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Found 138 results

  1. I will introduce this article by quoting the last sentence: "The place has been the site of fossil finds since the 1980s, and many of the discoveries - like this latest one - are made by dedicated amateur palaeontologists." LINK to article
  2. Croc Tooth?

  3. Pachygaleus tooth?

    Hey everyone, realizing right now that I haven't posted any fossils of my own in quite a while on the forum. Anyway, I found this tooth back in 2016 on my trip to the potomac river in maryland. It was found at purse state park which has exposures of the paleocene Aquia formation. When I first took a closer look at this tooth I was surprised to see that it had a shape which I had associated with Tiger sharks. I did some research online and found that Pachygaleus would be a match as they are present in that strata. It has been a while since that initial discovery but I wanted to confirm my idea on the forum. It's about .6 cm wide at the root and about .4 cm long. Thanks, PN
  4. So I was rooting again around in the garage and found a couple plates I had bought a few years back and never tracked down an ID for. Tentative provenance was Paleocene from Montana. I found this article recently and was wondering if it could be one of the genera/sp described or one of the other genera mentioned in the discussion section. Trapa, Trapago, Fortuna, Quereuxia. STOCKEY, R. A., AND G. W. ROTHWELL. 1997. The aquatic angiosperm Trapago angulata from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) St. Mary River Formation of southern Alberta. Int. J. Pl. Sci. 158: 83-94. Can be found here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/240563741_The_Aquatic_Angiosperm_Trapago_angulata_from_the_Upper_Cretaceous_Maastrichtian_St_Mary_River_Formation_of_Southern_Alberta I also was looking at the USGS pub 375 https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0375/report.pdf My plates have a number of leaflets and fragments with very little venation visible and in a pale gray and a light pink color in a very fine matrix.....Many of the leaflets have small teeth... Plates: Crenulations Leaflets and partial venation Anyone have any expertise in these? Looks like the authors were indicating more study is needed in this area of aquatic plants--that was 20 years ago. Any help is appreciated. Thanks! Regards, Chris
  5. Long ago, back in the late 1980s, I lived in British Columbia and had the opportunity to collect in the Late Cretaceous Nanaimo Group. I realized that many of the crabs and lobsters I was collecting were undescribed, so I made an effort to collect any material I came across. I tried to find a collaborator willing to help describe the material, but (for reasons I described elsewhere) that didn't work out, and I was encouraged to take on the writing myself. Since I had to focus on my own research career, which actually has nothing to do with paleontology, the project languished and over time most of the taxa were described independently by others, based on specimens collected by other people. Although I would have loved to contribute to the published record of the Nanaimo Group I became convinced that that would not happen. Then, about two years ago, I was corresponding with Torrey Nyborg (a fossil decapod expert well known to some Forum members @fossisle @MB @Al Dente) and found out that he was working on some new species of the crab genus Archaeopus from Vancouver Island and California. I sent him my material, one thing led to another, and the paper has just been published. I am very grateful that Torrey included me as a coauthor. I was also able to contribute the holotype of Archaeopus morenoensis (Figure 15 panel A, attached below), which is actually from California. So thanks to Torrey I feel my long-ago efforts paid off. Don
  6. Properca angusta AGASSIZ, 1843

  7. Nothing to crazy going on today. My wife found this piece of bone and she wants to know what it is. My initial thought is it was some random piece of croc but now that I’m looking at it closer I’m really unsure. Take a look tell me what you think
  8. After the long month without fossil hunting, we decided to go to Purse on a free weekend. Now that it is a former state park, it's a lot harder to find because there is no address to it, so hopefully it can recover from some of the hunting that has taken place upon it's shores. I really, really wanted some nice Macrotas after all the talk I had heard about them, and thankfully, Purse didn't disappoint. It was the middle of hunting season there, and we werent wearing anything particularly bright, it was a little nerve racking hearing the boom of gunshots far of in the distance. We started by going right towards the cliffs after hearing a comment about a big otodus found there. After only finding small things, including some nice Cretolamna and Carcharias, as well as a couple goblins, we turned left, and that was where things got interesting, still peppered with the occasional crack of a gun. My identification for Paleocene fossils isn't positive, because I'm used more to Miocene, but I believe the tooth on the right may be a Macrota. It's around an inch. The teeth kept racking up. We had easily found at least two hundred, and I really can't wait to identify and label them. We were both quite tired, being as we had gotten up pretty early that day and explored the whole beach. No otodus, but around 230 teeth and hopefully a big ole' Macrota!
  9. Hello All! I found this shark tooth at Purse State Park in Charles County, MD. Located on the Potomac River, these fossils are from the Aquia Formation. As a novice fossil hunter, I would love some help in identifying this tooth. Is this a Cretolamna sp. (appendiculata?) or Otodus obliquus? Thanks so much in advance! ~Natalie
  10. I would consider 2016 to be the year that my fossil hunting career really took off, I had spent trips prior to this grooming and developing my skills and it began to show in this period. My school vacations have always been the time where I've been able to get out into the field and go fossil hunting, this particular opportunity was afforded to me by my class trip to Washington D.C. which then lead into my April vacation. Having devised a plan to go fossil hunting before leaving, my dad picked me up at the end of the DC visit before the rest of the group took the grueling bus ride back to NH. From there we went south to Charles county, MD with the intention of going to Purse State Park in hopes of finding some Paleocene shark teeth. And find them we did! After parking, we walked down a trail which led down to the waterfront and a long strip of gravely beach. I soon found out just how bountiful this area could be when looking in the right places. At the end of the day we had found plenty of Shark's teeth and ray dental plates. The majority of the teeth came from various species of sand tiger sharks which patrolled the waters of the greater D.C. area 59 million years ago when it was covered by a warm shallow sea. Here's the haul we had after a few hours collecting.
  11. Unknown leaf or leaves

    I am looking for some help IDing these leaves. They were collected less than a mile north of Miles City. They came out of the Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation. They are Paleocene, Danian age. These leaf fossils were with Sequoia and grass leaves.
  12. In the current (July-August 2018) issue of American Scientist magazine there's an article on champsosaurs. Anyone who's collected Late Cretaceous fossils in Montana, the Dakotas, Wyoming, or southern Canada has probably found a few. You tend to get just a paragraph or two about the group in mainstream science articles about animals that survived the K/T extinctions but there's a whole article about them. Check out your local Barnes & Noble if you don't have online access.
  13. Priscacara done!

    I just have to brag about @Ptychodus04 a bit more. This man is a master at preparing fossil fish. Someday I hope to be a fraction as good as he is. Here's what he ended up with on the Priscacara I sent him. This was not an easy prep. The right side was completely covered with matrix and the left side exposed. He glued the pieces back together and started prepping on the right side top down. Excellent job Kris. Here's what he sent me.
  14. Possible rare fish id

    Fossil Forum Friends, I put some fish up for possible trading on the trades section and wise @Fossildude19 reached out to me with a possible identification as a Amphiplaga brachyptera. This species makes up less than 1% of the known fish collected in the Green River Formation. Upon closer inspection it appears to be that species or it might just be a disarticulated Knightia. I really can't tell as I'm not a fish expert. Please provide your input. If it is a A. brachyptera can someone please PM me with a quote for preparing the fish and once it's prepared I'll get it framed at Michael's craft shop in a custom frame with an identification plaque. Shouldn't be a tough prep job. The fish is small and the matrix soft I just don't want to screw it up if it is a rare one. See attached. FYI @Ptychodus04 @sseth @FossilDudeCO @RJB
  15. Fossil Fish Preparation

    FYI @Ptychodus04 @RJB I have some Herkimer Green River Formation fish I just dug up last month and they look really nice but half of them are covered in the sedimentary limestone. There's a bunch that are halfway covered. The matrix is real sticky and just doesn't want to come off. I tried pulling off chunks with some dental tools but had to quickly stop as that was damaging the fossil. Every time I pull up a chunk it takes the fossil with it. I'm thinking about getting a nice air scribe. I found a nice Chicago Pneumatic CP-9361 but have heard that these scribes can be tough on fossils. All these fish are from the split fish layers and I've heard this layer can be challenging to work with. Should I pickup the CP-9361 or go for another scribe such as an AERO/ARO? I can't seem to find an AERO/ARO anywhere. Paleotools sells a modified ARO but those are about $650 and that's a bit past my budget. What are your thoughts? I was also going to get a decent sized air compressor that goes up to 125 PSI. Thanks everyone. Here's a picture with some of the fish. The bottom right fish are good but the rest need to be prepared out.
  16. ID Help Needed Paleocene Bone

    Found today and at first thought it was a Paleocene Croc Scapula. But, a FB member mentioned it could be a Paleocene mammal Talus. Thanks for looking, Any and all advice is appreciated Paleocene, Aquia Formation, Maryland
  17. invertebrate?

    Anyone want to hazard a guess on this one? Its an undulating series of ridges and depressions uniform in size. The matrix has an ash character to it. It has a calcareous look but fails the vinegar test. Probably marine in origin. The only other fossil associated with it was a very small turritella impression. Found south of Thomasville, Alabama which makes it Paleocene.
  18. Paleocene vertebra from who?

    Went for my first time to purse state park proper (Douglas point is my usual Potomac haunt). Mostly for micro, but I did a bit of surface hunting. Found this beautiful vert, find of the day by far (disappointing otherwise). I’ve no clue what it is, though I assume some sort of gharial. My quick research brought me to eosuchus being the best candidate. With a surprising resemblance to champsosaurus but I think that’s unlikely. Any ideas? Gonna go ahead and tag @MarcoSr. Thanks!
  19. Purse State park tooth to ID

    A couple of weeks ago I stopped by Blue Banks, just north of Purse State Park MD. The Paleocene Aquia Formation is exposed there, and teeth and bones of a variety of species erode from the exposures and accumulate in gravel along the shore. Unfortunately the Potomac River was in flood stage, so the gravel along the shore was submerged despite the low tide. A driving rain storm did not help matters. I scooped gravel and passed it through a couple of screens, and recovered a handful of the usual small sand tigers and ray teeth, before calling it quits after an hour or so. The following was the largest tooth I collected by some margin. I don't see anything like it on Elasmo.com. There are no serrations and no cusps. Any suggestions for an ID would be most welcome. Don
  20. Paleocene Turtle Plastron

    I found this cool specimen quite a while back in the Paleocene of Maryland and never finished prepping it. I still have a ways to go, especially to reduce the size of the matrix because it is super heavy. This came from a much larger size boulder of matrix. I only saw a tiny piece exposed and kept digging to expose more and break it away from the large boulder. I believe this is a section of plastron from a turtle shell (bottom) from possibly a leatherback turtle.
  21. So, I found this today in the Paleocene Aquia Formation of Maryland. Obviously it can't be an ammonite, because they were already extinct. It's a Nautilus steinkern, right, not some sort of gastropod? Thanks! Matt
  22. Heeding advice from members here I decided to stay away from Brownie's and the cliffs due to the recent flood of rain that we've been getting (it's even sprinkling today) and headed to one of my favorite spots, Purse State Park! I stayed close to the entrance because by the time I got there the tide was already coming in, and I wanted to avoid the cliff-ier areas. The swimming snakes, cliff faces full of bees, and millions of floating spider webs acted as a decent deterrent as well! I actually walked a bit to the right and then on my way back walked past the entrance because of how high the water had come in... but as if it were meant to be I found my biggest tooth after I walked beyond the entrance! There was noticeable new material from the cliffs falling and down towards Douglas Point looked nearly impassable with a rather large cliff fall down that direction. And now for the teeth! I have one question about a tooth that I can't really identify. I am still new to the hobby and I am getting better about not going to Fossil ID every time something pops up but with not much experience sometimes that is hard! Only my second Otodus (maybe? I still am having a hard time with the Cretalamna's vs. Otodus) ever, still looking for that big one: My run of the mill finds, accompanied by a handful more that I didn't bother to take pics of: This one I'm a bit stumped but I'm sure everyone hear will have no problem with ID... it's fairly large so that's why I don't think it's just a Tiger or something similar but it's missing the cusps that would make it another species (if it were even supposed to have them). Any help would be appreciated! With finals finally over and a new kayak in tow I hope to have better and more in-depth reports this upcoming summer. I want to see if all of this armchair Google Earth imagery analyst pays off... haha. Just wanted to thank everyone on here because I've gathered so much knowledge even though I may not post much. I am still super new! Hopefully this is just a small start to the fossil hunting that this summer will bring! Almost forgot to mention that Purse is located in the Aquia formation of the Paleocene. Thanks for reading!
  23. Hello, I found this leaf fossil north of Glenrock, Wyoming in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Can anyone help me ID this fossil? The fossils were plentiful! Thanks in advance!! Greg Kruse, Casper, WY
  24. From the album Tertiary

    Ostrea tecticosta (bivalve) Paleocene Hornerstown Formation Crosswicks Creek New Egypt, N.J.
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