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Found 43 results

  1. Otodus? Purse State Park Maryland

    Hello all, Braved what seems to be one of the colder and windier days within the last two weeks but I think I might have found my first Otodus! This is from the Aquia formation of the Potomac River, it's a little worn and not in the best of shape but if it's a first I'll take it: Also found this little guy and was thinking Cretolamna sp. but wanted to be certain as I'm just a novice: Thanks for any and all help! This forum has definitely helped me tons and I've chatted with quite a few members shared some wonderful advice and made it even harder to think about anything else except for hunting! Recently was able to find my first Meg(s) and now hopefully and Otodus! Everything is starting to fall into place and I'm really excited for summer to roll around so I can put my kayak to good use!
  2. These were the pick of the bunch of teeth we found amongst the shingle. The three on the left are the best of what my wife found. “Minilodon” on the right was the sum total of my efforts! Beautiful weather, and lovely beaches. Perfect weekend fossicking.
  3. I was able to head to the Paleocene area of the Potomac for a few of hours today, glad I did. I was heading to work, I was quite shocked to see the water was already extremely low even though low tide was supposed to be 6 hours later, I confirmed the tides when I got to work...a strong west wind had pushed the water out and I was set to have some prime time beach time with extra low tides. By the time I was able to slip out of work, I made it to the river about 2 hours before low tide...the water was already lower than I had ever seen it before; this is when I realized that I had too much of a good thing! I kept zigzagging back and forth between the waterline and the old waterline. I finally gave up the zigzag approach and decided to walk the waterline going and the old waterline coming back. The finds were less than what I was expecting but I'm not complaining either, I wish I cold have spent a few more hours out there. My trip maker was my second ever Paleocarcharodon orientalis, worn and much smaller than my first one, I almost discounted it when I originally spied it because I thought it was a broken tooth. A little voice inside my head told me to check it out and I was pleasantly surprised when I picked it up. Total haul. Paleocarcharodon orientalis and Otodus obliquus Close up of the Paleocarcharodon orientalis
  4. Hello all, I stop collecting shark teeth from the cenozoic. I offer all my shark teeth for trade here. There are 3 different location. -Antwerpen, Schelde. Collected in 1970 (not by me) -Balegem. Collected in 1986 (not by me) -Steendorp. Date not known. There is one Megalodon (Steendorp). It's about 8 cm and has all serrations. There is some damage at one side. Steendorp is a closed location were fossils from the Neogene were found. Next there is about 4,5 pound of Balegem shark and ray teeth. These were collected in 1986. There are a couple of Otodus teeth (at least 3 complete), I heard these are pretty rare, but most are from Striatolamia macrota. The biggest one is over 2 inch. This is also a closed location where fossils from the Lutetian (middle eocene) were found. Many complete teeth altough there are also broken teeth in it. No junk. The last location (Antwerp) includes about 1,1 pound of teeth that were found in the Schelde in 1970. Most teeth are broken but there are some nice small ones in it (Notorynchus, Hastalis...). (No pictures yet). At last I will throw in some teeth from Cadzand/Breskens (The Netherlands). There are waaay to many teeth to take pictures of every single one of them, so I just took some pictures of some. If interested, Pm me and I will send you more pictures. I know the pictures aren't the best, but I don't have a camera and my smartphone don't want to cooperate with me. I'm looking for: -Fish -Anything insect -Anything dinosaur (no chunkosaur) - Fossils from Liaoning or similar locations in China - Trilobites - Permian/ Triassic reptiles (teeth,jaws, bones etc.) - Anything I don't have from the KemKem Beds. -All shark teeth that are at least as old as the Cretaceous. - Fossils from the Eocene of Morocco. - ...
  5. Otodus obliquus (Agassiz 1843)

    From the album Pisces

    3cm. Eocene. From the Phosphate Beds at Qued Zem, Khouribga, Morocco.
  6. Purse State Park // 2/18

    Had a busy weekend after visiting Brownies Beach on Saturday 2/17 and then back on the beach at Purse SP on Sunday 2/18. Nothing spectacular from this trip, but was able to find a decent Otodus kicking in the wash which is always a good day for me. While sitting on a chunk of cliff-fall as I was eating lunch I found 5 teeth sticking out of the matrix and they were SHARP! I need help to ID the blade I found. It was sticking out of the formation and is fossilized. I don't believe it is from a shark due to the symmetry, but it looks like it may be some sort of fish tooth of sawfish rostrum. Lots of broken sandtigers to be found and the bald eagles were enjoying the warm weather. Once the wind died down it was beautiful outside and the beach was packed with visitors as my friend and I left with our bags of goodies. u ID? love how perfect the cusps are on this micro
  7. Here are some micro finds from a recent trip to a Paleocene site on the Potomac river. The drum tooth is the first drum tooth I have found and it was my second find of the day!
  8. Handful of Otodus/Croc

    Here's a handful of Otudus, Crocodile, and Sand Tigers from a recent trip to Purse State Park
  9. So I decided to venture outside of my comfort zone of Calvert Cliffs and head over to the Potomac at Purse State park. Low tide was right around 5pm so i decided to head over around 1 and walk for a while. I figured that since I was going late in the day that I would have lots of company on the beach. Well I was wrong on on having company on the beach and on the amount of time I would need to preform a good search. I got to the parking lot and empty I quickly got on my gear and made the mile hike down to the beach. I was very happy to see that there were no footprints anywhere the water was low and super calm. I decided to head to the north first and was very happy to find 2 crocodile teeth because not many are found at my normal stomping grounds. I then decided to fill up a bag of shells for mom because she loves shells and there was an abundance at this beach. I then turned my attention to the south and was rewarded with a pristine otodus and a nice paraorthacodus clarkii a nice cretolamna and some other fantastic teeth my knowledge of the paleocene is not as it is on the miocene. Well i walked all the way to the point when i noticed the sun starting to disappear and realized i still had a 1/2 mile walk back to the trail and another mile back to my truck. I could have spent another 4 hours searching well i will know better for next time. I have also included my past couple of trips along the cliffs my best finds from over there were a couple of stunning ecphoras, a few megalodons, and a hadrodelphis that is my first all in all february has been treating me very well.
  10. I'm looking for a nice Otodus tooth on matrix. This one is described as "still embedded in the natural rock it was found in." It is 2.5". Does this look naturally attached or glued on to you all? Thank you.
  11. Help needed to identify these shark teeth. Responses are appreciated. Thx.
  12. Help needed to identify these fossils

    Help needed to identify these ammonites and shark teeth. Thanks.
  13. Hello all! I'm wondering, if there are any fossil sites in the UK with fossil shark teeth. I know in UK there are tons of places with ammonites, but what about shark teeth? As long as it's shark teeth, I want to find it. But if there's megalodon teeth in UK, I'd spend days looking for one. Any ideas where to find shark teeth in UK? Thanks for all replies!
  14. Purse State Park 12/22/17

    There are so many testaments to Purse State Park being a fantastic fossil collecting site online, and because of this I thought I’d go there myself and test my luck. I kept on hearing about quantity, and how Purse yields more fossil sharks teeth per trip than just about any other local site. I was blown away when reading that people come home from a single trip with hundreds of teeth, and of decent size and quality too! And so a few days before Christmas, I packed up my gear and made my way across the border and down the Potomac to Purse State Park.The drive there was just fine, and the park is very secluded, unlike some other common sites. Perhaps its isolation contributes to its lack of a crowd in comparison to the Calvert Cliffs. The park is quite difficult to find as it is not clearly marked; I actually drove past it at first and had to turn around! The parking lot is on the left side of the road, and you have to cross the road to get to the trail. The hike is a little under a mile, which can be a pain if you have a lot of gear. It’s also practically in the middle of nowhere, so be cautious. Eventually, you’ll find yourself on a very nice little beach along the Potomac River. The cliffs run along the majority of the beach, and you can even see the exposed shells and cliff mix in the lower layers of some parts. In terms of area, this site is astonishing! There is at the very least a mile of beach, not to mention the fact that you can venture far past that thanks to the high tide line law in Maryland. You really could just keep walking, and I did just that, but even then I couldn’t cover all of the area even in the eight or nine hours that I hunted. If your looking for a place to hunt where there’s more beach than you know what to do with, head down to Purse.The fossils found here are from the Paleocene Era, much older than the Miocene exposures at the Calvert Cliffs. They are approximately 60 million years old, which is nearly dinosaur aged! One area where Purse does lack, however, is variety. Although you may find loads of teeth, they will all likely belong to only a handful of species unlike the Calvert Cliffs that yield hundreds of different species. This being said, the species found at Purse State Park are fascinating. The majority of teeth found will be those of extinct Sand Tiger Sharks, although you are able to find ray plates and mackerel shark teeth as well. Maybe you'll even be lucky enough to uncover a dreaded Otodus!I got to the park just a few minutes after sunrise, making for a beautiful sight. Once I began searching, I quickly learned that my shovel and sifter were rendered near useless, as I was finding teeth left and right by simply using my eyes. Surface hunting allowed me to cover a lot more distance in a lot shorter time, and I also began developing an eye for sharks teeth; there were a few time I spotted a nice tooth with only the root showing in the gravel or sand! The air temperature was not too bad, but the water was absolutely frigid and I had to take multiple breaks to avoid losing feeling in my hands completely. I tried to cover as much beach as possible without going too fast and missing teeth, and I was quite successful in doing so. To the left of the entrance, I walked for at least a mile finding tons of teeth, and I eventually stumbled upon a large and complete Turritella mold! I had found tiny fragments towards the entrance, but I was ecstatic with this find. But then, I found another. And another. When I looked up I realized I was standing right by a multitude of cliff falls that were full of these Gastropod fossils! There were hundreds of them, both in the rocks and freshly washed into the surf beneath them. I picked up the prettiest ones I could find, even carefully prying one out of the matrix. As sunset approached, I had found hundreds of fossils including teeth, plates, molds, and possible bones (turned out to be pseudofossils). But aside from some good sized sand tigers, I didn’t have anything too spectacular. But in the last hour of searching, I turned over an object that was mostly buried in the sand. To my delight, it was a nearly complete Otodus tooth! My first relatively large tooth, and a great way to end a great day of hunting! Otodus obliquus was a giant shark, nearly 35 feet in length, that was likely the ancestor to megatooth sharks like Megalodon. And since Megalodon was not alive during the Paleocene, I’d argue that finding a tooth from its great great Grandpa is just as cool! And with that, I found another handful or two of teeth on the way back to my bag and began to leave as the sun set over the horizon. On the way out, I got to share my finds with a family who was walking their dog along the beach. They were the only other people I saw in the park all day long; other than that I had the site to myself. I said a big thank you to Purse State Park, and hit the road.In total, I found an incredible 619 sharks teeth, along with over 50 other fossils! Like I said, this site delivers when it comes to quantity. Some of my favorite finds are the large Otodus in the middle, the Turritella, and the long and complete Sand Tigers. I was only able to display so many teeth before my space was overcrowded, and I had to put the rest in a pile. I am beyond happy with the results from this trip; it was by far my most productive trip yet. I hope you all enjoy seeing my finds and hearing my report, and I hope you’ll pay a visit to Purse! As always, Hoppe Hunting!
  15. Is this an otodus or auriculatus tooth ?

    Hello everyone ! I was wondering if anyone can tell me if this is an otodus or auriculatus tooth ? I have the impression that there are some tiny serrations on the edge of the tooth, but they are so small that I am really unsure. Also can anyone tell me if it comes from a juvenile or adult specimen ? Thank you very much in advance !
  16. So, I have acquired a specimen of every species from cretolamna to C. megalodon. Now I just need to get better representatives, or ones that fit the bill better (posteriors, around 2 inches, and curved to the right). The last specimen is coming in the mail later this month (a auriculatus). I need to find a new otodus, a larger angy, a complete meg, and maybe an aksauticus that curves right. Here’s the set without auriculatus, I’ll update this thread with it once it comes. I’ll have to get working on the GW shark line next, that one will be MUCH harder...
  17. Walton on the Naze finds

    HI everyone here are the best of my finds, found at Walton on the Naze over the past year. The big tooth on left corner I believe is an Otodus that was given to me by another fossil hunting enthusiast. Sadly didn't find it myself but it is still nice to have as a memento of Walton .
  18. Caledon State Park fossils

    I thought I would share some photos of fossils and an arrowhead I found over the last few years from Caledon State Park in King George County, Va. I know of no other posts anywhere discussing fossils located at this site in Va., although, the fossils at this location along the Potomac River are not very abundant. Sometimes I go down there (1.9 mile hike on a dirt road to the beach) and find nothing. More typically, if you search for 2 hours along the beach there, you will typically find a few small shark teeth; on a good day maybe 10 teeth. Every now and then, one may find a small bone fragment and every once in a while an arrowhead (I’ve only found maybe 2-3 arrowheads here). The fossils are Paleocene in age (66 to 56 million years ago). My best finds are a few Otodus sharks teeth shown in the photos. I might mention that I went to this park probably 25 times before I found even 1 Otodus tooth, so these are very rare at this location.
  19. Hi all, Out walking today with my wife at Walton on the Naze beach, I stumbled upon my second Otodus tooth in the space of a month. This has to be my best specimen yet and I'm really 'chuffed'! This would have come from the London Clay deposits c53mya I was wondering if it was possible to determine anything about the animal from the one tooth alone, or where in the mouth the the tooth might have come from as it seems much straighter than all the other specimens we have found. Any help would be great. Best wishes, Carl
  20. Hi all, Spent the weekend at Walton on the Naze, Essex, dodging the rain. We only had about 15 minutes on Sunday (slept through the alarm!) before the high tide would have cut off access to the beach, however we took advantage and found a few striatolamia teeth in the shingle. Once we had decided to give up I stumbled across this beauty in the sand. I'm assuming its an Otodus obliquus tooth but any other suggestions would be gratefully received. Love the colour of this specimen. Happy hunting!
  21. Purse-5/8/17

    Went out to Purse the other day with my girlfriend, its been way too long since I last got out. Tides and water level have not been good lately. I just bought my girlfriend a new pair of hip boots and she's been itching to use them. 80 bucks at Cabela's which i didnt think was too bad at all. It was a beautiful day and the tide was surprisingly low with a good bit of wave action. Found some cool stuff including what looks a like a goblin tooth to me with a elongated root. Boneheadz
  22. H, The family and I spent a lovely week at Walton on the Naze in Essex, UK. As it was the Easter break the site was very busy with collectors young and old, but we still managed to find some interesting pieces. The site itself is London Clay (c53my) with a junction bed above from which whale bone and Megalodon teeth can be found. Above this is the distinctive Red Crag (c.2my). Lastly are glacial deposits and later from which Neolithic and Roman finds have been found over the years. The site is rapidly eroding at a rate of about a metre a year however there are daily land slips and falls so whether that rate is accelerating its hard to say. Most of the finds are in the shingle and with my eyes I had to adopt the 'hands and knees crawl' technique to see anything other than a blur of shapes. All of the finds below (with the exception of the potential neolithic finds) are from the London Clay sediments. The Site: We found a lot of striatolamia shark teeth. Its possible there are other species within this, however we haven't had time to have a detailed look at each tooth yet: Two nice Otodus shark teeth were found by my wife: A pair of what we believe are well worn ray dentition plates. They were hard to photograph so apologies for the lack of clarity: On a previous trip a few weeks ago we also found this. Both turtle and bird bone have been found on this site. Could this be either?: I've included a fossilised twig and a seed that I picked up. The beach is littered with these and tend to be ignored by the fossil hunters as they are so common. I like them: Lastly I've included two interesting finds. The ball is from Walton and the 'spear point' was from Dovercourt just up the coast. In an archaeological context these might be exciting finds - the ball is similar to others that have been described as hammer stones, gaming pieces or sling shots. The 'spear point' shows signs of rework along both edges. Out of context, within the beach shingle, they are just interesting stones but I thought I'd share them anyway: Any comments would be appreciated. Happy Hunting! Carl
  23. Can you identify this shark tooth?

    Hello TTF members! I have recently purchased a supposed "baby megladon" tooth at a pawn shop but I know it was an all-out scam for tourists. The reason I bought the tooth was because of its sheer size compared to the other shark teeth there, and because sadly it was the only real one I could identify. I'm guessing it came from a shark in the Otodus (Am I saying that right?) genus. I also purchased a few other teeth, but I don't feel any need to identify them because they are all mixed fragments.
  24. While browsing ... Pulled from an online site and removed from their original context to protect the innocent. It was mentioned in the description that they may have been broken and 'cemented' back together. Hunh ... ya think ? Mary Shelley would be proud though.
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