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Found 181 results

  1. Hello again fossil gurus! I went to per state park again today and found over 80 shark teeth and shark tooth fragments! It was really great. I also found these three little bits which I thought were intriguing, particularly the middle one. Is it a bone fragment!? I apologize for the picture with my hand, but it was the one that seem to catch the texture inside the best. Any ideas on what the others are? They were all found near the waters edge. Thanks so much!
  2. Alabama Paleocene Fish Tooth

    Once again I need help with an identification, this time a fish tooth, from the Upper Paleocene Bells Landing Member of the Tuscahoma Formation in Monroe County, Alabama. I apologize for the graininess of the photo, but I had to capture it with my iphone as my digital microscope provided no details or contrast of the tooth. I am hoping that one of the Aquia collectors might recognize it to perhaps genus. The most obvious feature is a central keel on one face of the tooth. Length of tooth is 6 mm. Mike
  3. Is this Enchodus?

    Believe this is enchodus?
  4. Hi, I bought this tooth last year and was wondering if anyone knew if it is authentic? It is about two inches long. TIA
  5. Alabama Shark Tooth help

    All In the process of looking through screened material from the Upper Paleocene Bells Landing Member of the Tuscahoma Formation, I came across this small 3 mm shark tooth. This deposit located within Monroe County, Alabama is equivalent in age to the Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Virginia. I searched the Aquia section on Elasmo.com but could not find anything similar. I don't know if this is a juvenile or an adult tooth but the most noticeable feature is the deep nutrient groove. I am hoping one of the many shark tooth experts here on the forum might be able to give some insight into what it is. Left: Lingual Right: Labial. Thanks Mike
  6. Went on a kayak trip on the Potomac for Father's Day with one of my kids. We spent a couple of hours around some paleocene spots. I found yet another lucky otodus right off the bat (sadly, one cusp missing). Between the two of us we then picked up a bunch of smaller teeth and a fair number of ray plates. We also got 3 croc teeth, including a nice fat one I found on my very last pass. I think we also got a small coprolite in there, but not 100% on that, and a chunk of turtle shell. All-in-all, not a half bad Father's Day trip!
  7. I took my kids yesterday for a quick hike out to Douglas Point to get some exercise and check out the Potomac. I wasn't expecting much because the tide was still pretty high and the water a bit muddy. But conditions were better than expected, so we were able to look around a bit. About 10 minutes in, I spotted a really nice little otodus in a submerged gravel line just below one of the bluffs. (Very tricky to see these guys, sometimes, against the dark sand.) It's in great condition and looks like it just came out of the bluff. We poked around as the tide went out for the next hour and came up with some more smaller teeth, some plates, and a few pieces of turtle shell, but nothing as nice as that first tooth. Anyway, it was a fun time and kept the kids busy for awhile! I was happy to find a decent tooth under tricky conditions. Enjoy the pics.
  8. Potomac - Fossil Wood? (Solved: Turtle)

    Hey guys- I was kayaking yesterday near Blue Banks and stopped for a rest and, of course, to see if there was anything interesting lying around. I picked up this piece of what I thought could be fossilized wood, but I'm not sure. It is definitely mineralized, has some very faint slightly radiating lines on the "top" and has a clear pore structure in cross section. Any ideas?
  9. Potomac River - Lucky Otodus

    I was out kayaking on a creek on the Virginia side of the Potomac today to do some birdwatching, but in an area I thought might have some Aquia exposure. I did come across one small bluff face, with maybe maybe 40 feet of narrow beach, that I stopped to check out. After about 2 minutes, I looked down and found this guy. My best Otodus so far and still razor sharp! I did find a few more much smaller teeth and a decent ray plate fragment, but nothing special the rest of the day. But this tooth--plus dozens of herons, ospreys, eagles, and purple martins, among other birds--made for an awesome trip. I hope you enjoy the pix .
  10. Maryland shark tooth

    Hi, I was wondering what these two shark teeth are. Any ideas? They were found in Maryland at purse state park.
  11. hunting the lower Potomac

    I took a trip to the lower Potomac 4/29/20. I found plenty of fossils including this 1 15/16" C. Auriculatus, a 1 7/8" Striotolamia striata, a 1 3/4" C. Megalodon, And a 3/4" crocodile vertebrae. The Auriculatus and the meg were pretty worn. But I found all of these fossils two hours, and a big tooth is a big tooth! I'm happy to take them either way. The croc vert was a bonus.
  12. Before quarantine took effect, I had a chance to visit Purse State park. I normally frequent Brownie Beach, but the recent cliff collapse forced me to try some other spots. I was also interested in finding some much older fossils from the Paleocene formations along the Potomac. I found tons of turritella gastropod molds, and many smaller lamnid teeth. Some of the larger ones I found were pretty easy to identify as Striatolamia species, most likely S. macrota that had slight surface wear from being washed around in the Potomac. Most teeth from this location seem to be similarly eroded, and almost all my S. macrota specimens seem to be missing their telltale crown striations. I found some nice looking ones I found, all approximately an inch in length and with a hint of blue coloring. Towards the end of the trip I also stumbled upon a likely pathological lateral tooth, probably another Striatolamia. It definitely caught my eye, and I really liked the weird curvature of the crown. This one was about half an inch in length, and although it might not be easy to tell from the photo, it had a much stubbier tip that was not the result of chipping or erosion. Anyways, I just thought I'd share an interesting find from last month since I'm losing my mind in quarantine. It sucks not being able to go on hunts when the weather is so nice, but I hope everyone is staying safe.
  13. Last Day on the Potomac River

    Hi everyone, My son and I were lucky enough to get out in the Potomac before Maryland and Virginia issued stay-at-home orders. Guess our hunting is on hold for the time being. It was a beautiful spring day. The wind kicked up late and kind of nullified low tide, but quite enjoyable anyway. I though I’d share a few pictures. I included a closer shot of 2 types of teeth we had not found there before. They look more like Miocene finds from the Calvert Cliffs area. I also included what I think is a vertebra and a few interesting teeth from a trip last week.
  14. Potomac Paleocene Finds

    Hello, my son and I had a great time on the shores of the Potomac River in Maryland, USA yesterday. Found some nice shark teeth and also a few objects that may or not not be fossils. We’re hoping you could help. These two pieces were associated with the Paleocene Aquia formation 56-59 million years old. Here are 4 pictures of each of the two objects. #1 #2
  15. Jaekelotodus or Paleohypotodus

    Curious to know the ID on these teeth. They were found some time ago in Maryland from a Paleocene location and both are about 3/4" long. I was initially thinking they might be Jaekelotodus robustus, but not 100% sure because Paleohypotodus rutoti looks a little similar. Unfortunately elasmo.com doesn't have any examples of Maryland specimens of J. robustus for comparison. Your thoughts?
  16. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  17. Potomac River Trip

    Made my second trip back to Douglas Point on Wednesday. The weather was sunny and a little over 60 degrees. It was a perfect 3+ hours of sifting and surface searching. I had the entire beach to myself. The only negative to the day was the 4 hour ride home. Usually takes me 3 hours. I was hoping to find my first croc tooth but I will not complain since I found a nice otodus. Otodus Obliquus
  18. We've had a couple nice hunts in the Aquia recently. Our first trip was really nice. The weather was beautiful and the tide was low. The only finds of note from this trip were two shark vertebrae and a small yet pristine transitional otodus. As always, we found over a 100 teeth in the gentle shallows. Our second trip was incredibly productive, albeit with fast moving water and a high tide on a beach ravaged by storms. We found what I think is a turtle washing out of a recent fall; I was unable to spot the rest of the turtle in the fall, however we were able to grab five pieces of material from the same spot,(within 6-7 feet of each other) and then find four more scattered along the beach. This trip was also very productive in terms of otodus, 3 in all from this same trip, although one was very badly damaged. Along with these larger beauties, innumerable teeth found their way into our hands and pockets. Is there any way that the turtle can be identified? Is it possible to refer to this turtle material as from the same turtle? ( We weren't finding any the first trip and then found a ton the second trip) @MarcoSr@sharkdoctor@WhodamanHD Thanks, FA The rikers mount contains finds from both trips. The largest fragment of turtle. Identifiable?
  19. Aquia Formation bone fragment

    Hi all, I found this chunk of bone at Purse State Park this November. It is from the Aquia Formation, which is of Paleocene Age. I was wondering if it could be identified to either crocodile or turtle, considering that these are the only two bony vertebrates that exist in large amounts in this formation. Or, of course, it could be nailed down to chunkosaurus status considering that it is relatively worn and isn’t very large. Thanks in advance!
  20. Hi guys I’ve found some stuff online that’s related to abbey wood but no full informative book, does anyone have any sources or book recommendations thanks
  21. A Cold Trip Down In The Aquia

    Today was our first trip to a hunting spot in the Aquia Formation. We had no idea what to expect from this location, but believe me, we were not disappointed. After three hours of walking the beach and sifting, we managed to leave (when the rain started) with some really nice pieces. I managed to grab what would have been a beauty of an Otodus except for the fact that it was snapped in half, some Ratfish material, one of the teeth i've been hunting after for a while, Jaekelotodus Robustus, a croc tooth, an angel shark, and a multitude of large Striolamnia Striata. MomAnonymous got not one, but four Jaekelotodus Robustus, a ray dermal scute, and the tip of a small fish jaw. Between the two of us we managed to collect between four-five hundred teeth in a three hour hunting period. Thanks for this one, @sharkdoctor
  22. hexapoda/mantoidae/Oise /Pseudomantoida

    New Paleogene mantises from the Oise amberand their evolutionary importance THOMAS SCHUBNEL and ANDRE NEL Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 64 (4): 779–786. schuNELinsemantilagersthexapoapp006282019.pdf @Coco @fifbrindacier
  23. What is this?

    Grandson found this in an outcrop of immature sandstone in the proximal fluvial facies of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in Park County, Montana. My current guess, based on the age of the outcrop and the depositional paleo-environment, is that it is a fossil plant, although it doesn't look much like one.
  24. Paleocene Dinosaurs

    So I was looking through some “older” papers and found this one by Rigby et al. (1987)(pdf attached). They were looking at some of the rock formations specifically members of the Hell Creek Formation. In one area, they have a lot of river deposits from before and after the K-T boundary. In one of the river deposits from the Paleocene as dated by pollen fossils, contains ungulate mammal fossils and some dinosaur teeth specifically ceratopsian and theropod teeth as far as I understood. They recognize that the dinosaur fossils could have been eroded from the bank and fallen in but the fossils aren’t weathered like they should have been and the river wasn’t the right kind that would rework sediments. I’m not sure I believe their arguments but what do you guys think? Rigby-et-al_1987_Paleocene-dinos.pdf
  25. A few pics from my 1st and only day at Purse State Park. I'm not really sure what I have here but would love to hear from you guys. I tried to group them with similar teeth but I'm sure I mixed a few. Sorry for no scale in the photos. I'll have to get a flat ruler for the future I guess. All teeth were between1/4" and 3/4" more or less. And I may have some of the same teeth in different pics. Thanks for looking. Andy
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