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Found 515 results

  1. a) Agerina ? If yes, whats the Fezouata species?
  2. Bryozoan ID

    I am wondering if someone can identify this Bryozoan that I found at the road cut in St. Leon, Indiana- I have not found a another one like it. @Peat Burns / @Herb possibly you could help.
  3. Partial Trilobites to ID Please

    Just putting away my trilobite finds for the winter and decided to try to place a name with a face to a few, well a dozen , of my unknowns. Most of these were found in SW Wisconsin in the Mifflin of the Platteville Formation, Ordovician. It seems very difficult to ID trilobites when they present themselves as partials. These are not beautiful specimens, but knowing their ID can help me with future hunts. Thanks for any help. 1. Are these Thaleops or Illaenus cephalons? I can not figure out how to differentiate. 2. Is this a pygidium? If so, it is quite large. Any thoughts on how to label this? 3. What is the ID for the two partial cephalons with what looks like an eye on each one? 4. Is this a hypostome from Basiliella barrandi? 5. Can't place these pygidiums . Kinda isotoleus but kind of bumastus. Actually I have no idea!!! These actually came from the Maquoketa, not Platteville.
  4. Hello, I want to put together some pics of some of the reef material that I have found in Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario on the banks of the Credit River. It is now winter and I am missing the warm days in which I can go and wade in the warm waters of the river for fun. I just want to compile and share some specimens that whose photos I have not shared with. All the fossils belong to the Georgian Bay formation, Upper Member, which is late Ordovician in age. First is the common coral that displays an enormity of growth forms, Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826).
  5. I'm curious how one can determine whether a cephalopod fossil is an adult or juvenile? I seem to recall hearing from somewhere that if there is a double suture line in the middle of the phragmocone indicates it is an adult. Here are three Beloitoceras specimens I found at different localities. The specimen in the middle has double suture rings. Thanks for any insight.
  6. Brechin Ontario 12/2/2017

    Here are my finds from the Verulam fm in Brechin Ontario. I had never been to an active quarry before so it was cool to see some of the machinery in addition to the unending supply of rocks to split. The temperature was amazing for December and we didn't get any rain. The very bottom of the quarry exposes the Bobcaygeon fm but it was flooded this time. @Malcolmt thanks for taking me to your spot! I remember what you said most of these are but will need reminding on a couple... 1. Pleurocystite - sadly missing the stalk and one of the arms but great to find one (Didn't know they existed until Saturday) A few of the plates fell off so I got a better look at the structure underneath before gluing it back together 2. Ceraurus trilobites 3. Isotelus trilobite 4. (forgot the name) partial trilobite Needs some cleaning but I'm afraid to damage it 5. Crinoid calyx (forgot the name) 6. Unknown cephalopod
  7. Disorganized chaos

    Well I got a new phone (Samsung Galaxy Note 8) on Black Friday and was playing with it snapping some pictures. Those of you that have been to my house know that I am totally disorganized and definitely need to organize my fossils. Thought I would share some of the disorganized chaos that is my basement fossil dumping area. This tends to be where fossils go to rest if they do not make it to the glass display cases (3) upstairs where I put the good stuff. But then that is a step up from the ones that never get out of the map drawers and boxes in the garage. One of these days I will get around to organizing things, just never happens to be today....... I suspect my kids will end up having to organize it someday......... (That's a scary thought)
  8. Sliced and polished nautiloids

    More from the Etobicoke creek in Mississauga. Ive been slicing and polishing some worn down nautiloid fragments and they look pretty cool.
  9. Well the realm of my future fossils is just as chaotic. I suspect I have years worth of unprepped material here. Need to get my moving ...... I also have a garage full and several shelving units in another room As you can see they don't look that spectacular prior to getting some love and care.
  10. Kane, Debbie and Shamalama

    Just recently finished doing these for a few Fossil Forum members (Kane and Shamalama) Likely wont be seeing them for a bit so I thought they would like to see their bugs and knew neither would mind me posting them. None were pristine but a little prep helped.... First are a pair that belong to Kane and Debbie The second belongs to Shamalama
  11. Hello, bug lovers! I found some pretty cool trilobites this last Sunday at my favorite road cut in Wisconsin. Since I'm a bit of a noob with bugs I'd appreicate some help on IDs and a confirmation on the formation. I think this is the Platteville formation. But it could be Decorah.....? @piranha Sorry for the pics in advance. Lol Found as is. After a bit of prep. Gabriceraurus mifflinensis? Ceraurinella scofieldi (possibly more thorax)? Continued..........
  12. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Platystrophia ponderosa Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Platystrophia is an extinct genus of brachiopods that lived from the Ordovician to the Silurian in Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. It has a prominent sulcus and fold. It usually lived in marine lime mud and sands. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" (shells) on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Brachiopod valves are hinged at the rear end, while the front can be opened for feeding or closed for protection. Two major groups are recognized, articulate and inarticulate. The word "articulate" is used to describe the tooth-and-groove features of the valve-hinge which is present in the articulate group, and absent from the inarticulate group. This is the leading diagnostic feature (fossilizable), by which the two main groups can be readily distinguished. Articulate brachiopods have toothed hinges and simple opening and closing muscles, while inarticulate brachiopods have untoothed hinges and a more complex system of muscles used to keep the two halves aligned. In a typical brachiopod a stalk-like pedicle projects from an opening in one of the valves near the hinges, known as the pedicle valve, keeping the animal anchored to the seabed but clear of silt that would obstruct the opening. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Platystrophia Species: †ponderosa
  13. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Platystrophia ponderosa Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Platystrophia is an extinct genus of brachiopods that lived from the Ordovician to the Silurian in Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. It has a prominent sulcus and fold. It usually lived in marine lime mud and sands. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" (shells) on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Brachiopod valves are hinged at the rear end, while the front can be opened for feeding or closed for protection. Two major groups are recognized, articulate and inarticulate. The word "articulate" is used to describe the tooth-and-groove features of the valve-hinge which is present in the articulate group, and absent from the inarticulate group. This is the leading diagnostic feature (fossilizable), by which the two main groups can be readily distinguished. Articulate brachiopods have toothed hinges and simple opening and closing muscles, while inarticulate brachiopods have untoothed hinges and a more complex system of muscles used to keep the two halves aligned. In a typical brachiopod a stalk-like pedicle projects from an opening in one of the valves near the hinges, known as the pedicle valve, keeping the animal anchored to the seabed but clear of silt that would obstruct the opening. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Platystrophia Species: †ponderosa
  14. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Platystrophia ponderosa Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Platystrophia is an extinct genus of brachiopods that lived from the Ordovician to the Silurian in Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. It has a prominent sulcus and fold. It usually lived in marine lime mud and sands. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" (shells) on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Brachiopod valves are hinged at the rear end, while the front can be opened for feeding or closed for protection. Two major groups are recognized, articulate and inarticulate. The word "articulate" is used to describe the tooth-and-groove features of the valve-hinge which is present in the articulate group, and absent from the inarticulate group. This is the leading diagnostic feature (fossilizable), by which the two main groups can be readily distinguished. Articulate brachiopods have toothed hinges and simple opening and closing muscles, while inarticulate brachiopods have untoothed hinges and a more complex system of muscles used to keep the two halves aligned. In a typical brachiopod a stalk-like pedicle projects from an opening in one of the valves near the hinges, known as the pedicle valve, keeping the animal anchored to the seabed but clear of silt that would obstruct the opening. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Platystrophia Species: †ponderosa
  15. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  16. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  17. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hebertella occidentalis Brachiopod Trimble County, Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Moderate to large Hebertella species with a subquadrate outline and a moderate to highly pronounced sulcus. Shell wider than long; shell depth variable, convexoconcave to unequally biconvex; cardinal extremities angular; sulcus wide with moderate to very high depth, typically well developed in larger specimins; ventral muscle scars of variable width; dorsal and ventral umbonal angles low (<135 degrees). Articulate brachiopod. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Orthida Family: †Plectorthidae Genus: †Herbertella Species: †occidentalis
  18. Calymente tristani Trilobite.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calymene tristani Trilobite Jebel Issoumour, Alnif, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Age (444-486 Million Years Ago) Calymene (meaning beautiful crescent as a reference to the glabella) is a genus of trilobites in the order Phacopida that are found throughout North America, North Africa, and Europe in primarily Silurian outcrops. Calymene is closely related to Flexicalymene, and both genera are frequently found inrolled. Calymene trilobites are small, typically 2 cm in length. Their cephalon is the widest part of the animal, and the thorax is usually in 13 segments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Calymenidae Genus: †Calymene Species: †tristani
  19. Fossil???

    Hi all, I'm new to the forum. I was wondering if I could get some help identifying the material in the picture. It was found on a shale / glacial till beach in southern Ontario. The material is very light in weight and looks to have shell fragment inbeded. Thanks for looking.
  20. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
  21. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
  22. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
  24. Lake Ontario finds, Whitby ON

    Some recent finds from Lake Ontario, East of Toronto. Unknown Graptolites Lots of fragments Bivalve
  25. Etobicoke creek finds

    Here are a few pieces I've found in the Etobicoke creek, Mississauga, Ontario. Nautiloids Crinoid fragments Unknown Unknown
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