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Found 329 results

  1. Hello there! I took advantage of the nice weather we've been having to visit Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) yesterday afternoon. Here are some photos of specimens that I'd like help identifying - perhaps @Tidgy's Dad would like to have a look? Firstly - the whole rock which contains the bryozoans and the unknown black objects: Specimen #1: a nice branching bryozoan - perhaps Homotrypa? Specimen #2: a nice encrusting bryozoan (there are actually two of them) - perhaps Mesotrypa? More to come...
  2. ID - Hollow coral with gills?

    Everyone, Can someone identify this coral-type fossil? It's completely empty inside like a clam and has gills like a mushroom. I've looked through lots of photos in the Forum gallery to no avail. Nothing is even close. The 'top' isn't flat; it's a dome like the tip of your thumb, with holes on the tip. In the 'mudstone' matrix there's also a typical rugose coral. This was a loose rock in the area of the Kenogami Formation of limestone in Northern Ontario. Puzzled, Lauren16
  3. Hello everyone! I wanted to share some good news with you all... On Monday, March 16, 2020, I visited "Formosa Reef" in Ontario (Amherstburg Formation, Lower Devonian) for a little fossil hunt. One of the rocks that I found at the site had a trilobite piece that @piranha identified as the hypostome belonging to the trilobite Acanthopyge contusa. When I asked him if he knew of any museum/researcher who might be interested in my specimen, he suggested that I contact the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), and so I did. First, I emailed David Rudkin, and this is what he said: "Thank you very much for getting in touch and offering to donate your splendid little Acanthopyge hypostome! I've been retired from the ROM for 3 years now and am not permitted to act on behalf of the Invertebrate Palaeontology section, but I am copying these messages to the Curator and Collection Manager with my recommendation to accept your generous offer." "Acanthopyge contusa is indeed a relatively rare component of the Formosa trilobite fauna and the ROM collections do not hold any specimens of the elusive hypostome. Like your contact on The Fossil Forum I've not seen one from Ontario before, so your discovery is quite exciting ... at least for a self-professed trilobite geek such as myself! I'm hoping that my ROM colleagues, Dr Caron and Ms Akrami, will follow my recommendation to accept your offer, but I must leave the final decision in their hands." Just last night, I received two consecutive emails from Maryam Akrami (the current Invertebrate Paleontology Collections Manager at the ROM): "Thank you for sending the images and the information for the trilobite specimen. I am glad to let you know that we will accept your offer of donation. Just want to let you know that the ROM is closed until at least 5th April. If you would like to ship the specimen to us now, I can give you my home address. Once we have the specimen, I will send you a letter acknowledging your generous donation to the ROM." "Following up on my previous email (below), given the current situation and the advise against leaving our homes for non-essential reasons, perhaps it would be a good idea to wait till things return to normal and then ship the specimen to us. I hope that would be ok with yourself." So, once the ROM is up and running again, I'll be handing over my little Acanthopyge contusa hypostome to the ROM! I'll update this thread as soon as the donation has been completed. Here are pictures of the specimen in question: Thanks for reading, everyone! Monica
  4. Whitby, ON Trilobites

    Took this opportunity to head to the shores of Lake Ontario in Whitby and find some trilobites, among other stuff! Edit: Kane corrected this - they're nautiloids. Cheers!
  5. scolecodont or conodont?

    Hi again! Over the weekend, I posted pictures of small fossils in a rock I found at Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). I've created this new post just for the shiny black specimens that I found in the rock because a consensus wasn't reached regarding their identity. Each of the two specimens pictured below are 5mm long. My question is: are these items scolecodonts or conodonts? I was leaning towards scolecodonts but I wanted to see what others have to say... Thanks once again! Monica
  6. Hi all! I ventured out to Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario today to look for fossils. It was very cold and the rocks were frozen together, but I managed to pry out one large rock that has some interesting fossils on it. The fossils are from the Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Ordovician). The rock caught my eye because I could spot a few Cornulites flexuosus on one side, but after I brought it home and washed it, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the other side had even more interesting items on it! I'm not exactly sure of what I'm looking at, though, so I'm asking for your help. I'll tag @FossilDAWG since he's quite knowledgeable about fossils in my area Firstly, here's the whole rock so you can get an idea of the size of the fossils within the rock (i.e. they're generally quite small): Now on to the fossils! Here are some shiny black items that I've never seen before, but they look like scolecodont Oenonites sp. - what do you think? (I only circled the items that look sharp enough to be identified - the other black items I'm very not sure about!) Here are a couple of long, thin, and delicate-looking crinoid stems - can they be identified at all? Perhaps something like Ectenocrinus simplex (which does occur in the Georgian Bay Formation)? (The second one is located between the branching bryozoans which I think may be the bryozoan Homotrypa sp.) More to come...
  7. Fossil from the Onondaga Formation

    Is this a fossil or geologic?
  8. Visit to Formosa Reef!

    Hi all! After reading about @Kane's autumn trip to Ontario's Formosa Reef (Amherstburg Formation, Lower Devonian), I was inspired to find it and check it out myself. With the help of Ludvigsen's 1986 paper entitled "Reef trilobites from the Formosa Limestone (Lower Devonian) of southern Ontario," along with Google Maps' Satellite View, I was able to locate the reef, so Viola and I made the 2-hour drive yesterday to search the site for some new fossils. Here's Viola standing atop the reef: This was my first find of the day - a rock with a brachiopod AND a gastropod in it - woohoo!!! This was one of Viola's first finds of the day and probably her favourite - a large and beautiful chunk of tabulate coral: Here is a photo of Viola and I just before we left the site after about 3 hours of fossil-hunting: Photos of the fossils to come...
  9. EDIT: Current 2020 Running Tally of Ontario Bugs Acanthopyge contusa Anchiopsis anchiops Coronura sp. (?aspectans) Crassiproetus crassimarginatus Echinolichas sp. cf. eriopis Echinolichas sp. cf. hispidus Mystrocephala stummi Odontocephalus sp. Pseudodechenella sp. Trypaulites erinus I'll be parking all my trilobite hunts for the year in this thread. With winter ending much sooner than we are accustomed to up here, it's about time to get back into the hammer-swing of things. This year is an ambitious one, no less on account of having spent some quality time with old literature, maps (new and old), to plot out a series of areas to prospect all across the province. A significant amount of fieldwork is planned as part of a broader research project. This past weekend was the season opener for me, with temperatures hitting about 4 Celsius on Saturday, and near 12 Celsius on the Sunday. By now, almost all the snow has burned off, with just a few shadier spots remaining. This is the view as I set out through the bush around sunrise. The ground was still frozen, which was fine as it made trekking over mud much easier.
  10. Bowmanville, ON Finds

    Hi everyone, These were found in Bowmanville, ON, Canada, on the coast near Port Darlington. I would appreciate any help identifying these.
  11. Edriophus levis BATHER, 1914

    From the album Invertebrates

    Edriophus levis BATHER, 1914 Ordovician Bobcaygeon Formation Brechin Ontario Canada
  12. I've had this on my desk for years. I am almost positive I would have found it on the north shore of lake Erie in southwestern Ontario. Can anyone tell me what I am looking at?
  13. Edrioasteroid

    Here are two Edrioasteroids from the Verulam Fm. (Ordovician) near Brechin, Ontario, Canada. The first one might be Isorophusella? (specimen is 1 cm in diameter). The second one may not have enough present for ID: @crinus
  14. Hi again! This past summer I purchased a small rock with 4 edrioasteroids on it, and I was hoping to get your help in identifying them. The seller said that the rock is from the Upper Ordovician Verulam Formation in Gamebridge, Ontario, and he/she said that the following 3 species of edrioasteroid are on the rock: Cryptogoleus chapmani Isorophusella incondita Belochthus orthokolus Can anyone tell me the specific identity of each edrioasteroid? Thanks so much for your help! Monica Photo of the whole rock: The two edrioasteroids on the right side of the rock - one is quite big (we'll call it Specimen #1) and the other is quite small (we'll call is Specimen #2): The edrioasteroid in the middle of the rock (we'll call it Specimen #3): The edrioasteroid on the left side of the rock (we'll call is Specimen #4):
  15. Curious about a tooth found

    Evening all, we found this tooth about a year and a half ago in the shallow waters of Duck Lake in Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada, just a couple of inches below the sand. I have no clue what it is but I am guessing some sort of tooth - curious if anyone has any ideas. I have added one additional photo in the comments section as I couldn't make the pic any smaller to put in this original post. Thanks and let me know if more info is needed.
  16. dinosaur fossil shows in Ontario

    hi i am wondering are there any fossil shows in Ontario that have lots of dinosaur fossils thanks
  17. Favosites sp. from the Devonian Hungry Hollow member in Arkona, Canada. One of the more interesting corals I've collected, I'm trying to narrow down the species if possible. Any ideas?
  18. Unknown Widder formation cephalopod

    I found this orthocone a while back at Arkona (devonian) and I thought it was dolorthoceras, but now I am not so sure. It has a strange mark protruding from centre of each chamber. Any help would be appreciated! d!
  19. Hungry Hollow echinoderm

    Hello there! This past Saturday, I went on a "field trip" to Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario (mid-Devonian in age), and I found one weird item. It's an echinoderm of some sort, but which sort? A crinoid holdfast? Something else? Please see the photos below and let me know what you think. (By the way - I didn't make it home from work in time to take photos in natural light today, so I apologize for the fairly poor photo quality - if it's sunny tomorrow I can get better pictures then. And I also apologize for my blue finger in the photos - my students and I were looking at cheek cells under the compound light microscope today and some methylene blue got on my fingers - oops!) One end showing the pentaradial symmetry: The other end not showing much: Side photos: Thanks for your help! Monica
  20. Today Deb and I made the two hour drive up to just outside the town of Formosa, Ontario, to have a look at the Formosa reef limestone, which is part of the Amherstburg Formation. This road cut is the type locality for this material, and it was humbling to be at the exact same location that researchers of yesteryear such as Ludvigsen and Fagerstrom derived their material that formed the basis of their published work on it. Here are some shots of the road cut. Hardly does it justice. This represents a single, massive biohermal knoll. I've wanted to visit this site for a while now, having read two key papers on it. Most of the non-coral fossils are found on the south edge of the cut, as it is assumed that this was the windward side of the knoll that captured much of the debris swept in by the currents.
  21. Hi all, It's been a while since I posted a trip report but I was feeling like posting last evening as well as testing out my new photography rig. I moved houses two years ago and lost my lovely brick wall backdrop (the exterior of back of the house) which allowed photography in natural light. The new house is all vinyl siding outside and I have more shade so less opportunity for good sunlit pictures. However, one corner inside the house has a bricked area where a wood burning stove used to be so I have decided to set up some lights there. The pics came out ok so let's proceed with the report. I recently went up to the St. Mary's quarry in Bowmanville, Ontario on a scheduled trip with the local Scarborough club and also stopped off at Arkona while in Canada. I did pretty well at Arkona where I found four Eldredgeops trilobites and two Blastoids among other finds. Nucelocrinus elegans from the Hungry Hollow member of the Widder formation. Sorry, no pics of the Trilobites due to some back spasms but I got these pics of a nice Atactotoechus fruiticosus branch also from the Hungry Hollow Member of the Widder formation. Then I went to the St. Mary's quarry on Sunday where I took a tumble down the rock pile and hurt my ribs. Lucky for me my hard hat took the brunt of the impact my head made with the rocks. With nothing broken and still able to move around, I stayed closer to the ground and found this partial, eroded Isoltelus sp. that is inverted and still shows the Hypostome in place. I also found a plate with Graptolites but that was too heavy to hold and photograph last night. I'll post it tomorrow maybe. Finally, I drove home on Monday and stopped off at a place in New York where some of the Kashong Shale member of the Moscow formation is exposed and found these two surprises. A cephalon of a Dipleura dekayi with some of the shell material eroded away. I think the eye is intact and waiting to see again once some rock is removed. And here is a closeup of the shell on top where you can see the stippled pattern where sensory pits used to be. Lastly I found a pygidium that I am not sure of the genera on. Possibly a Basidechenella sp.? So not a bad trip at all, despite the injury. Good news is that I am healing nicely but still have some soreness and muscle spasms. I'm looking forward to my next trip up in the spring and hopefully will avoid the health scares.
  22. Thaleops? Cephalon?

    Found this one in Bowmanville (Mid Ordovician, Cobourg? Formation) last weekend. My best guess is Thaleops laurentiana cephalon but id like to have a better idea what it is before I attempt any more prep. Have not tried yet but probing with air abrasion looks like it will be difficult since the matrix is full of calcite or some other crystals. @Malcolmt @Kane @Northern Sharks
  23. No Idea Where to Start...

    My 5 year old found this near a river edge in Southern Ontario. Any ideas?
  24. New fossils

    Hi yesterday I went to the Ancaster gem and fossil show I got a couple things just wondering what do you think of them? First to last theropod bone fragment from cedar mountain formation Utah the they said it was found with identifyable bones that are theropod next dinosaur coperlite from Madagascar mahajanga formation last triceratops tooth hell creak Montana.
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