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Found 28 results

  1. Hey All, I don't know if there is even enough of a fossil here to identify. I am nowhere near good enough to give a real good guess. First thought was either a small piece of a cephlapod or chiton. If it is a gastropod, it is a type that I have never found before. It was found on the side of a dry creek bed near Willow Springs, Missouri, USA in an Ordovician Formation. The remnant that remains measures 13mm wide by 15mm long. The bed the fossil remnant is laying is measures 24mm long. There is an indented type of division going horizontally across the fossil. It does not go all the way through to make the remnant two separates segments though (just an indentation type of division line). Other fossils in the same rock include gastropods, a brachiopod and what looks like a very worn rugose coral. If anyone can give me a probably identification, I would appreciate it.
  2. Once again, I am studying and working on my own identifications. I am just needing someone to either confirm or correct me on this one. My first guess when I saw it was it was a gastropod of some sort, but after researching and looking at images online, my guess is that it is an internal cast of a hyolith. It was found in northwest Howell County, Missouri, USA. The fossil in question measures approximately 16mm and the host rock measures 80mm across. The widest point across of the cavity where the fossil in question lies is 8mm. Once again, I am truly appreciative of any help that you are willing to give me. Doug
  3. First point, I cannot get a decent image of this fossil to save my life. That being said, I took a bunch of sub par image in hopes someone can put the pieces together to come up with an id. It measures approximately 35x22mm and is definitely a different material than the host rock. I found it in the same area that I have been finding all of my other fossils. This is outside Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. I originally thought it might be a rugose coral of some sort, but it looks to have horizontal segments or something similar. I am about 95% (or more) positive that it is a fossil and not just geology. I will continue working on attempting to get better images. If I do, I will add them to the thread. Thank you for your assistance.
  4. Crystalized fossil or a pipe dream?

    I have a rock feature that I am a bit doubtful, but hopeful about. I have a few "crystalized" fossils and have seen some very nice ones from near my hunting area also posted. This does mean that there are some out there. This little feature measures almost 11mm long and is 6mm wide. In hand, the left side really looks like a head segment of some sort with the line and what does look like two eye spots. The main area has what looks like segment end features going around the sides. The square crystal feature in the center is a totally new one for me. I have found literally hundreds, if not thousands of crystal specimens (mostly in the quartz family) and have never seen anything like this. This rock has several other fossil and fossil imprints in it. There are cephlapod fossils, rugose coral fossils, and other features that I am still researching. Researching and using the state geological map, it was found in a late ordovician period area. It was found outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. My hopes are that it is a trilobite fossil of some sort or an isopod fossil. I am NOT getting my hopes up real high though.
  5. Hi All, Why am I not finding any trilobites (or even any identifiable trilobite partials)? I know the obvious two answers would be that I am either overlooking them or I am hunting in an area that they will not be located in. I am hunting outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA in what I believe to be Ordovician Period rock. I am finding all sorts of crinoid, brachiopod, gastropod, bryozoa, rugose, favistella fossils and more. I have even found a large stromatolite reef but I cannot find a trilobite fossil. I would think with the diversity of the fossils that I am finding, trilobite fossils (pieces, partials or whole) would show up at least once. The trilobite is THE bucket list fossil for me and if I need to change my method of searching or my area of searching I want to do that. Virtually all of the fossils that I am finding are "field walking" finds. I either find them in seasonal creek beds, areas of erosion or areas where dirt and rock have been removed or disturbed, if that makes any difference. Thanks for your time and any advice that you can give me.
  6. We have a fist-sized glass-like object that contains 22 microscopic organisms from the Cambrian and Ordovician periods. We theorize that it was produced by a meteor impacting sand and water resulting in perfectly preserved organisms, some of which also have soft tissue preserved. We do not have equipment to investigate this object any further and are seeking someone to help validate this finding. Does anyone have knowledge of a clear glass "rock" with encapsulated 500 mya organisms ever being found?
  7. Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite Llandeilo Series of England Ordovician Period (485.4–443.8 million years ago) The trilobite measures 5/8 by 5/8 inches and is on a matrix measuring 1 1/4 by 1 1/4 inches. Lloydolithus is a genus of trilobites from the Late Ordovician of Europe. Ecology: fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeder. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Lloydolithus Species: †lloyodi
  8. Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lloydolithus lloydi Trilobite Llandeilo Series of England Ordovician Period (485.4–443.8 million years ago) The trilobite measures 5/8 by 5/8 inches and is on a matrix measuring 1 1/4 by 1 1/4 inches. Lloydolithus is a genus of trilobites from the Late Ordovician of Europe. Ecology: fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeder. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Lloydolithus Species: †lloyodi
  9. Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name Ophiuroidea is derived from the Ancient Greek word meaning "serpent". The Ophiuroidea contain two large clades, Ophiurida (brittle stars) and Euryalida (basket stars). Over 2,000 species of brittle stars live today. More than 1200 of these species are found in deep waters, greater than 200 m deep. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: Eleutherozoa Class: Ophiuroidea Order: Ophiurida Suborder: Ophiurina Family: †Aplocomidae Genus: †Geocoma Species: †corinata
  10. Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name Ophiuroidea is derived from the Ancient Greek word meaning "serpent". The Ophiuroidea contain two large clades, Ophiurida (brittle stars) and Euryalida (basket stars). Over 2,000 species of brittle stars live today. More than 1200 of these species are found in deep waters, greater than 200 m deep. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: Eleutherozoa Class: Ophiuroidea Order: Ophiurida Suborder: Ophiurina Family: †Aplocomidae Genus: †Geocoma Species: †corinata
  11. Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name Ophiuroidea is derived from the Ancient Greek word meaning "serpent". The Ophiuroidea contain two large clades, Ophiurida (brittle stars) and Euryalida (basket stars). Over 2,000 species of brittle stars live today. More than 1200 of these species are found in deep waters, greater than 200 m deep. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: Eleutherozoa Class: Ophiuroidea Order: Ophiurida Suborder: Ophiurina Family: †Aplocomidae Genus: †Geocoma Species: †corinata
  12. Geocoma Corinata - Morocco 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Geocoma corinata Brittle Star Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 million years ago) Geocoma is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived in the Jurassic. These are slow-moving low-level epifaunal detritivore-suspension feeders. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name Ophiuroidea is derived from the Ancient Greek word meaning "serpent". The Ophiuroidea contain two large clades, Ophiurida (brittle stars) and Euryalida (basket stars). Over 2,000 species of brittle stars live today. More than 1200 of these species are found in deep waters, greater than 200 m deep. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: Eleutherozoa Class: Ophiuroidea Order: Ophiurida Suborder: Ophiurina Family: †Aplocomidae Genus: †Geocoma Species: †corinata
  13. Orthida brachiopod.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Order Orthida brachiopod Pennsylvania, USA Ordovician Period (485.4 -443.8 million years ago) Orthida is an extinct order of brachiopods which appeared during the Early Cambrian period and became very diverse by the Ordovician, living in shallow-shelf seas. Orthids are the oldest member of the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea, and is the order from which all other brachiopods of this group stem. Physically they are usually strophic, with well-developed interareas. They also commonly have radiating ribs, sulcus, and fold structures. Typically one valve, often the brachial valve, is flatter than the other. The interior structure of the brachial valves are usually simple. In shape they are sub-circular to elliptical, with typically biconvex valves. There is some debate over the forms that first appeared of this order as to how they should be classified. However, they began to differentiate themselves by the late Early Cambrian period, and by the late Cambrian period had diversified into numerous varieties and reach 2 to 5 cm in width. Specimens from the late Cambrian to the earliest Ordovician exhibit shells with rounded and pointed pedical valves, with sharp to obtuse extremities and ridges that are fine to course. Punctate shells appear during the mid-Ordovician, which establish the suborder Dalmanellidina. The Ordovician is a productive period which gives rise to numerous genera in this order. However, they started to become greatly reduced by the end of the Ordovician extinction event. Both the impunctate and punctate survived through to the early Devonian Eventually, though, only the punctate lived on, and would play a minor role in benthic ecosystems until the late Permian, when they became extinct. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida
  14. Cnemidopyge parva trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cnemidopyge parva trilobite Llandelian, Llandrndod Wells, Radnor, Wales Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 Million years ago) Cnemidopyge is a genus of trilobites that lived during the Ordovician. Like all Raphiophorids it is blind, with a headshield (or cephalon) that is subtriangular to subsemicircular, carrying genal spines and a forward directed rapier-like spine on the central raised area (or glabella), with the front of the glabella inflated and the natural fracture lines (or sutures) of the cephalon coinciding with its margin. It may be easily distinguished from other raphiophorids by the rectangular thorax with 6 segments, where other genera have a different number of segments and segments change in width over the length of the thorax. Uniquely in this genus, the inner pleural region of the frontal segment is enlarged. Also the axis (or rhachis) and pleural fields of the pygidium are strongly segmented. The trilobite measures 5/8" long and is on a matrix measuring 1 3/8 by 1 1/8 ". Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Suborder:† Trinucleina Family: †Raphiophoridae Subfamily: †Raphiophorinae Genus: †Cnemidopyge Species: †parva
  15. Cnemidopyge parva trilobite 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cnemidopyge parva trilobite Llandelian, Llandrndod Wells, Radnor, Wales Ordovician Period (485.4-443.8 Million years ago) Cnemidopyge is a genus of trilobites that lived during the Ordovician. Like all Raphiophorids it is blind, with a headshield (or cephalon) that is subtriangular to subsemicircular, carrying genal spines and a forward directed rapier-like spine on the central raised area (or glabella), with the front of the glabella inflated and the natural fracture lines (or sutures) of the cephalon coinciding with its margin. It may be easily distinguished from other raphiophorids by the rectangular thorax with 6 segments, where other genera have a different number of segments and segments change in width over the length of the thorax. Uniquely in this genus, the inner pleural region of the frontal segment is enlarged. Also the axis (or rhachis) and pleural fields of the pygidium are strongly segmented. The trilobite measures 5/8" long and is on a matrix measuring 1 3/8 by 1 1/8 ". Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Suborder:† Trinucleina Family: †Raphiophoridae Subfamily: †Raphiophorinae Genus: †Cnemidopyge Species: †parva
  16. Starfish Fossil Stenaster

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stenaster sp. Extinct Starfish Ktaoua Formation, Kaid Rami, Morocco Ordovician Period - (450 millions years ago) Stenaster is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived from the Ordovician to the Silurian. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name Ophiuroidea is derived from the Ancient Greek word meaning "serpent". The Ophiuroidea contain two large clades, Ophiurida (brittle stars) and Euryalida (basket stars). Over 2,000 species of brittle stars live today. More than 1200 of these species are found in deep waters, greater than 200 m deep. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: Eleutherozoa Class: Ophiuroidea Family: †Stenasteridae Genus: †Stenaster
  17. Starfish Fossil Stenaster

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stenaster sp. Extinct Starfish Ktaoua Formation, Kaid Rami, Morocco Ordovician Period - (450 millions years ago) Stenaster is an extinct genus of brittle stars that lived from the Ordovician to the Silurian. Brittle stars or ophiuroids are echinoderms in the class Ophiuroidea closely related to starfish. They crawl across the sea floor using their flexible arms for locomotion. The ophiuroids generally have five long, slender, whip-like arms which may reach up to 60 cm (24 in) in length on the largest specimens. They are also known as serpent stars; the New Latin class name Ophiuroidea is derived from the Ancient Greek word meaning "serpent". The Ophiuroidea contain two large clades, Ophiurida (brittle stars) and Euryalida (basket stars). Over 2,000 species of brittle stars live today. More than 1200 of these species are found in deep waters, greater than 200 m deep. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: Eleutherozoa Class: Ophiuroidea Family: †Stenasteridae Genus: †Stenaster
  18. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from the Greek graptos, meaning "written", and lithos, meaning "rock", as many graptolite fossils resemble hieroglyphs written on the rock. Linnaeus originally regarded them as 'pictures resembling fossils' rather than true fossils, though later workers supposed them to be related to the hydrozoans. Since the 1970s, as a result of advances in electron microscopy, graptolites have generally been thought to be most closely allied to the pterobranchs, a rare group of modern marine animals belonging to the phylum Hemichordata (hemichordates). Comparisons are drawn with the modern hemichordates Cephalodiscus and Rhabdopleura. Graptolites are common fossils and have a worldwide distribution. The preservation, quantity and gradual change over a geologic time scale of graptolites allows the fossils to be used to date strata of rocks throughout the world. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. The most conspicuous character is the wide perforated fringe of the head. Trinucleids have a relatively large headshield, that is characterized by a highly vaulted pear-shaped glabella, separated by deep furrows from the cheeks that are often vaulted too, but less so. To the front and sides of this tri-nucleate centre is a wide seam (or fringe), that often inclinates towards the outer margin, and is perforated by funnel shaped pits. These pits are only in one row at the front in the first occurring genera, irregularly distributed in early species, but in later species these are largely arranged in several rows parallel to the margin, and in arches more or less perpendicular to the margin. The thorax consists of six short but wide segments, the outline of which is a continuation of the cheeks. The axis is narrow, less than ?× as wide as each of the ribs (or pleurae) to its sides. The tailshield, termed pygidium, is small, approximately wide triangular, with the axis narrow triangular, reaching the border. The axial rings and ribs become less conspicuous further to the back. Trinucleids lived in deeper water. At first, the pits in the fringe were considered to have a sensory function, but the suggestion that they may play a role in filtering food particles now seems generally accepted. Taxonomy is split - Graptolite first, trilobite second. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Hemichordata/Arthropoda Class: †Graptolithina/†Trilobita Order: †Graptoloidea/†Asaphida Family: †Diplograptidae/†Trinucleidae Genus: †Diplograptus/†Cryptolithoides Species: †amplexicaulis/†ulrichi
  19. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from the Greek graptos, meaning "written", and lithos, meaning "rock", as many graptolite fossils resemble hieroglyphs written on the rock. Linnaeus originally regarded them as 'pictures resembling fossils' rather than true fossils, though later workers supposed them to be related to the hydrozoans. Since the 1970s, as a result of advances in electron microscopy, graptolites have generally been thought to be most closely allied to the pterobranchs, a rare group of modern marine animals belonging to the phylum Hemichordata (hemichordates). Comparisons are drawn with the modern hemichordates Cephalodiscus and Rhabdopleura. Graptolites are common fossils and have a worldwide distribution. The preservation, quantity and gradual change over a geologic time scale of graptolites allows the fossils to be used to date strata of rocks throughout the world. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. The most conspicuous character is the wide perforated fringe of the head. Trinucleids have a relatively large headshield, that is characterized by a highly vaulted pear-shaped glabella, separated by deep furrows from the cheeks that are often vaulted too, but less so. To the front and sides of this tri-nucleate centre is a wide seam (or fringe), that often inclinates towards the outer margin, and is perforated by funnel shaped pits. These pits are only in one row at the front in the first occurring genera, irregularly distributed in early species, but in later species these are largely arranged in several rows parallel to the margin, and in arches more or less perpendicular to the margin. The thorax consists of six short but wide segments, the outline of which is a continuation of the cheeks. The axis is narrow, less than ?× as wide as each of the ribs (or pleurae) to its sides. The tailshield, termed pygidium, is small, approximately wide triangular, with the axis narrow triangular, reaching the border. The axial rings and ribs become less conspicuous further to the back. Trinucleids lived in deeper water. At first, the pits in the fringe were considered to have a sensory function, but the suggestion that they may play a role in filtering food particles now seems generally accepted. Taxonomy is split - Graptolite first, trilobite second. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Hemichordata/Arthropoda Class: †Graptolithina/†Trilobita Order: †Graptoloidea/†Asaphida Family: †Diplograptidae/†Trinucleidae Genus: †Diplograptus/†Cryptolithoides Species: †amplexicaulis/†ulrichi
  20. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from the Greek graptos, meaning "written", and lithos, meaning "rock", as many graptolite fossils resemble hieroglyphs written on the rock. Linnaeus originally regarded them as 'pictures resembling fossils' rather than true fossils, though later workers supposed them to be related to the hydrozoans. Since the 1970s, as a result of advances in electron microscopy, graptolites have generally been thought to be most closely allied to the pterobranchs, a rare group of modern marine animals belonging to the phylum Hemichordata (hemichordates). Comparisons are drawn with the modern hemichordates Cephalodiscus and Rhabdopleura. Graptolites are common fossils and have a worldwide distribution. The preservation, quantity and gradual change over a geologic time scale of graptolites allows the fossils to be used to date strata of rocks throughout the world. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. The most conspicuous character is the wide perforated fringe of the head. Trinucleids have a relatively large headshield, that is characterized by a highly vaulted pear-shaped glabella, separated by deep furrows from the cheeks that are often vaulted too, but less so. To the front and sides of this tri-nucleate centre is a wide seam (or fringe), that often inclinates towards the outer margin, and is perforated by funnel shaped pits. These pits are only in one row at the front in the first occurring genera, irregularly distributed in early species, but in later species these are largely arranged in several rows parallel to the margin, and in arches more or less perpendicular to the margin. The thorax consists of six short but wide segments, the outline of which is a continuation of the cheeks. The axis is narrow, less than ?× as wide as each of the ribs (or pleurae) to its sides. The tailshield, termed pygidium, is small, approximately wide triangular, with the axis narrow triangular, reaching the border. The axial rings and ribs become less conspicuous further to the back. Trinucleids lived in deeper water. At first, the pits in the fringe were considered to have a sensory function, but the suggestion that they may play a role in filtering food particles now seems generally accepted. Taxonomy is split - Graptolite first, trilobite second. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Hemichordata/Arthropoda Class: †Graptolithina/†Trilobita Order: †Graptoloidea/†Asaphida Family: †Diplograptidae/†Trinucleidae Genus: †Diplograptus/†Cryptolithoides Species: †amplexicaulis/†ulrichi
  21. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplograptus amplexicaulis Graptolite & Cryptolithoides ulrichi Trilobite on matrix SITE LOCATION: Viola Limestone, Murray County, Oklahoma, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Diplograptus was a Cambrian genus of graptolites. Graptolithina is a class of hemichordate animal, the members of which are known as graptolites. Graptolites are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). The name graptolite comes from the Greek graptos, meaning "written", and lithos, meaning "rock", as many graptolite fossils resemble hieroglyphs written on the rock. Linnaeus originally regarded them as 'pictures resembling fossils' rather than true fossils, though later workers supposed them to be related to the hydrozoans. Since the 1970s, as a result of advances in electron microscopy, graptolites have generally been thought to be most closely allied to the pterobranchs, a rare group of modern marine animals belonging to the phylum Hemichordata (hemichordates). Comparisons are drawn with the modern hemichordates Cephalodiscus and Rhabdopleura. Graptolites are common fossils and have a worldwide distribution. The preservation, quantity and gradual change over a geologic time scale of graptolites allows the fossils to be used to date strata of rocks throughout the world. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. The most conspicuous character is the wide perforated fringe of the head. Trinucleids have a relatively large headshield, that is characterized by a highly vaulted pear-shaped glabella, separated by deep furrows from the cheeks that are often vaulted too, but less so. To the front and sides of this tri-nucleate centre is a wide seam (or fringe), that often inclinates towards the outer margin, and is perforated by funnel shaped pits. These pits are only in one row at the front in the first occurring genera, irregularly distributed in early species, but in later species these are largely arranged in several rows parallel to the margin, and in arches more or less perpendicular to the margin. The thorax consists of six short but wide segments, the outline of which is a continuation of the cheeks. The axis is narrow, less than ?× as wide as each of the ribs (or pleurae) to its sides. The tailshield, termed pygidium, is small, approximately wide triangular, with the axis narrow triangular, reaching the border. The axial rings and ribs become less conspicuous further to the back. Trinucleids lived in deeper water. At first, the pits in the fringe were considered to have a sensory function, but the suggestion that they may play a role in filtering food particles now seems generally accepted. Taxonomy is split - Graptolite first, trilobite second. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Hemichordata/Arthropoda Class: †Graptolithina/†Trilobita Order: †Graptoloidea/†Asaphida Family: †Diplograptidae/†Trinucleidae Genus: †Diplograptus/†Cryptolithoides Species: †amplexicaulis/†ulrichi
  22. Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Phragmolites is an extinct genus of molluscs in the family Bucaniidae, paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position possibly being either Gastropods or Monoplacophorans in the superfamily Bellerophontoidea. The family lived from the Lower Ordovician to the Devonian and have shells in which the apertural margins tend to flare. Most genera have a slit and selenizone, others some modification of this feature. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Bellerophontida Family: †Bucaniidae Genus: †Phragmolites Species: †fimbriata
  23. Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Phragmolites is an extinct genus of molluscs in the family Bucaniidae, paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position possibly being either Gastropods or Monoplacophorans in the superfamily Bellerophontoidea. The family lived from the Lower Ordovician to the Devonian and have shells in which the apertural margins tend to flare. Most genera have a slit and selenizone, others some modification of this feature. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Bellerophontida Family: †Bucaniidae Genus: †Phragmolites Species: †fimbriata
  24. Receptaculites a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Receptaculites SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Receptaculites is the name-bearing genus for an extinct group of conspicuous benthic marine genera, the Receptaculitidae, that lived from the Early Ordovician through the Permian period, peaking in the Middle Ordovician. The group's phylogenetic origin has long been obscure, but the current understanding is that the Receptaculitidae were calcareous algae, probably of the Order Dasycladales. Receptaculitids lived in warm, shallow seas and have been described from all continents except Antarctica. In some areas they were important reef-formers, and they also occur as isolated specimens. Receptaculites and its relatives have a double-spiral, radiating pattern of rhombus-shaped plates supported by spindle-like objects called meroms. Fossils can usually be identified by the intersecting patterns of clockwise and counterclockwise rows of plates or stalk spaces, superficially similar to the arrangement of disk florets on a sunflower -- hence the common name "sunflower coral" Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Chlorophyta Class: Chlorophyceae Order: Dasycladales Family: †Receptaculitidae Genus: †Receptaculites
  25. Receptaculites a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Receptaculites SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Receptaculites is the name-bearing genus for an extinct group of conspicuous benthic marine genera, the Receptaculitidae, that lived from the Early Ordovician through the Permian period, peaking in the Middle Ordovician. The group's phylogenetic origin has long been obscure, but the current understanding is that the Receptaculitidae were calcareous algae, probably of the Order Dasycladales. Receptaculitids lived in warm, shallow seas and have been described from all continents except Antarctica. In some areas they were important reef-formers, and they also occur as isolated specimens. Receptaculites and its relatives have a double-spiral, radiating pattern of rhombus-shaped plates supported by spindle-like objects called meroms. Fossils can usually be identified by the intersecting patterns of clockwise and counterclockwise rows of plates or stalk spaces, superficially similar to the arrangement of disk florets on a sunflower -- hence the common name "sunflower coral" Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Chlorophyta Class: Chlorophyceae Order: Dasycladales Family: †Receptaculitidae Genus: †Receptaculites
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