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Found 155 results

  1. What do y'all think these are? They're bits of debris from a slide I was working on. All I can really tell you is that they were photographed at 40X magnification, scale bar 50 microns. This set of slides is across the Paleocene to Eocene, but I unfortunately don't know what rock this single slide sample is from. Sample is from the Hanna Basin in Wyoming.
  2. Croc tooth? Aquia formation

    Hello all, first post on the forums despite joining awhile ago. Last winter I was fortunate enough to have some serious luck at Purse State Park in 2 consecutive trips while I was on break. Thanks to @Williamb55I was able to finally muster some motivation to seek some help to ID what I believe is a Crocodile tooth and Otodus from the Paleocene Epoch. Of course this could be inaccurate but I would love some insight into my find, comments and replies are appreciated. Best, DF
  3. Colorado Fossils Show How Mammals Raced to Fill Dinosaurs’ Void An unusually rich trove found in Colorado reveals the world in which our mammalian forebears evolved into larger creatures. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/24/science/fossils-mammals-dinosaurs-colorado.html Fossil trove shows life's fast recovery after big extinction by Malcolm Ritter, PhysOrg. October 24, 2019 https://phys.org/news/2019-10-fossil-trove-life-fast-recovery.html Yours, Paul H.
  4. The Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Acidified the Ocean in a Flash The Chicxulub event was as damaging to life in the oceans as it was to creatures on land, a study shows. New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/21/science/chicxulub-asteroid-ocean-acid.html Tiny shell fossils reveal how ocean acidification can cause mass extinction By Julie Zaugg, CNN, October 22, 2019 https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/22/europe/ocean-acidification-asteroid-intl-hnk-scn/index.html New study underpins the idea of a sudden impact killing off dinosaurs and much of the other life, GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre October 22, 2019 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191022080721.htm The open access paper is: Michael J. Henehan, Andy Ridgwell, Ellen Thomas, Shuang Zhang, Laia Alegret, Daniela N. Schmidt, James W. B. Rae, James D. Witts, Neil H. Landman, Sarah E. Greene, Brian T. Huber, James R. Super, Noah J. Planavsky, Pincelli M. Hull, 2019, Rapid ocean acidification and protracted Earth system recovery followed the end-Cretaceous Chicxulub impact. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Oct 2019, 201905989; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1905989116 https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/10/15/1905989116 Yours, Paul H.
  5. Otodus from the Aquia Formation, Maryland

    From the album Tertiary

    Otodus obliquus Mackerel Shark Tooth Paleocene Aquia Formation Douglas Point Charles Co., MD.
  6. From the album Tertiary

    Shark Vertebra Paleocene Aquia Formation Douglas Point Charles Co., MD.
  7. From the album Tertiary

    Crocodile scute Paleocene Aquia Formation Douglas Point Charles Co., MD.
  8. Argentina sphyraena Linnaeus, 1758

    From the album Vertebrates

    Argentina sphyraena Linnaeus, 1758 "lesser argentine" Late Paleocene to Early Eocene Fur Denmark Length 6cm
  9. My girlfriend, Valerie and I planned a two week trip to New Mexico and Colorado to visit friends, see scenery, and attend the Peach Festival in Palisades. Of course fossil collecting would be a part of it. I spent a full day with PFOOLEY outside Albuquerque in the Puerco Valley hunting ammonites in the Carlile Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale.
  10. Cast of Bivalve Shell from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Granocardium sp.? Cast of bivalve shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  11. From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Crenella cerica Cast of Tiny Bivalve Shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  12. From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Pecten whitfieldi Cast of tiny partial scallop shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  13. From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Deussseni sp.? Cast of partial gastropod Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  14. Trigonia from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Trigonia eufaulensis Cast of Bivalve Shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  15. Cast of Gastropod from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Gyrodes supraplicatus Cast of Gastropod Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  16. Cast of Oyster from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Pycnodonte convexa Cast of Oyster Shell Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  17. Pair of Cucullaea from the Pinna Layer

    From the album Just Above the Iridium Layer

    Cucullaea vulgaris Pair of Bivalve Casts Paleocene Pinna Layer Hornerstown Formation Manasquan River Basin Freehold, N.J.
  18. I will introduce this article by quoting the last sentence: "The place has been the site of fossil finds since the 1980s, and many of the discoveries - like this latest one - are made by dedicated amateur palaeontologists." LINK to article
  19. Croc Tooth?

  20. Pachygaleus tooth?

    Hey everyone, realizing right now that I haven't posted any fossils of my own in quite a while on the forum. Anyway, I found this tooth back in 2016 on my trip to the potomac river in maryland. It was found at purse state park which has exposures of the paleocene Aquia formation. When I first took a closer look at this tooth I was surprised to see that it had a shape which I had associated with Tiger sharks. I did some research online and found that Pachygaleus would be a match as they are present in that strata. It has been a while since that initial discovery but I wanted to confirm my idea on the forum. It's about .6 cm wide at the root and about .4 cm long. Thanks, PN
  21. So I was rooting again around in the garage and found a couple plates I had bought a few years back and never tracked down an ID for. Tentative provenance was Paleocene from Montana. I found this article recently and was wondering if it could be one of the genera/sp described or one of the other genera mentioned in the discussion section. Trapa, Trapago, Fortuna, Quereuxia. STOCKEY, R. A., AND G. W. ROTHWELL. 1997. The aquatic angiosperm Trapago angulata from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) St. Mary River Formation of southern Alberta. Int. J. Pl. Sci. 158: 83-94. Can be found here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/240563741_The_Aquatic_Angiosperm_Trapago_angulata_from_the_Upper_Cretaceous_Maastrichtian_St_Mary_River_Formation_of_Southern_Alberta I also was looking at the USGS pub 375 https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0375/report.pdf My plates have a number of leaflets and fragments with very little venation visible and in a pale gray and a light pink color in a very fine matrix.....Many of the leaflets have small teeth... Plates: Crenulations Leaflets and partial venation Anyone have any expertise in these? Looks like the authors were indicating more study is needed in this area of aquatic plants--that was 20 years ago. Any help is appreciated. Thanks! Regards, Chris
  22. Long ago, back in the late 1980s, I lived in British Columbia and had the opportunity to collect in the Late Cretaceous Nanaimo Group. I realized that many of the crabs and lobsters I was collecting were undescribed, so I made an effort to collect any material I came across. I tried to find a collaborator willing to help describe the material, but (for reasons I described elsewhere) that didn't work out, and I was encouraged to take on the writing myself. Since I had to focus on my own research career, which actually has nothing to do with paleontology, the project languished and over time most of the taxa were described independently by others, based on specimens collected by other people. Although I would have loved to contribute to the published record of the Nanaimo Group I became convinced that that would not happen. Then, about two years ago, I was corresponding with Torrey Nyborg (a fossil decapod expert well known to some Forum members @fossisle @MB @Al Dente) and found out that he was working on some new species of the crab genus Archaeopus from Vancouver Island and California. I sent him my material, one thing led to another, and the paper has just been published. I am very grateful that Torrey included me as a coauthor. I was also able to contribute the holotype of Archaeopus morenoensis (Figure 15 panel A, attached below), which is actually from California. So thanks to Torrey I feel my long-ago efforts paid off. Don
  23. Properca angusta AGASSIZ, 1843

  24. Nothing to crazy going on today. My wife found this piece of bone and she wants to know what it is. My initial thought is it was some random piece of croc but now that I’m looking at it closer I’m really unsure. Take a look tell me what you think
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