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Found 40 results

  1. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni.
  2. Triarthrus eatoni

    Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni. Found in association with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, and Graptolites. The Cephalon is slightly disarticulated, likely from molting.
  3. Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside three other T. eatoni and one T. rougensis. Both eyes are preserved.
  4. Ottawa Marine Fossils

    Hey folks! It took some time but I've finally gotten around to uploading some pictures from my recent fossil ""hunt"! The quotations are there because the directions I left for myself from a prior trip included such extremely helpful tips as "left at the spooky demon tree". Turns out when you're a chicken a lot of trees look like spooky demons >.> It was definitely more of a sad confused wander than a full on hunt...but I digress. While I wasn't able to find the exact spot from before, I found an area with similar geological features, and after digging up about half a foot of loam around a small outcropping was rewarded with numerous individual rocks with all sorts of...things...all over them. I grabbed one giant 40lb chunk and a smaller one to play with and poke at to practice techniques. The smaller piece is on the bottom. Both samples were taken within feet of each other in a public forest just outside Ottawa, Ontario. The smaller piece I put in a bowl of water and gave a good scrub down with a toothbrush (brings me back to my field school days >.>) The surface and reverse of both are shown and I can provide more detailed pictures if necessary! I thought the crystallized shell things were pretty cool, there were quite a few more out there, but I'm completely unsure of what I'm looking at or if there was a way to extract them safely. I'm most curious as to what the circular things that litter the rocks are, but there seems to be a variety of other shells and tubey wormy things in there as well. Is there some sort of resource or database I could refer to for fossils from this particular time period/area? I'd feel bad constantly asking 'whats that!?" Anything neat here worth poking at with some of my archaeological pokers or have I found myself some very interesting garden rocks!
  5. Triarthrus rougensis

    Both genal spines are present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized. Found associated with T. spinosus, T. eatoni, cephalopods, and graptolites.
  6. Triarthrus spinosus

    Ventrally preserved. Both genal spines and one thoracic spine are present. Hyostome slightly visible. Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods and graptolites.
  7. Triarthrus spinosus

    Found associated with T. eatoni, T. rougensis, cephalopods, and graptolites. Impression of right genal spine is present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized.
  8. Good afternoon Paleontology afficiandos! A long time ago my friends and I were hanging out in an old open pit quarry in Nepean, Ontario, Canada (South Ottawa) and I found this little fossil. The quarry was quite deep, about 10-15 meters, so its difficult to put a depth for the find, especially since it came from a rock pile near the upper rim. Originally this find had been sitting flat on a much larger piece of rock however there were no other visible fossils on the surface layer. When I pointed this out to my friends, they 'hilariously' decided it should be pushed over the edge to explode on the quarry floor below -.- Luckily I was able to pick through the chunks and find it eventually, unscathed. What is shown in the picture is everything that was found in situ on the original rock. I then brought it home and promptly forgot about it for several years. I unearthed it again while doing a thorough house cleaning and figured I should ask the experts!
  9. A Fossilized Thing

    Hi again! I’m totally stumped with this one. The rock is limestone, so its not the Billings formation. There is still some matrix on it, but most of the surface is exposed. It’s spherical and slightly faceted. Fossil pearl?
  10. mystery fossil

    Found this at hogs back falls in Ottawa lodged under a very big rock not buried , I’m thinking lodged there during the very high waters in spring that’s why it looks so clean, it looks like a crab sitting an a pc of wood imo. Any knowledge would be greatly appreciated and any further cleaning duties you could suggest please let me know
  11. Crustacean fossils found in childhood

    Here are 3 crustacean fossils I found when I was younger and held onto them because I thought they were the coolest things ever. They were all found in the Ottawa area. There is also one other fossil which I’m not positive what it is. It sort of looks like a tony bone or a bit of coral. Helping to ID these would be so cool if possible!
  12. Triarthrus finds

    Hello again! This post will be about some beautifully preserved Triarthrus fossils (and my first complete Trilobite finds). Some of them even have the eyes preserved! I found these at a local train station, and the site of significant construction lately. I believe most of the to be E. eotoni, and the last one to be E. rougensis or spinosus. It may not be visible in the picture, but the last one has a streak of pyrite along the side of its cephalon / upper thorax. Could this be some kind of soft body tissue preservation, similar to those of the Beecher's Trilobite bed?
  13. Fossil ID

    This may or may not actually be a fossil. It is a cylindrical, shimmering white streak on the Shale. It is only about an inch long. This may just be another mineral inclusion, or some discoloured sediment. Any help with identifying this would be appreciated!
  14. Splitting Nodules And Concretions

    Hello TFF members! I have just found several strange circular rocks on a fossil hunt a few minutes ago, which I believe to be either nodules or concretions. What should I do to split these rocks? I know that I should probably not try to break them with a hammer and chisel, and instead use the freeze-thaw process. This is my first experience with nodules or concretions, so I am not very knowledgeable on this topic. Is there a specific recommended length of time I should leave them in the cold? How long should I thaw them for? How many times should I put them through the process before seeing cracks? How cold should the environment be for the freezing to work? If they are in fact nodules or concretions, I will post pictures of my finds (or lack thereof)!
  15. Agnostid?

    I found this fossil a few days ago at an exposure of the Billings Shale. It was found associated with Triarthrus glabellas and brachiopods. It's structure leads me to believe that it's either an Isotelus pygidium or an agnostid, although I do not know of any agnostics described in this formation and age.
  16. Anthology Of Unidentified Fossils

    Hi again! This will probably be my last ID post for a while. This time, I've decided to put all of the Unidentified fossils in one post. These are all from the Ordovician aged Billings Shale. Help identifying these will be much appreciated! 1. Leaf-shaped imprint. Mineral inclusion? 2. Trilobite fragment? 3. Dark markings and furrows. Burrows?
  17. Hello TTF! This post will contain the pictures of my science fair board, as well as the awards I received from it. Sorry for the delay, I know that some members posted requests for these months ago, but I have been busy with other things lately. I actually left part of the board at school by accident for weeks. I hope the pictures are clear enough!
  18. Repairing Fossils In Shale

    Recently, I have been out fossil hunting more often than usual, and many of them have since been damaged. Some were broken during transportation, and others were broken as I excavated them. The fossils are all from the black Billings Shale, which fractures easily. Is there any way that I can repair them without leaving any obvious markings?
  19. Triarthrus?

    Hi TFF! I have just found a very interesting fossil near my home which I suspect might be the articulated left and right pleura of a Triarthrus. I have already found other fragments of Triarthrus in the same rock outcrop. (Glabellas, pleura, cephalons, etc.) It may also be a graptolite or something similar.
  20. Orthocone or Hyolithid?

    Another fossil for ID! This time, I think that I have some possible orthocone nautiloids from the Billings Shale. I found these near a small construction site near my house. Although I suspect them to be cephalopods, they may also be Hylothids. Or, they could be something else entirely! I am not an expert on these faunas at the moment, so I may be wrong. Each photo is of a different specimen. Thanks in advance! More posts about the regional science fair are to follow.
  21. Dear TFF members, As some of you may already know, I have been working on my science fair project concerning the Trilobite Pseudogygites latimarginatus for several months. This science fair project has been awarded a position in the Ottawa Regional Science Fair held at Carleton University this week. Your help has been instrumental in my success, and my appreciation cannot be expressed in words. As one way of thanking you all, I am inviting anyone on the forum who will be in or near Ottawa at the time to attend the fair. My project will be open to the public this Friday, April 6th, from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm, and again this Saturday, April 7th, from 9:00 am - 11:30 am. It is titled, "The Impact of Environment on the Biodiversity of Pseudogygites latimarginatus." My project's number is 1101. I will also have some of my most prized fossils on display, as well as some edible specimens, for the Trilobite enthusiasts! I am not asking for anyone to go out of their way to see my project, this is just a simple invitation. Everyone is welcome.
  22. Pseudogygites pygidium

    From the album Billings Shale

    A P. latimarginatus pygidium from the Billings formation near St. Laurent, Ottawa.
  23. Pseudogygites pygidium

    From the album Billings Shale

    A partially pyritized P. latimarginatus pygidium from the Billings formation near St. Laurent, Ottawa.
  24. Trilobite Science Fair

    Attention TFF members! I'm posting this to bring you an extremely important announcement! (For Me) For the past few months, I have been posting topics regarding Ottawa fossils and the Trilobite Pseudogygites latimarginatus. I have been doing this for research and information for my grade 8 science fair project. This experiment involved the relationship between Ordovician sedimentation and the average lengths of Pseudogygites latimarginatus. The title was, "The impact of Environment on the Biodiversity of Pseudogygites latimarginatus." Though, other possible titles included, "Another one Trilo-Bites the Dust," "Trilo-Bite Sized Science," "Don't Trilo-Bite the Hand that Feeds You," and "Trilo-Bite Me!" Last week, I fully assembled the presentation board and all other related displays. I presented my project to three judges (including professors and students from Carleton University) in addition to many other people who passed by. The following day, my school held an assembly which would announce the top 5 winners of the grade 8 science fair. After much delay and suspense on my part, it was announced that I had won first place in my grade! This means that I will get the opportunity to compete in the Ontario regional science fair this April! It turns out that one of the reasons why I won first place was because the teachers who were doing research on my project's nature (name pronunciation) stumbled upon my many posts on this website! I will continue to make posts on the forum. I think that I should give acknowledgement to all the TFF members who helped me achieve my goal, or contributed in any way! This includes all the people who helped identify my mystery fossils and gave fossil hunting advice and locations during these past few months. These are in no particular order. Thank you all! Acknowledgements: Kane Ludwiga Tidgy's Dad Fossildude19 WhodamanHD Manticocerasman Rockwood Auspex ynot abyssunder Arizona Chris erose Herb old bones snolly50 fossilDAWG caldigger Max-fossils Bobby Rico RyanDye
  25. Diplocraterion?

    Hi again! I have another unidentified fossil from the Billings. It is a brown or dark yellow coloured streak. I think it must be some type of ichnofossil. To me, it reminds me of some fossils of Diplocraterion. It could also just be a streak made from another mineral, such as calcite. It is preserved alongside one almost full-length crinoid stem impression and one 3 dimensionally preserved specimen of the aforementioned animal.
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