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Found 32 results

  1. I wanted to share some of my projects with all of you. A hobby and side business of mine is creating dinosaur sculptures. I do all different kinds of things aside from dinos too, but to keep it relevant, we’ll stick to the mesozoic Featured in my profile picture is my raptor created from scrap metal used to construct railings. I named him Bambi (ironically not a Bambiraptor). Probably more like Deinonychus, he’s a pretty big chicken, but you let me know what you think. As of now he’s my favorite creation, hence why he’s featured in my profile pic. Still trying to figure out the paint job. I wish he’d stop scaring all the birds and deer away...
  2. Zdravo to all! Here is something new! Homotherium crenatidens which i've done few days ago.Hope u gonna like it! Enjoy
  3. Albicetus oxymycterus drawing

    Here's a new paleo-reconstuction I drew since the past two days of Albicetus oxymycterus, which is a mid-Miocene raptorial physeteroid none of you have probably heard about. Special thing between this little Moby-Dick and city I live in is that although it was not discovered directly in PV, it was discovered very nearby in Santa Barbara in the same formation and sublayer that exists here which highly suggests that it also swam here 16-14 million years ago. I tried to make this as scientifically accurate as possible using the resources I had, which included the entire 2015 paper establishing the genus Albicetus. I mainly used a pre-existing sketch of Aulophyseter morricei as body reference (which the paper stated is morphologically most similar to A. oxymycterus except for dentition) and used the paper's skull reconstruction for the head. I used a Zygophyseter-like head as the paper stated that the supracranial basin of the skull does not elongate to the end of the maxilla like that of Zygophyseter and Acrophyseter, which both posses snouts as a result. For the body size, I calculated the skull-body ratio by dividing the mean and lower condylobasal length estimates to the total calculated length, which came with either a 1:4.6 or 1:4.9 ratio. (Unrelated to the drawing, the 1:4-5 ratio is based on using a body formula for Physeter and Kogia spp.. If you use the upper Livyatan melvillei /Zygophyseter varolai estimates as reference, a ratio of 1:5.9 and total length of 8.6 meters is calculated) I don't know any of the advanced formulas some of you guys probably do know about and simply used division, so my calculations might not be the most accurate ones. I also put in a diver for scale this time! EXTRAS
  4. Eusmilus cerebralis

    Something new here!
  5. American Cheetah

    Proudly to represent American Cheetah ( Miracinonyx trumani)
  6. Machairodus giganteus

    I think i'm going draw after this one the Short - faced Bear.What do u think?
  7. Xenosmilus

    New!
  8. Finished few minutes ago
  9. Cave Lion

    What do u think about him?
  10. Smilodon populator

    The latest one!
  11. Darko's Paleoart 3

    Hope u will enjoy
  12. Hope u will enjoy
  13. Speculative Evolution

    Hello guys. I want your opinion on some thing, it's a paleoart idea I call Therizinopteros brazilienensis from the Santana Formation in Brazil. It's part of a late surviving group of Wukongopteroid pterosaurs that survived way into the Early Cretaceous. It was the last and most advanced member, a super predator, a hunter of other, bigger pterosaurs. It went after giants like Tapejara, Anhanguera, even the giant Thalassodromeus! This thing was a monster, and yet it only had a six foot wingspan. The reason why it can take down prey 5 times its size is because its killing method was brutal. There's a reason why it's name means scythe wing from Brazil. It was very fast and maneuverable and could stoop like a falcon. Males had a large aerodynamic crest that was colorful and could be used used for display purposes to attract a mate or to frighten a rival. They ha sharp teeth and large claws, the largest being their thumb claw, or their "killing claw". This claw was their most effective weapon. What they would do, they would fly up to the pterosaur or dive at them, extend their claws, then rip them open. If they killed over the ocean, they would dive in and pull the pterosaur back to shore to eat. they were strong swimmers, comparable to modern seabirds. This pterosaur was a very effective hunter. It's certainly not a friendly animal, but it sure is interesting. I will be posting my paleoart in a day or two when I finish. It's going to be awesome! I hope you guys like it.
  14. Heteromorph, right side view

    From the album james herrmann

    In this right side view of the sculpture I would like to show the green marble base. I chose this mottled green marble as a continuation of the kelp forest theme. I envision this ammonite pulling its way along the waving fronts of a kelp forest as it forages for small crustaceans. Kelp forests are contrasts of warm, bright beams of light and deep shadow. The marble is mottled in various shades of green much like looking down onto the kelp forest's waving fronds.
  15. Heteromorph, front view

    From the album james herrmann

    In this view I again wanted to show the cantilevered structure of the sculpture and the subtle color differences in the patination of the shell vs the body of the ammonite.
  16. Heteromorphic Ammonite Left Front View

    From the album james herrmann

    In this front left view I wanted to highlight the waving of the kelp. The challenge was to strongly support the heteromorph while still making the sculpture feel like there was movement and a lightness to the work.
  17. Heteromorphic Ammonite Left Side View

    From the album james herrmann

    This left side view of the sculpture shows the attachment of the ammonite to the kelp, actually there is a lot of bronze in the mass of tentacles. From the base to the top of the sculpture is approximately 40 inches.
  18. Yutyrannis huali

    Some more paleoart, this time of Yutyrannus huali. I gave him a very thick covering of feathers and a very tall keratin sheath over the low midline crest and the horns. The colors in the body are based off of a Barn Owl while the head colors are based off of Scott Hartman's Yutyrannus. I hope you like him.
  19. Ornitholestes hermanni

    An Ornitholestes hermanni traced off of Scott Hartman's skeletal. The feathering is very dromaeosaurid in appearance. I have a lot of artwork like this for my Field Guide to Mesozoic Reptiles. I hope you guys like it. If you have any species suggestions, let me know.
  20. Hi everyone! As I have mentioned several times, being a 3D artist I am trying to move into the field of paleoart. Recently I have started modeling Ceratosaurus nasicornis in 3D, and I really want to make it as accurate and plausible as possible. Here is what I have got so far: a basic model done in 3ds Max. After this I am planning to take it to ZBrush and add more muscle definition, sking wrinkles, scales and other fine details. At this stage this is just the base and I would like to share it with you guys in order to receive some feedback from those who know their dinosaur anatomy. Did I get the shape and overall structure right? Constructive criticism is more then welcome, pretty much this is what I am asking for here. 1. Mesh 2. Body 3. Perspective 4. Back 5. Top view 6. Head close-up
  21. Hello everybody, This is my first post and first piece of artwork I would like to share and, hopefully, receive some feedback. I do 3D animation and rendering for living, but paleontology is my life long interest and passion. Here is my 3D reconstruction of Cambrian trilobite Olenoides serratus that was a common member of the famous Burgess Shale biota. I actually live just 250 km apart from the famous Burgess Shale quarry (and 100 km from Albertan Red Deer badlands rich with dinosaur fosslis).
  22. Here are some cool images of Paleoart of new exciting discoveries for 2017. The link includes many more plus the story behind each. Enjoy. https://motherboard.vice.com/amp/en_us/article/wjp5jx/best-dinosaur-art-of-2017-paleoart-scientific-illustration-rom-zuul?utm_campaign=sharebutton&__twitter_impression=true
  23. Cephalopod Shell Color!

    Hello all! Recently I have been obsessed with cephalopods and realized there is a real lack of reconstructions of the color patterns on extinct nautiloids and ammonites! This led me to compile a list of known fossil color patterns on cephalopods. After a year of on and off research, I found about 90 species of cephalopods retaining official or undescribed, original patterning on their shells. These are the first 15 species on my list. The color markings are based both on descriptions and photographs of the fossil material. The shades of the markings are based on the fossils, but also inferred. I Hope you will appreciate my work!
  24. Drawing of Simolestes vorax

    Over the past few days I've been drawing up another paleo-reconstruction. After some time conflicting on which animal to draw, I settled on the rather under-celebrated pliosaur Simolestes vorax. S. vorax is a Jurassic pliosaur related to Liopleurodon, but is estimated to grow up to 10 meters in length, rivaling the size of the more famous pliosaur Kronosaurus. Heck, at one point there were even some theories that Simolestes was the owner of a gigantic lower front jaw dubbed "The NHM Symphysis", which was believed to be from a pliosaur exceeding 15 meters in length! Again, I used a Huion 1060PLUS Drawing Tablet and used Photoshop CS6. This time, drawing was a bit annoying due to constant need of omitting head details depicted on the skull I referenced. It took me a week to finish, and probably 5-6 whole hours in solid time due to the constant drawing/erasing.
  25. T-rex illustration

    Hey everyone! Here's my latest piece of paleoart, T-rex! I used ink and watercolors. I didn't want to color it the traditional green or brown so I looked at vultures for reference. I find it difficult to believe the theory that T-rex was exclusively a scavenger but I thought the vulture colors would make it look nasty. Hope you like it and I'd love to know what you all think! -Mike
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