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Found 11 results

  1. I used to be a member her many years ago when young Knackers McGee started the site showing off his wonderful finds, time marches on, now i have somethig to contribute of note. I aquired a collection of Gem grade Opalised Plesiosaur bones, mainly half verterbrae, whatsit called, split vertically. Included, was one unknown perfect split shown below. If anyone is interested in such things, I can post more pics and links to videos for your amusement. This image is of the best split, most likely broken in the field by the pick. The central inclusions are very shallow. I could not believe my luck as the person who sold then to me did not recognise the bones in the parcel. Sadly I did not buy all of it, so there is or are people out there with half a dozen matchng halves to what I have. Some of the pieces have great detail of bone structure on the outside, some look to have internal passages preserved in great detail. Veins or ateries not opalised within the Opal. All very rare to find as ordinary fossilised bone, opalised is very very rare.
  2. Some of it is eroded so makes it a little tricky. I've come up with the following so am humbly requesting anyone who is able to verify or correct. Thanks. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Mesodesmatidae Genus: Paphies
  3. Cant find comparable, need help!

    Hey all this is my first time posting here! I found a fossil (i think) that i need some help identifying. Its unlike most fossils i have seen. I work in landscaping so i see a lot of rocks, this one was different and appeared to have all sorts of shells and mollusks trapped inside. I cracked it open to find it was full of bones, iridescent bones that looked like an oil sheen had dried over them. I have tried to look up opalization but find mostly plants and nothing really comparable. I need help! More pictures available on request. The pictures do no capture the true sheen of the bones and some of the opal looking substance has started to oxidize i think. You can see where it is starting to peel away. Some of the bones that cracked in half revealed more fossils inside the bones including a large grub worm looking thing sticking out of one. I was only able to fit these 2 pictures per the limit, just ask for more. Thanks for any help!
  4. Opalised Bivalve Shell #2

    From the album Opalised Fossils

    Name: Opalised Bivalve Shell Age: 110 million years old Locality: Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia Formation: Griman Creek Formation Length: 32mm long Notes: This is another opalised shell from my collection, kindly given to me by my friend Shaun. Thanks mate!
  5. Opalised Belemnite #2

    From the album Opalised Fossils

    Name: Opalised Belemnite Pipe Age: 120 million years old Locality: Coober Pedy, South Australia Length: 52mm long
  6. Opalised Belemnite #1

    From the album Opalised Fossils

    Name: Opalised Belemnite Pipe Age: 120 million years old Locality: Coober Pedy, South Australia Length: 60mm long Notes: This is an opalised belemnite pipe from Australia. It originates from the Cretaceous marine deposits of Coober Pedy and is transparent when held up to a strong light. It is also quite a large example.
  7. Opalised Bivalve Shell #1

    From the album Opalised Fossils

    Name: Opalised Bivalve Shell Age: 110 million years old Locality: Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia Formation: Griman Creek Formation Length: 25mm Notes: This is an opalised bivalve shell from Australia. Unlike the marine shells from Coober Pedy, the other hotspot for opalised fossils in Australia, the shells from Lightning Ridge are less common and come from a freshwater river environment. This one is open, and clearly shows the ridged pattern of the shell it once was. A nice addition to my opal fossil collection.
  8. Opalised Dinosaur Vertebra (Photo 2)

    From the album Opalised Fossils

    Name: Opalised Dinosaur (Caudal?) Vertebra Age: 110 million years old Locality: Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia Formation: Griman Creek Formation Length: 16mm end to end Notes: This is an opalised dinosaur vertebra from Australia. I originally bought it as an opalised 'reptile' vertebra but it's ID as being a dinosaur vertebra was confirmed by one of the leading experts on the opalised fossils of Lightning Ridge. It is likely a juvenile ornithopod or theropod vertebral centrum, missing the tall neural arch. It is semi-transparent when held up to a strong light and is an exceptionally rare specimen. So far it is the only vertebrate fossil in my opalised fossils collection but I hope I am able to acquire more soon. Specimens like this very rarely come up for sale as most of them end up in museum collections due to their rarity and scientific value
  9. Opalised Dinosaur Vertebra (Photo 1)

    From the album Opalised Fossils

    Name: Opalised Dinosaur (Caudal?) Vertebra Age: 110 million years old Locality: Lightning Ridge, NSW, Australia Formation: Griman Creek Formation Length: 16mm end to end Notes: This is an opalised dinosaur vertebra from Australia. I originally bought it as an opalised 'reptile' vertebra but it's ID as being a dinosaur vertebra was confirmed by one of the leading experts on the opalised fossils of Lightning Ridge. It is likely a juvenile ornithopod or theropod vertebral centrum, missing the tall neural arch. It is semi-transparent when held up to a strong light and is an exceptionally rare specimen. So far it is the only vertebrate fossil in my opalised fossils collection but I hope I am able to acquire more soon. Specimens like this very rarely come up for sale as most of them end up in museum collections due to their rarity and scientific value.
  10. Opalised Fish Vertebrae

    Good afternoon, Well here goes my first post and I hope some of you might find it interesting. Two years ago, we found this in our mine at White Cliffs NSW. For those of you who don’t know, White Cliffs is an opal mining community and was Australians first commercial opal field and today it still produces some of the finest opal in the world. You will hear people say that mining there is non-existent as it is mined out; well nothing is further from the truth. Only one percent of the field has actually been mined, so there are still lots of discoveries being made. Anyway, I am getting off track. Here are a couple of photographs of the opal when we found it and what has been partially cleaned so far. The whole fossil when finally reassembled will be about 20cm long and tapers from 16mm wide at the top down to 10mm wide at the end. I was surprised at the quality of the opal. When we first uncovered it, it appeared to be mostly potch, however on cleanup, it runs about 90% precious opal. It is all full colour opal, and varies between $2500 per carat and about $100 per carat. Most of the opal would value at $500 per carat and so working on an overall average value of $350 per carat, the opal value of this fossil alone is around AUD$25,000. There is still a fine layer of white clay across most of the opal which makes the colour almost impossible to photograph, but it really is a beautiful specimen (there is still more pieces to be cleaned to be added – the photos are incomplete). If I may ask advice from the forum, I would really like to lightly polish the opal while still retaining the fine detail of the individual vertebrae and at the same time displaying the brilliant colours of this opal – would this be recommended or frowned upon by fossil collectors? I plan to reassemble the fossil using a clear two pack resin (same as we use for mounting opal in settings), would this be ok, or should I be reassembling it by another means? The original sandstone it was found in was very friable and decayed quickly. Should I mount it on a small block of sandstone (or maybe basalt, I think it would look spectacular with the black background in contrast). There is still a lot more cleaning to go yet and many smaller pieces to be reassembled, but any advice would really be appreciated and comments welcomed. Best wishes and thank you for your time, Chris.
  11. Opalised Dino Tooth? Pic Heavy

    Hello everyone I have recently obtained an opal parcel of rough to cut into gems from the opal fields at lightning ridge Australia, however right before I was about to grind this one rough opal something stood out. I remembered walking in the natural history museum in Sidney Australia and noticed the opalized teeth of varies animals/dinos etc. This one was just like one I had seen many years ago. I cleaned it only; no polish just water and a soft paintbrush as not to alter it. From my research, I found a possible match a Hypsilophodon it lived in the area where lightning ridge opals are found and some recorded fossils of this dino are sometimes unearthed there in small pieces. I have tried to contact museums and or universities as I live near OSU and they have one of the best paleontological programs in the country (or so I’m told) and have not heard back after 6 months of trying from any of them. I would like to know if it is a real opal replacement of a tooth or a lookalike. It measures 13.33mm long X 10.9mm wide X 4.02mm thick. And is very detailed under a microscope with tooth like root. Any ideas? I have cut thousands of opals from rough, and have seen millions of pieces of rough easy, including opalized fossils, even some plesiosaurs teeth but never this. The miner, who sold me the opals, said that he has been finding some opalized dino bone fragments lately but they are unidentifiable as they are crushed, and very small pieces, and I also purchased a opalized finger or toe bone from a very nearby find, possibly a turtle flipper bone.
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