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Found 47 results

  1. Chinese fruit

    Spirematospermum_wetzlerilagerstertifloracarpolzingib_Heer_Chandler_Zingiberac.pdf Spirematospermum wetzleri (Heer) Chandler (Zingiberaceae) from the Miocene ofWeichang, Hebei Province, North China and the phytogeographic history of the genus Ya Li Tie-Mei Yi Journal of Palaeogeography (2018) 7:7,3, Yue-Zhuo Li4 and Cheng-Sen Li1* Fossil zingiberids( gingers,bananas) are rare,of course outtake:
  2. L.S., As the title says, I am looking for literature on the cycads and bennettitaleans of Lune River, Tasmania. This Jurassic site is world-famous for its fern fossils, with numerous papers written on them, but it turns out to be quite difficult to find specific information on the other groups of plants that grew there. Hope you can help. Kind regards, Tim
  3. First ever find - Sydney NSW.

    This is my first ever find on my first ever fossil hunting trip with my 4 year old son. It appears to be a nice plant imprint. I found it in loose shale on Narabeen Head, Sydney, NSW. Would be nice to get confirmation of what it is, I'm very new to this. Thanks in advance for any comments.
  4. Late Paleozoic flora of the USA

    link This being: Stratigraphy and Fossil Plants from the Cutler Formation (Late Paleozoic) and their Paleoclimatic Implications, Eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado Kendall R. Grazul , Jacqueline E. Huntoon , and Jennifer M.K. O’Keefe from: GEOLOGY OF THE INTERMOUNTAIN WEST NO taxonomy,short review of the paleo-enviroment and the stratigraphy,several taxa illustrated NB: there is a "screen-optimized version",and this is NOT it 6,81 Mb
  5. a reassignment of Palezoic foliage

    kringspaphleboidfolairlinneankirej.1095-8339.2007.00616.x.pdf Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007,153, 477–488. With 18 figures NEW GENUS FOR LATE PALAEOZOIC NONCALCAREOUS ALGAE M. KRINGS ET AL. Perissothallus, a new genus for Late Pennsylvanian–Early Permian noncalcareous algae conventionally assigned to Schizopteris(aphleboid foliage) MICHAEL KRINGS, SHARON D. KLAVINS, MANFRED BARTHEL,SUNIA LAUSBERG, RUDOLPH SERBET, THOMAS N. TAYLOR and EDITH L. TAYLOR 0,943 MB
  6. Hello fellow fossil enthusiasts

    Found this in a southern Indiana creek. Its not a rock, kinda stumped yet excited. Thank you gentlemen for you're time.
  7. Recaus,worth your time 10 Mb,or thereabouts
  8. This ancient climate catastrophe is our best clue about Earth’s future Sarah Kaplan, the Washington Post, March 27, 2018 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/03/27/this-ancient-climate-catastrophe-is-our-best-clue-about-earths-future/?utm_term=.9b31f277e13c https://www.sciencealert.com/this-ancient-climate-catastrophe-may-provide-clues-for-for-facing-ours Yours, Paul H.
  9. A great lecture given last week by Dr. Kirk Johnson, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, on the topic of "Alaskan Palms, Antarctic Dinosaurs and Arctic Crocodiles: The Implications of Past Warm Worlds". http://web.mit.edu/webcast/EAPS/1810/ From the webpage: "Alaskan Palms, Antarctic Dinosaurs and Arctic Crocodiles: The Implications of Past Warm Worlds" With little more than picks and shovels, paleontologists can access ancient organisms, ecosystems, and biomes. This “time travel with a shovel” is a surprisingly effective tool to document and visualize ancient worlds. Forests first appeared on Earth around 380 million years ago and since then their distribution has responded to changing climates and continental configurations. The distribution of extant biomes is controlled by a steep latitudinal temperature gradient that ranges from frigid poles to a hot equatorial zone. One of the most surprising aspects of Earth’s history is the fact that the polar regions, which are the realm of ice and tundra today, have been extensively forested in the past. As today’s climate warms, these past polar ecosystems are becoming increasingly relevant as indicators of future conditions. About the Speaker Dr. Kirk Johnson is the Sant Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. He oversees more than 440 employees and a collection of more than 145 million objects—the largest natural history collection in the world. The Museum hosts more than 7 million visitors annually and, in 2017, its scientists published over 760 scientific research papers and described more than 300 new species. As a paleontologist who has led expeditions that have resulted in the discovery of more than 1,400 fossil sites, his research focuses on fossil plants and the extinction of the dinosaurs. He is known for his scientific articles, popular books, museum exhibitions, documentaries, and collaborations with artists. In 2010-11, he led the excavation of an ice age site near Snowmass Village, Colorado, that recovered more than 5,400 bones of mammoths, mastodons and other ice age animals. This dig was featured in the NOVA documentary, Ice Age Death Trap, and in Johnson’s book, Digging Snowmastodon, Discovering an Ice Age World in the Colorado Rockies. His recent documentaries include the three-part NOVA series Making North America, which aired on PBS networks in November 2015, and The Great Yellowstone Thaw which premiered on PBS in June 2017. His latest book, Ancient Wyoming, explores the prehistory and geology of the Bighorn Basin. Have fun!
  10. Turning over an old leaf

    http://tmgb.museucienciesjournals.cat/files/TMGB_22_2016_pp_57-100_Marmi.pdf Visually impressive (re)study* of a well-known European leaf macrofossil site. About 5,1 Mb and RECOMMENDED!!!!! *the first one(thesis,2002) by Vicente Castells is in Catalan edit:additional info on the locality(Villalba Breve/Marmi et al,2015)
  11. Kornei, Katherine, 2018, Signatures of Dinosaur Poop Found in Cretaceous Coal Seams. EOS Earth and Space News, vol. 99, no. 1, p. 5. https://eos.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Jan-18_magazine.pdf https://eos.org/current-issues https://eos.org/articles/signatures-of-dinosaur-poop-found-in-cretaceous-coal-seams Doughty, C.E., 2017. Herbivores increase the global availability of nutrients over millions of years. Nature ecology & evolution, 1(12), pp. 1820-1827. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0341-1 Yours, Paul H.
  12. Upper Paleozoic of Texas

    "Permocarboniferous" caveats given its age(1952): outdated taxonomy for some taxa,possibly The photographs are poorly scanned and leave something to be desired* Archer,Baylor,Wichita,Throckmorton,Young and Clay counties About 5,3 Mb edit:make that "practically useless",morphological details not visible Some good line drawings,though apologies if repost
  13. Hi, For people interested in plant fossils, there is an open access 2017 eBook about the paleobotany of Australia online. It is; History of the Australian Vegetation: Cretaceous to Recent Edited by Robert S. Hill, 2017, University of Adelaide Press http://www.oapen.org/search?identifier=628112 http://www.oapen.org/search?keyword=History+of+the+Australian+Vegetation http://www.oapen.org/home Yours, Paul H.
  14. Late Devonian plant

    Can any of the paleobotanists out there help me to identify this Late Devonian plant? Found it in the Catskill formation, North of Harrisburg, PA. I love the preservation and the coloration, but I don't know what I'm looking at! Correction: I first posted that this was "Middle Devonian". On second look, the Catskill formation is "Late Devonian". My bad.
  15. I have a box of some freebie fossil plant publications to give away. Mostly Maritimes. And a few others on western USA and the Arctic. Includes paleobotany textbook. Free to anyone in the Nova Scotia or New Brunswick in the Maritimes who has a current interest in the subject or studying the local stratigraphy. Decent condition but used. Please, personal message only. If you dont hear back, box is taken.
  16. Looking for plant ID

    This is carbonized plant material from the Selma Chalk formation, central Alabama. It is not uncommon to find terrestrial "driftwood" but this is the first time I have found what appears to be a fruiting body. There is a vertical center with radiating structures. Reminds me superficially of a proteaceae but I have no background on the subject. Any paleobotanists out there? s
  17. calamites

    http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/83/566/490.full.pdf
  18. paleobotany

    I have found a piece of petrified wood that I have ID'd as Paraphyllanthoxylon, thought to be a large common tree during the tropical Cretaceous. Very near it, I found a piece of petrified wood that is from the genus Quercus, very modern looking. the two shouldn't be found together as I understand their temporal distribution. Does anybody have a time range for when Paraphyllathoxylon is thought to have existed? I can't find an age range in any of the literature I have looked through (far from an exhaustive search). Brent Ashcraft
  19. Some of us fossil collectors believe there is no such thing as a bad day fossil collecting. Well, yesterday at Red Hill, PA it was muddy, rainy and cold. I'll will have to admit it was still a good day fossil collecting. One of my objectives to collecting at this Upper Devonian site is to find fossil plants, namely Archaeopteris. Well it happened big time. A picture of my truck tailgate tells the whole story of my catch of the day. What was found were 3 species of Archaeopteris, fertile and infertile leaves, large plates and small pieces that I liked too much to discard.
  20. Unknown Tennessee Cretaceous Botanicals

    This is a topic I've been meaning to create in the I.D. section for some time now. Hopefully it will be an easier way for interested members to access information regarding my paleobotanical materials. I likewise encourage anyone with Cretaceous Tennessee specimens to post in this topic, to create a better understanding of botanical fossils/palaeoecology/palaeoclimatology, ect. from the cretaceous of Tennessee. I intend to add new materials to this topic for years to come,to ensure a way for researchers to view specimens easily, a benifical concept considering my materials are scattered throughout the TFF in numerous posts in such a way as to be impossible to track for most members and guests of the Forum. Of course a section compiled of all my unknowns will beneficial to myself also. Unless specifically listed with the botanical, all material I post will be Campanian or later. These specimens are recovered material from many diverse sites I collect from. Thank you for viewing my materials and helping with identifications...an untrained person like myself certainly needs all the help I can get!
  21. Hey all, I am in need of a little assistance. I am starting a new research project on the fossil record of American Chestnuts and am having trouble finding any information on their early history and evolution. I have found that they started in Louisiana and moved up northward, but I am having trouble finding dates on when exactly. I was also curious if anyone has an idea of where a good site would be to maybe find an American Chestnut tree leaf (or chestnut) fossil? I know some have been found in Oregon and Idaho, but I am looking for somewhere near southeastern Tennessee. I am willing to make a drive, just don't really have the funds (or time) to fly anywhere to search. Thanks for your help!
  22. Hello all, I came across the attached fossils in shales of the Breathitt Group in southeastern Kentucky, USA (Pennsylvanian, Atokan). The associated strata are full of typical foliage, like Alloiopteris, Neuopteris, etc, as well as calamites and pteridosperm stems (like the ones in the photos). The specific fossils that I can't identify are the small, detached, orbicular "leaves" located near the pteridosperm rachis in the first photo (close up of a different one in the second). They're about 1-2cm in width, some have lost their carbon, some have kept it. There's about 11 of these on the slab and counterpart, all nearly identical. I've collected Pennsylvanin foliage for a couple years now, and haven't seen this before. Textbooks, including Taylor and Taylor (2009), didn't seem to include structures like it. I've also asked around a bit - including a professional Kentucky paleobotanist - but to no avail. And that brings me here . . . any ideas? Tom
  23. I've been completing a "working paper" on some significant new finds that add some new understanding about the "upland" flora of the Lower Pennsylvanian. I'll be sending what I have to some people like Dr. Bill DiMichele and others to get feedback and determine next steps. But I had a few questions that I'd like some help with: 1. What kind of embargo on information about a working paper is typical. Do I run into issues for it to get published if I share the working paper widely? Should I avoid sharing information about it on the Fossil Forum? 2. Does the location need to be fully revealed? If there is desire by the landowners to keep the location undisclosed, what would one do? Could the location be fully described, but have specific coordiates only available upon request? 3. I do understand that the main specimens being researched in the paper must be housed in a public museum. If there are secondary items being described to understand the setting, do they also need to be public? And, if you do a census (relative abundance of different species) of a location, do all items included in that census need to be housed publicly? 4. What is the process typically used to determine relative abundance of different plant species in a location?
  24. Unidentified Paleobotanical Pic 1

    From the album Most of my collection

    This has to be one of the strangest paleobotanicals i've ever laid eyes on. The material has been replaced by siderite or some other iron type stuff=iron wood! It has been looked at by one Paleobotanist and one Geologist,neither had saw something like this before, and i was told there was a possibility it could be a new species of some type! It's still unidentified. The preservation is nothing short of remarkable....this specimen is so incredibly life like, that one would almost expect it to start moving in your hand! All the internal parts can still be viewed, even veins! Strange....you almost expect a heart to start beating in it! was collected in 2013 from a Late Cretaceous Campanian formation. The outside surface has many holes in a regular pattern which lead to internal parts.
  25. Unidentified Paleobotanical Pic 2

    From the album Most of my collection

    See pic 1 for a description.
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