paulding with the famous Silica Shale trilobite layers. I have all the tools in the car and my wife said I could go out for about two hours tomorrow though it might be one with a cat and newborn.
  8. Just a rock or more??

    Wondering what your thoughts are about the holes and marks/ fossils maybe in this rock. Is there a fossil present? Thanks for your help!
  9. This rock amazes me with all the different fossils I see present on it. Could someone share what they are? Thank you!
  10. Take a look... erosion or something else?

    I found this in a field. Assuming it was made by erosion possibly but thought I'd ask. Thanks for all help! Here's another.... thanks again.
  11. I've found a few fossils , or finds that I believe may be fossils. Am excited to find out your opinions about each of them. Thanks for all help!
  12. Would these be considered fossils?

    I collected these because I noticed a shiny silver color was inside them (once broken). But I'm not sure what it is or how to get it out without destroying the pieces. Also found this other rock that has " something" all over it. Any ideas? Thanks for all help!
  13. Please help identify. Hoofprints?

    Please help identify this fossil. There are 2 what appear to be hoof prints along with some shells. They were found in a river bed near Akron, Ohio. I'm sorry for the vagueness, but I am new to the fossil world.
  14. What is this little guy?

    Hi All! I'm new here, I found this blog while researching a little find of mine. I posted the pictures below. I found this cute little guy while beach glass picking at walnut beach on Lake Erie. As soon as I saw it I was pretty sure it was a fossil but I have no idea what. Thats why I'm here! I want to know what it is that I found. I appreciate any help from you guys! Thanks!!!
  15. Found this fossil at a fossil quarry in ohio, maybe you guys can help identify these fossils.
  16. Medina Ohio Creek

    Hello. My name is Michele. My father in law gave me a chunk of rock from a creek in Medina Ohio that has some plant fossilized in it. I was wondering if it could be identified and roughly how old it may be? I tried to put an image in but had some issues so here is a link to my Facebook image of it: https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10154324036140248&id=586335247&set=a.499883895247.271699.586335247&source=48
  17. Help with ID

    Found this in a creek bed in Hamilton Co. Ohio, Ordovician rocks primarily. I thought it was an animal bone or what, I don't know. After cleaniing it and putting it under some magnification it appears to be either a plant stem thing or some crinoid type animal. What think?
  18. Conulariids

    (Paraconularia chagrinensis) some devonian conulariids preserved in phosphorous concreations from the chagrin shale formation. Leroy, Oh
  19. Rhabdoderma elegans NEWBERRY, 1856

    Lit.: Hook, Robert W. and Baird, Donald (1988): An Overview of the Upper Carboniferous Fossil Deposit at Linton, Ohio. The Ohio Journal of Science. v88, n1 (March, 1988), 55-60. R.W. Hook and J. C. Ferm (1985) A depositional model for the Linton tetrapod assemblage (Westphalian D, Upper Carboniferous) and its paleoenvironmental significance. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 311, 101-109 (1985) Robert W. Hook and Donald Baird (1986) The Diamond Coal Mine of Linton, Ohio, and its Pennsylvanian-age vertebrates. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 6, 1986, pp. 174-190
  20. Tetrapod Trackway

    Nothing to add.
  21. Found this today. Is it the top of a Lepidodendron?
  22. A winter hunt

    In Late December, Minnesota is a land impossible to hunt fossils in. So when I took a trip to Ohio this Christmas, I was hoping mother nature would be kind to me and allow me to peak under a few rocks. While visiting my sister in NW Ohio, I convinced her to run up to Paulding with me to check out the Lafarge Quarry. Have seen postings about trilobites from there. We left Lima with no signs of snow on the ground. Two miles from our destination, the ground turned white, and snow was about 4 inches deep. Now I remember why I hated lake effect snow growing up in Ohio!! As long as we drove this far, we decided to travel on just to see the place. Fortunately, there had been a brisk wind that night and the tops of the rock piles were blown fairly clean of snow. Good enough for me. My sister thought I was nuts and remained in the vehicle. Here are the results of my short venture. Would love to visit this place in better conditions. I know how darctooth felt when he posted about his winter, snow covered excursion last week.
  23. Lit.: Hook, Robert W. and Baird, Donald (1988): An Overview of the Upper Carboniferous Fossil Deposit at Linton, Ohio. The Ohio Journal of Science. v88, n1 (March, 1988), 55-60. R.W. Hook and J. C. Ferm (1985) A depositional model for the Linton tetrapod assemblage (Westphalian D, Upper Carboniferous) and its paleoenvironmental significance. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 311, 101-109 (1985) Robert W. Hook and Donald Baird (1986) The Diamond Coal Mine of Linton, Ohio, and its Pennsylvanian-age vertebrates. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Vol. 6, 1986, pp. 174-190 Westoll, T. Stanley (1944): The Haplolepidae, a new family of late Carboniferous bony fishes : a study in taxonomy and evolution. Bulletin of the AMNH ; v. 83, article 1 dshamilla: Identifying Linton Paleoniscoid Fish
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