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Found 293 results

  1. Everyone so far is stumped

    This was found in Cayuga Ontario (Devonian) in 1988 and is still marked in my collection as an unknown. I have had a number of suggestions over the years as to what it is but nothing that screams that's it for sure. I always thought that it was echinoderm of some type but others have suggested eurypterid. Any thoughts. It was found at surface level of an abandoned water filled quarry so there is no assurance that it actually originated at that quarry but it probably did as it looked like the same matrix as the surrounding rock. Please jump in with your thoughts... I would really like to figure out what it is as I have nothing else that remotely looks like this
  2. I was determined to trace a shale layer into a hillside, and managed it: what a joy to discover more shell imprints. The genus I'm looking for is Rafinesquina, or something similar. Also got some colonies of things and trace fossils out of the muddy creek area. This place is the tip of the Georgian Bay formation that pokes into Oakville. It yields its treasures sparingly and you really have to work for it! The rocks were so heavy...I had a bag of goodies plus 3 heavy slabs...barely made it back to the car. I left 4 spectacular slabs that were too heavy to manage...might go back for them when I feel ambitious.
  3. Silurian fish?

    I found this concretion in what I believe to be Lockport dolostone, which is silurian in age. At first I didn't think much of it but then I noticed the surface has a faint texture of cracked shell. I was wondering if this could be a silurian ostracoderm like Tremataspis?
  4. I visited Etobicoke Creek again. This time it was near Evans Avenue at a recreational park. There was a softball game going on...the waif thought it might be something called 'rounders' and was intrigued to see how it progressed...I had to drag her the extra 30 meters to the creekbed. Orthocone nautiloids were scattered all over the place, embedded in rocks. The 'she' wanted to find a portion of several segments she could carry home...I get those, but she's never found one. (She eventually brought me a small trilobite, the first I've ever seen). The shell imprints were wonderful, but sometimes worn, and the same species as usual (Bysonnychia and generic bivalves). There were a couple of petrified sponge-like segments, but no good bryozoan colonies. It is fun to find nautiloids because you can sometimes find more than one in a rock (today we tied the record: 4!). Other times they are damaged so you can examine the interior structure. We filled my canvas bag quickly, serenaded by the sound of the softballs being hit off the bat. Finally, near the end of our expedition, the waif saw a segmented rock and tugged it out of the gravel...a portion of a monster cephalapod! Biggest of this genus I've ever seen...and two smaller ones had sheltered in the shell and perished there. What a great time we had.
  5. Can this be a trilobite?

    Is this little ~1.5 cm /half inch disk a trilobite? I've never found one before, and my wife found this today. No detail on bottom...it's all in the image. My attempts to brush off the sand have caused pieces to break off and crumble, so I'm not going to try to expose more. It was in an area full of orthocone nautiloids and byssonichia shell imprints.
  6. Hey guys, new collector looking for some wisdom. Over the past year, I've collected over 150 Fossil specimens from the Chatham-Kent Area. The Majority of my collection is Middle-Devonian Corals and Brachiopods, but I've also found some Petrified Wood and Fossilized Bone. I'm at the point where I can't keep track of my collection and want to start labeling and identifying my fossils for documentation and display purposes. What resources do you guys use to identify fossils you've collected in the field? How accurate can I realistically date things?
  7. Graptolite from Mimico Creek?

    Hello there! Well, I tried to take Viola out for a little fossil hunt by Mimico Creek in Etobicoke, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) this afternoon because when I checked the forecast this morning it looked like it was going to be ideal fossil-hunting weather - a mix of sun and cloud with temperatures in the mid-20s Celsius. When we arrived, however, it began to rain - we toughed it out and came away with one piece before it began to pour and we called it a day. I was disappointed since I was hoping to spend a few hours there, but the one piece we took home looks like it might have a graptolite on it, which is quite exciting since I have yet to find one in my local haunts. Please check out the photo below and let me know what you think: Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  8. Hello there! I was inspired by @markjw to check out the Credit River here in Mississauga, Ontario (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician) because where I normally hunt there are typically no corals and I'd love to add a couple to my collection. Consequently, I went out for about an hour this morning before the family got up in order to try my luck, and I'm happy to say that I was successful!!! Based on information provided by @FossilDAWG in other threads here on TFF, I think all of my colonial rugose corals are Favistina calcina - here are photos of three of my specimens: Specimen #1 - side view: Specimen #2 - top and bottom views: Specimen #3 - top and bottom views: more to come...
  9. Ice Age Human or Animal Teeth?

    Found an object among rocks which resembles eroded teeth enamel Location: Tobermory, Ontario Dimensions: Length: 4 cm Width: 2 cm Height: ~ 1 cm Any ideas?
  10. Hi. I have heard of Precambrian stromatolites found in the Precambrian rocks of Ontario but I am curious, has there been any reports of Ediacaran or Mistaken Point- like fossils being found in the Canadian Shield of Ontario?
  11. Paleofavosites asper

    From the album Hamilton, Ontario Fossils

    Paleofavosites asper (d’Orbigny, 1850). Coral squashed on grey shale. Found in the Manitoulin Formation of the Cataract Group on the Niagara Escarpment. Locality is the Devil’s Punchbowl, Stoney Creek, Hamilton, Ontario. Early Silurian.
  12. Here is an interesting potential fossil that I found in Oakville, Ontario. From fossils found in nearby rocks, I think this is from the Georgian bay formation which is ordovician in age. I don't know if this is a fossil, it could just be an interesting deposit of oxidized pyrite, but I would appreciate any help identifying this.
  13. Hello everyone! On Monday, I found a beautiful Treptoceras crebriseptum orthoconic nautiloid in a huge rock at Mimico Creek in the Etobicoke/Toronto area (Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician). It has been suggested that I might have a complete specimen, so I was hoping that someone out there might be able to let me know if this is the case or not. Here are some pictures... Whole specimen: Close-up of the base of the specimen (specimen has been turned over) - note that it is smoothly rounded and shows no septa - is this the fossilized living chamber of the animal? Close up of the tip of the specimen - note that it seems to end before the rock edge - is this the very tip of the animal? Close up of the piece that shattered off the tip of the specimen - note that it also seems to end before the rock edge: Thanks for your help!!! Monica
  14. Greenops from Hungry Hollow

    Hello again! I have one more ID request (for now ). I received this Greenops as a gift, but I think I deleted the email which stated the exact location/formation information - does anyone recognize the matrix that it's on? And is it G. widderensis or is it G. arkonensis? I have a document stating that these two species have been found at Hungry Hollow (near Arkona, Ontario, Canada; mid-Devonian in age) - are there two different Greenops species found at Hungry Hollow or only one (widderensis)? Thanks so much! Monica I'll tag @Kane and @middevonian for this one
  15. Favosites from Hungry Hollow

    Hi there! I'm currently writing labels for my Devonian fossils, and I was wondering if someone out there can identify the following Favosites coral down to species? It's from the South Pit of Hungry Hollow near Arkona, Ontario, Canada, and it's mid-Devonian in age. Thanks so much! Monica Top: Bottom:
  16. Arkona Crinoid prep

    Here is a Corocrinus calypso I found in the south pit at Hungry Hollow last fall (southern Ontario, Canada, Devonian age). In the past these were a common find in the Arkona formation, but access to the productive outcrops is becoming rare. I stumbled upon this one on top of the northern end of the pit. Sitting there in ten pieces and eroding away, I was lucky to have found it before it turned to dust. The matrix is more solid than the usual clay which makes up the Arkona so I believe it was weathering out of a concretion. I glued the bits that obviously fit together and it ended up in a box with my other Arkona keepers. Two weeks ago I was looking through the collection and decided to prep one of the nicer chunks. After messing around for an hour or so I realized that everything fit together into one piece. Cool! There are some gaps as the edges are worn but I'll take it. Most of my prep experience has been on E. rana from Penn Dixie which are usually quite sturdy and forgiving (I'm not very patient but luckily have not ruined a fossil yet). With this probably being my favourite find to date, it was time to turn down the psi and take my time. I think it is coming along nicely after seven or eight hours of work. Planning to spend another seven hours on it this week to finish it off. Not a lengthy prep for some, but certainly my longest so far.
  17. Belochthus orthokolus

    From the album Echinoderm Collection

    Belochthus orthokolus (Bell, 1976). Found in the Verulam formation, Gamebridge, Ontario, Canada. Middle Ordovician. Obtained online as a purchase. The edrio is about 1.8 cm long.
  18. Arkona 07/06/2019

    As usual I had the urge to go fossil hunting this weekend so I decided to take a trip to Arkona and have a relaxing day of surface collecting. It was calling for rain all week but turned out to be a nice day (aside from the brutal heat and swarming deer flies). Things were looking a little different this year. Spring hit this roadway to one of the pits pretty hard. Critters everywhere so you have to watch your step. There were loads of tiny toads that must have just grown up and left the water. Also found this poor strawberry plant struggling on top of a hill in poor soil but somehow managed to fruit And now for the fossils... I didn't have any luck finding the blastoid or crinoid I was after but I did take a few things home. Some corals Aulocystis ramosa, Platyaxum frondosum Favosites sp. A brach species I didnt have yet and a large Callipleura Nucleospira concinna, Callipleura nobilis An interesting bryozoan and a cluster of tube worms unknown bryozoan, Spirorbis sp. Gastropods Platyceras bucculentum, Naticonema lineata Possible arthropod trackway? And a new trilo species for me. Beaten up but I'll take it. The cephalon+partial thorax look like Basidechenella Pseudodechenella arkonensis. The pygidium looks like Crassiproetus crassimarginatus (top one was found last year).
  19. I was able to fit in some prospecting for new sites while the missus had a week off from work. Obviously I couldn’t monopolize all the vacation as the main purpose was to visit a relative and lounge on a beach. Regularly accessible and productive Ordovician sites in Ontario are few and far between, mostly relegated these days to the biannual trip to the quarry in Bowmanville, or to the creeks around the greater Toronto area (GTA). Trilobite collecting in Ontario is massively curtailed by a confluence of factors sadly common in so many other areas: development, quarries that no longer permit access (even to clubs), laws governing protected areas, and over-collecting. We have a rich abundance of trilobites in Ontario, just as in New York, but accessible sites remain a problem. This means defaulting to the traditional method of prospecting new potential areas, and even putting a hard shoulder into shovelling a lot of soil to expose bedrock. This means smaller areas that are more easily exhausted. A pic of our haul from the two spots:
  20. Any ideas on what this might be? It's about 25cm long on a rock in a parking lot in Oakville, Ontario. Looks nothing like the local rocks and surely brought in from elsewhere. Much of the local area is Ordovician or Silurian, but who knows from how far it came.
  21. A walk on the shore west of Toronto turned out to be another fossil day. Some photos of as yet unevaluated things attached.
  22. The quarried rocks at "Gairloch Park" in Oakville were disappointing, but, as usual, the walk to the parking lot did not disappoint. I walked on a nice rock with fossil colonies (maybe they are bryozoans?) and shells.
  23. Brantford, Ontario Geology??

    Hey guys, So I discovered there is actually GO transit service from Hamilton, Ontario to Brantford, Ontario and Im actually excited to discover this (HOORAY!!). Does anyone know the geology of the city? Im also looking for papers/files that can help me know what to find there. Thanks for any help!
  24. Predation Marks on Hebertella?

    Hi guys so I have this Hebertella occidentalis specimen I collected yesterday from the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario, which belongs to the Upper Member of the Georgian Bay Formation. Do these look like predation marks? There are also what appears to some crystallized grains inside these marks and I think they could be some sort of calcite. Sorry for the noisy grain of the image, but I hope this will help.
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