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Found 55 results

  1. back from the future:end-Permian events

    VAIMCLOUH End-Permian (252 Mya) deforestation, wildfires and flooding—An ancient biotic crisis with lessons for the present Vivi Vajda,, StephenMcLoughlin, Chris Mays, Tracy D.Frank, Christopher R.Fielding, AllenTevyaw, Veiko Lehsten, Malcolm Bocking, Robert S.Nicoll Earth and Planetary Science Letters 529(2020)115875 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! NB: 7,3 Mb editorial note: Having some pre-existing knowledge of organic petrology,palynology,geochemistry would be helpful
  2. Fingerprints of ancient forests offer rare look at Florida 16 million years ago by Halle Marchese Florida Museum, September 18, 2019 https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/science/ancient-forest-fingerprints/ Alum Bluff fossils show life 15 million years ago Danielle Ivanov, gainesville.com, Sep 29, 2019 https://www.gainesville.com/news/20190929/alum-bluff-fossils-show-life-15-million-years-ago The paper is: Lott, T.A., Manchester, S.R. and Corbett, S.L., 2019. The Miocene flora of Alum Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. Acta Palaeobotanica, 59(1), pp.75-129. Open access https://content.sciendo.com/view/journals/acpa/59/1/article-p75.xml Yours, Paul H.
  3. Fossil News Summer 19 issue is available

    The Summer 2019 issue of Fossil News features the paleoart of Jimi Catanzaro, an article about late-Cretaceous pterosaurs in Cuba, more on that ammonite in amber you've been hearing so much about, an exclusive excerpt from Enrico Bonino’s new book about fossil medusozoans and how primitive algal mats helped preserve them, and a whole lot more! tinyurl.com/fnsubscribe
  4. What the era of sabre-toothed cats and giant sharks says about climate change by Simon Levey, Imperial College London, April 2019 https://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/190795/what-sabretoothed-cats-giant-sharks-says/ The meeting is: The Pliocene: The Last Time Earth had >400 ppm of Atmospheric CO2 Royal Meteorological Society Meeting https://www.rmets.org/event/pliocene-last-time-earth-had-400-ppm-atmospheric-co2 The video of the talks is at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmdJJEuwTrg Other articles are: Last time CO2 levels were this high, there were trees at the South Pole Pliocene beech fossils in Antarctica when CO2 was at similar level to today point to planet’s future, The Guardian, April 3, 2019 https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/apr/03/south-pole-tree-fossils-indicate-impact-of-climate-change Dire future etched in the past: CO2 at 3-million year-old levels by Patrick Galey And Marlowe Hood, PhysOrg, April 5, 2019 https://phys.org/news/2019-04-dire-future-etched-co2-million.html Yours, Paul H.
  5. I am currently working on a diorama/sculpture featuring a Pinacosaurus, some Protoceratops, and maybe a Velociraptor or alvarezsaur. From what I understand from the papers I have read, the Djadokhta formation was a semi-arid to arid biome, but I can't find any information on what kind of vegetation would have been present at that time. Does anyone have any insight on what kind of plant life you would expect to see in a Cretaceous desert? Thanks in advance. Progress pics coming soon.
  6. G.Rex:classic plant taphonomy

    GMR THE FORMATION OF PLANT COMPRESSION FOSSILS: EXPERIMENTAL AND SEDIMENTOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS Gillian M.Rex Thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the University of London about 13 MB/TYPESCRIPT IMHO:unputdownable/indispensable for those interested in (Paleozoic) plant fossils below: a composite i concocted to give you an idea her Palaeontology article is probably somewaht of a condensation of this piece
  7. The Republic of Washington

    PALEOALLIUM BILLGENSELI GEN. ET SP. NOV.: FOSSIL MONOCOT REMAINS FROM THE LATEST EARLY EOCENE REPUBLIC FLORA, NORTHEASTERN WASHINGTON STATE, USA Kathleen B. Pigg,1,* Finley A. Bryan,† and Melanie L. DeVore‡ Int. J. Plant Sci. 179(6):477–486. 2018. Pigg-Bryan-DeVore-lagerstUSAcenozoi2018-Paleoallium.pdf IMHO a nice marriage of paleontology and neontology,and pretty well illustrated,too RECOMMENDED
  8. Chinese fruit

    Spirematospermum_wetzlerilagerstertifloracarpolzingib_Heer_Chandler_Zingiberac.pdf Spirematospermum wetzleri (Heer) Chandler (Zingiberaceae) from the Miocene ofWeichang, Hebei Province, North China and the phytogeographic history of the genus Ya Li Tie-Mei Yi Journal of Palaeogeography (2018) 7:7,3, Yue-Zhuo Li4 and Cheng-Sen Li1* Fossil zingiberids( gingers,bananas) are rare,of course outtake:
  9. L.S., As the title says, I am looking for literature on the cycads and bennettitaleans of Lune River, Tasmania. This Jurassic site is world-famous for its fern fossils, with numerous papers written on them, but it turns out to be quite difficult to find specific information on the other groups of plants that grew there. Hope you can help. Kind regards, Tim
  10. First ever find - Sydney NSW.

    This is my first ever find on my first ever fossil hunting trip with my 4 year old son. It appears to be a nice plant imprint. I found it in loose shale on Narabeen Head, Sydney, NSW. Would be nice to get confirmation of what it is, I'm very new to this. Thanks in advance for any comments.
  11. Late Paleozoic flora of the USA

    link This being: Stratigraphy and Fossil Plants from the Cutler Formation (Late Paleozoic) and their Paleoclimatic Implications, Eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado Kendall R. Grazul , Jacqueline E. Huntoon , and Jennifer M.K. O’Keefe from: GEOLOGY OF THE INTERMOUNTAIN WEST NO taxonomy,short review of the paleo-enviroment and the stratigraphy,several taxa illustrated NB: there is a "screen-optimized version",and this is NOT it 6,81 Mb
  12. a reassignment of Palezoic foliage

    kringspaphleboidfolairlinneankirej.1095-8339.2007.00616.x.pdf Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007,153, 477–488. With 18 figures NEW GENUS FOR LATE PALAEOZOIC NONCALCAREOUS ALGAE M. KRINGS ET AL. Perissothallus, a new genus for Late Pennsylvanian–Early Permian noncalcareous algae conventionally assigned to Schizopteris(aphleboid foliage) MICHAEL KRINGS, SHARON D. KLAVINS, MANFRED BARTHEL,SUNIA LAUSBERG, RUDOLPH SERBET, THOMAS N. TAYLOR and EDITH L. TAYLOR 0,943 MB
  13. Hello fellow fossil enthusiasts

    Found this in a southern Indiana creek. Its not a rock, kinda stumped yet excited. Thank you gentlemen for you're time.
  14. Recaus,worth your time 10 Mb,or thereabouts
  15. This ancient climate catastrophe is our best clue about Earth’s future Sarah Kaplan, the Washington Post, March 27, 2018 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/03/27/this-ancient-climate-catastrophe-is-our-best-clue-about-earths-future/?utm_term=.9b31f277e13c https://www.sciencealert.com/this-ancient-climate-catastrophe-may-provide-clues-for-for-facing-ours Yours, Paul H.
  16. A great lecture given last week by Dr. Kirk Johnson, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, on the topic of "Alaskan Palms, Antarctic Dinosaurs and Arctic Crocodiles: The Implications of Past Warm Worlds". http://web.mit.edu/webcast/EAPS/1810/ From the webpage: "Alaskan Palms, Antarctic Dinosaurs and Arctic Crocodiles: The Implications of Past Warm Worlds" With little more than picks and shovels, paleontologists can access ancient organisms, ecosystems, and biomes. This “time travel with a shovel” is a surprisingly effective tool to document and visualize ancient worlds. Forests first appeared on Earth around 380 million years ago and since then their distribution has responded to changing climates and continental configurations. The distribution of extant biomes is controlled by a steep latitudinal temperature gradient that ranges from frigid poles to a hot equatorial zone. One of the most surprising aspects of Earth’s history is the fact that the polar regions, which are the realm of ice and tundra today, have been extensively forested in the past. As today’s climate warms, these past polar ecosystems are becoming increasingly relevant as indicators of future conditions. About the Speaker Dr. Kirk Johnson is the Sant Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. He oversees more than 440 employees and a collection of more than 145 million objects—the largest natural history collection in the world. The Museum hosts more than 7 million visitors annually and, in 2017, its scientists published over 760 scientific research papers and described more than 300 new species. As a paleontologist who has led expeditions that have resulted in the discovery of more than 1,400 fossil sites, his research focuses on fossil plants and the extinction of the dinosaurs. He is known for his scientific articles, popular books, museum exhibitions, documentaries, and collaborations with artists. In 2010-11, he led the excavation of an ice age site near Snowmass Village, Colorado, that recovered more than 5,400 bones of mammoths, mastodons and other ice age animals. This dig was featured in the NOVA documentary, Ice Age Death Trap, and in Johnson’s book, Digging Snowmastodon, Discovering an Ice Age World in the Colorado Rockies. His recent documentaries include the three-part NOVA series Making North America, which aired on PBS networks in November 2015, and The Great Yellowstone Thaw which premiered on PBS in June 2017. His latest book, Ancient Wyoming, explores the prehistory and geology of the Bighorn Basin. Have fun!
  17. Turning over an old leaf

    http://tmgb.museucienciesjournals.cat/files/TMGB_22_2016_pp_57-100_Marmi.pdf Visually impressive (re)study* of a well-known European leaf macrofossil site. About 5,1 Mb and RECOMMENDED!!!!! *the first one(thesis,2002) by Vicente Castells is in Catalan edit:additional info on the locality(Villalba Breve/Marmi et al,2015)
  18. Kornei, Katherine, 2018, Signatures of Dinosaur Poop Found in Cretaceous Coal Seams. EOS Earth and Space News, vol. 99, no. 1, p. 5. https://eos.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Jan-18_magazine.pdf https://eos.org/current-issues https://eos.org/articles/signatures-of-dinosaur-poop-found-in-cretaceous-coal-seams Doughty, C.E., 2017. Herbivores increase the global availability of nutrients over millions of years. Nature ecology & evolution, 1(12), pp. 1820-1827. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0341-1 Yours, Paul H.
  19. Upper Paleozoic of Texas

    "Permocarboniferous" caveats given its age(1952): outdated taxonomy for some taxa,possibly The photographs are poorly scanned and leave something to be desired* Archer,Baylor,Wichita,Throckmorton,Young and Clay counties About 5,3 Mb edit:make that "practically useless",morphological details not visible Some good line drawings,though apologies if repost
  20. Hi, For people interested in plant fossils, there is an open access 2017 eBook about the paleobotany of Australia online. It is; History of the Australian Vegetation: Cretaceous to Recent Edited by Robert S. Hill, 2017, University of Adelaide Press http://www.oapen.org/search?identifier=628112 http://www.oapen.org/search?keyword=History+of+the+Australian+Vegetation http://www.oapen.org/home Yours, Paul H.
  21. Late Devonian plant

    Can any of the paleobotanists out there help me to identify this Late Devonian plant? Found it in the Catskill formation, North of Harrisburg, PA. I love the preservation and the coloration, but I don't know what I'm looking at! Correction: I first posted that this was "Middle Devonian". On second look, the Catskill formation is "Late Devonian". My bad.
  22. I have a box of some freebie fossil plant publications to give away. Mostly Maritimes. And a few others on western USA and the Arctic. Includes paleobotany textbook. Free to anyone in the Nova Scotia or New Brunswick in the Maritimes who has a current interest in the subject or studying the local stratigraphy. Decent condition but used. Please, personal message only. If you dont hear back, box is taken.
  23. Looking for plant ID

    This is carbonized plant material from the Selma Chalk formation, central Alabama. It is not uncommon to find terrestrial "driftwood" but this is the first time I have found what appears to be a fruiting body. There is a vertical center with radiating structures. Reminds me superficially of a proteaceae but I have no background on the subject. Any paleobotanists out there? s
  24. calamites

    http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/83/566/490.full.pdf
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