Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'ordovician'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 1,145 results

  1. What is this?

    Just came back from a short trip to the driftless region of SW Wisconsin and we found a strange fossil in a road cut. I thought it was an algae at first, but I can't find any similar images. Sort of just looks like the rims of a rugose coral, but tiny? Found in Platteville formation.
  2. I am posting some pics of my trip to Etobicoke, Ontario on the Georgian Bay formation, Lower Member. I only went a couple times to different localities in Etobicoke since the lockdown put a strain on my wanted public transportation service. I visited the Humber River and Mimico Creek. I only came home with 2 specimens from the Humber while I didnt take anything home from Mimico. This year's winter has been mild so that is why I believe there has not been any turn around for [good/unusual/extraordinary] material. I recall back in 2015, which had a rough and severe winter, generated more good fossils for me than this year's mild winter. I didnt have to do a lot of digging and just surface collecting just to find good specimens when the winter is rough before the following Spring and Summer. The ice didnt form thick and did not cause any strong erosion in the creeks in my opinion. These pics are from the Humber River This right below is a partial Treptoceras crebiseptum I collected along the bank. Sorry for the blurry pic, this one is a Pholadomorpha pholadoformis.
  3. Here are some finds from a late August to early September long loop road trip, fossil hunting through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana and Kentucky. I'll appreciate detailed specimen identification help. First photo shows brachiopods & a trilobite from the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, northwestern Ohio.
  4. Unknown Gastropod

    I had to make a trip to the "big" city of Rochester, Mn today. As I drove by a new building site that exposed some Decorah Shale, I had to make a stop. The Decorah Shale is an impervious layer that keeps pollution from seeping into deeper rock layers and contaminating our ground water. Obviously, building permits are being obtained without adherence to the zoning which prevents interuption of this great geologic feature! I will drink my own water but collect fossils from these ill conceived sites. While visiting such a site, I discovered this tiny gastropod that I can not identify.
  5. Nautiloid

    Hello all, I don't know much about cephalopods and really could use your help. I found this small rock with the tiny nautiloid specimen in the banks of the Rock River in Ogle county, Illinois. The area's bedrock is Middle Ordovician (Mohawkian, Ancell Group). I believe it belongs to the order of the Actinoceridae. The "camerae" end in double pointed arches instead of a straight edge, just as Wikpedia's illustration shows in the 2nd pic below. What seems to be unusual in my specimen - can't find any photos of this anywhere - are the rounded camerae, vs the tightly lined-up straight banding on other specimens. (I'm not sure about the correct terminology...sorry). If I'm not totally off base, is there a chance to narrow down the ID further? Thanks in advance. General form of Actinocerid:
  6. I have found a couple of trilobites on a friend's property near Eganville, but I don't know what the attached fossils are. I am pretty sure the last one is a number of shells, but any ideas on the other ones? Thanks,
  7. Partial Trilobite Fossil Found

    Hi - this is my first post to this group. I found this partial trilobite fossil this past summer in Ordovician limestone near Eganville, Ontario, Canada and I am hoping that someone here can help me identify the trilobite species it belongs to. This piece measures 3.5 inches in length by a little over 2.5 inches wide and I believe it is the pygidium and most of the thorax (so a little more than half of the full trilobite). Also, it has a little over 1/2 inch in depth, so it is not completely crushed flat. I would have much rather found a full trilobite - and I do have a full trilobite that I found that I am having prepped, that I will post at a later date - but I am very happy with the size and condition of this sample. I broke it out of the rock in this condition - no prepping has been done to this sample. Any thoughts?
  8. I was recently reorganizing my fossil collection and thought I would share some pieces I collected during Paleontology field trips in undergrad at Alabama. I'm glad I took thorough notes at the time! The demopolis chalk is a popular formation for finding Exogyra/ostrea/pycnodonte shells and shark teeth. We visited a site in Tupelo, MS many times for surface collecting. Some of the cool pieces I found were many fragments of a mosasaur jaw (top pic, top 2 slots), a Squalicorax kaupi tooth, a scyliorhinus(?) tooth, bony fish vertebrae, and bony fish teeth. I was told the dark fossils at the right of the third picture might be ray plates, but I'm not sure. Turritella in pic 1 are from a different formation.
  9. NE Iowa Paleozoic

    I read a lot of fossil hunting reports on here, but I don’t post many. I think it’s primarily because it is usually many, many months after I have gone when I finally get everything cleaned up, ID’d and take photos, etc. It just seems too after the fact to me at that point, haha. But this time, due to a wonderful “tour guide” we had, I wanted to get something posted in a relatively timely fashion. Because of that, I haven’t had time to do a lot of research I need to do on specific ID’s but luckily I’m somewhat familiar with most of what we found to make at least an educated guess. I have seen numerous folks on here show some of their finds from the Ordovician and Devonian of Iowa and nearby states and it always looked intriguing to me as I have collected the Ordovician in the (relatively) nearby Cincinnati area and the Devonian in the Great Lakes area and Oklahoma. I wanted to see how the Iowa stuff compares. So my wife and I opted to take the long way home from Indiana to Texas and swing through Iowa (and on to South Dakota, but that was more for sight-seeing). I had done some research on sites to check out and contacted Mike @minnbuckeye to see if he could help me high grade my list. Being the absolute gentleman that he is, he did one better and offered to act as our tour guide for a day of collecting through the Ordovician! What a guy!! I can’t thank him enough for taking the time to do this. We had a great day and hit a bunch of nice spots, most of which I had not found on my own and certainly didn’t know some of the very important details of the sites. Many folks have said it in other trip reports and I can only add to the chorus of how valuable it is to go with someone that knows the area and how nice it is of TFF members such as @minnbuckeye to offer their time and energy to do it. Based on Mike’s recommendation, we spent our first day doing some collecting in the Devonian rocks of the Coralville, Iowa area. The first spot we could not access due to some current road construction but we made our way to the next one and spent several hours along the Iowa River/Coralville Lake collecting from the Coralville Formation of the Cedar Valley Group. You quickly learn how Coralville got its name as the rocks are a coral/bryozoan limestone. There are brachiopods and other fauna, but corals make up the bulk of the fossils at this site. And there were some very nice ones as you can see in the pictures below. Beautiful Hexagonaria, huge horn corals and others. We also went to the Devonian Fossil Gorge and a nearby state park, both of which have nice exposures of Devonian rocks with fossils, but no collecting. Here is a shot of the area, fossils litter the ground. This represents our total haul from this site The horn coral in here were abundant and quite large. Corals What I believe are Hexagoanaria corals. I think with a little cleaning, these will look really nice and I like the juxtaposition with the horn coral. Brachiopods and bryozoans A nice piece that was a little too big to take.
  10. van Keulen, P. and Rhebergen, F., 2017. Typology and fossil assemblage of Sandbian (Ordovician) 'baksteenkalk': an erratic silicified limestone of Baltic origin from the northeastern Netherlands and adjacent areas of Germany. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 66(4), pp.198-220. Link to open access PDF file Winterman, W., 1990. Baksteenkalk. Grondboor & Hamer, 44(1), pp.11-13. Rhebergen, F., 2001. Trilobieten in noordelijke zwerfstenen in Nederland. GEA, 34(3), pp.39-43. Rhebergen, F., 1993. Ordovicische zwerfstenen in het Twents-Duitse grensgebied. Grondboor en Hamer, 47, pp.132-140. Yours, Paul H.
  11. This is a specimen from the strata near the top of Fossil Mountain/ Ibex in Millard County, Utah, USA. ( Ordovician- Lehman Formation) This is as-found 17JUL19 , no prep was done as I thought the weathering was beautiful just the way it is! Lots of interesting stuff in there, bits of various trilos, bivalves, ostrocoda,and lots of those coiled and partially coiled critters I have yet to identify.
  12. Living at the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, we're used to spring floods. Last year, though, it was a whopper, second (barely) only to the Great Flood of 1993. It was months before the water receded, and when it did, I went up the River Road to Grafton IL to see what I could see. There's a little exposed ledge right at the edge of town, with towering bluffs across a grassy area behind it, and to my surprise this was lying on top of the ledge. It has a fossil-y look to it but I mainly collect Ordovician seabed things and I can't recall seeing anything that looked like this, or that had the size this thing has. I'm attaching a map showing exactly where I found it and what the strata in the area are, hope that helps, but honestly it looked like something that might have been carried down from some unknown place upstream by the flood, and just deposited where I found it. Thanks for any insights!
  13. Back to the Ohio Valley

    Hi Everyone, I took a 2 week trip to the Ohio Valley, arriving back in New York about a week ago. It was primarily a family visit since many of my relatives now reside in the Elizabethtown, KY area. However, the Ohio Valley, as some of you know, is very rich in Paleozoic fossils and I just had to make a few stops on my way there and back as well as between family engagements. I will try to share enough to give you all a gist of it: It was a long day's drive from the northern suburbs of New York City to Richmond, Indiana where I spent the first night. The next day I was headed down State Road 101 to Garr Hill, to collect in the Upper Ordovician Liberty Formation. It was my first time at the site and everything I found was collected from loose rocks at or near the base of the outcrop. A couple of pictures:
  14. A Week in Quebec

    I'm just easing back to regular life after a week of fossil collecting in the province of Quebec. We had a fantastic and highly productive time. There are a number of sites that I cannot mention publicly, and also some excellent specimens that I am sworn not to post anywhere, but I can show a few things. I haven't photographed everything yet, either. We collected mostly in the Neuville and Nicolet Formations. The first stop was Kingston, Ontario where we met up with a fellow fossil friend for a brief time. I obtained my own physical copy of Isotalo's book. I then meandered to a rock pile and spotted what would be the first of many trilobites on this trip, a battered Raymondites superbus in the Gull River Formation.
  15. Hey guys, Saw this very nice looking trilobite for sale at a reasonable price, so I’m thinking of buying it. However I’m curious to know whether or not the specimen may be fake/retouched/in any way artificially handled. What do you guys think? Thanks in advance! Max Declivolithus Trilobite Ordovician Period Alnif, Morocco
  16. Im new and need a bunch of help

    Im new have found abunch of bone. Not shur what turns dynos to gems but i have teeth skin and whole specimens in sap i think. I need alot of help
  17. VA Fossil Collecting Jackpot!

    Last week me and some friends went to a couple of localities in Virginia! It was a nice change from collecting in the heat. Came back with boxes of Ordovician-age fossils on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday then went to good 'ol Purse for shark teeth the rest of the week and weekend. Came back with quite a few well-preserved brachiopods, graptolites, and a few fragments of trilobites. So many ray plates and a few shark teeth from Purse. I'm backlogged for weeks! Too tired to bother writing properly.
  18. Harding sandstone question

    Hi guys, I recently purchased some processed Harding sandstone, I was looking for unprocessed stuff but I could not find any for sale so I had to just go with this. The fossils arrived today and I have been examining them with my microscope, I find this stuff very fascinating. My question is regarding these fossils here: the ID guide that came with them claims they are sharks but I find this strange, I believe chondrichthyes only appeared in the Late Silurian so how could this be? Are they something else, and if so do we know what that something would be? Also if they are sharks would we not also expect to find their teeth, yet they seem absent in this matrix. Thank you, Misha
  19. I was on vacation this week and had to do a little remodel in our half bathroom, but I did make enough time to make a 5 hour trip to Kentucky and Indiana for some road cut collecting. My first stop was in Wilder, Kentucky, I love this first stop because I always find some story book hash plates. I have to admit that hash plates that have a lot of things going on are some of my favorite fossils to find. A lot of the pieces shown in this post ended up in the buckets of fossils that I brought to the ESCONI Braceville Shaft Mine trip on Saturday. Here are a couple pics of this location. One thing that I have to say about this location is that I do not find a lot of loose fossils here. I do not know if it is just me or that I am just gravitate to the hash plates that I find here. This is the only location that I find Graptolites, here are some pics. I picked up this piece because it reminded me of a Cruziana, I have some in my collection, but I have never actually found one. What do you think? Here are some burrow traces, they are all over the place. Here is another trace fossil, I forget the name of these. I did pick up a couple pieces that had long crinoid stems. Bryozoan are found here as well as pieces of Straight shelled nautiloids. Another thing that is special about this site is are the Cryptolithus trilo-bits that I find. I find these trilobites very pretty and love the lace collar and I don't recall if I ever found them at other locations. Here are some hash plates with them as well as Flexicalymene trilo-bits and other things. CONTINUED ON NEXT POST
  20. Crinoid (?) Fossil ID Needed

    Found this the other day in Eastern Ontario and I'm not quite sure what it is. I asked on reddit and someone suggested it could possibly be a crinoid holdfast, but I wanted to get a second opinion just to be sure. Ordovician, about 2.5cm in diameter.
  21. Local Ordovician Trip

    It has been 7 years now since I became hooked on the "fossil thing". My hunts seem to creep a little further from home with each passing year. Greener pasture syndrome. So a few days ago, I purposely started my adventure close to home. Here are a few finds from the Ordovician. @ClearLake Let me start with a few unknowns: This last one could just be a squished brachiopod, but seems to be a coiled organism. IDed as Trilobite eye, probably Isotelus The pygidium pictured came from a new spot I tried, expecting to find Isotelus. The pygidiums look more like Bumastus???? Actually IDed as Homotelus(?) florencevillensis. Again, not Bumastus, but Homotelus(?) florencevillensis. The trilobites came from the Maquoketa, the others from the Galena. I collected a few brachiopods (Galena) to please @Tidgy's Dad The Galena locally has many gastropods.
  22. Cryptolithus cephalon

    From the album Fossils of the Upper Ordovician Lorraine Group in New York

    Cryptolithus lorrainensis Upper Ordovician Lorraine Group Whetstone Gulf Formation Jefferson County, New York Collected 11/11/19
  23. Flexicalymene free cheek

    From the album Fossils of the Upper Ordovician Lorraine Group in New York

    Flexicalymene granulosa? Upper Ordovician Lorraine Group Whetstone Gulf Formation Jefferson County, New York Collected 11/11/19
  24. Detailed Cryptolithus cephalon

    From the album Fossils of the Upper Ordovician Lorraine Group in New York

    Cryptolithus lorrainensis Upper Ordovician Lorraine Group Whetstone Gulf Formation Jefferson County, New York Collected 11/11/19
×