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Found 4 results

  1. old beetles record

    this being: Whirling in the late Permian: ancestral Gyrinidae show early radiation of beetles before Permian-Triassic mass extinction Evgeny V. Yan,1,2 Rolf G. Beutel,1 and John F. Lawrence3 BMC Evol Biol. 2018; 18: 33. Published online 2018 Mar 16. doi: 10.1186/s12862-018-1139-8 1,63 MB yanbeutelcoleopterentomollagersts12869-8.pdf
  2. Dear Friends, This time i'd like to show wonderful Snipe Fly, Blood Sucking Fly ( Rhagionidae ) from Eocene age. So perfect after that 40-54 million years. Closeup macro shot i made from 30 stacking photos. I hope in future i can get equipment for making 200-500 shots for focus stacking This fly is not super rare in Baltic amber but in that condition it is ( for that family ). Enjoy Artur
  3. a book review of: "The Fossils of Florissant" by Herbert W. Meyer. 2003. Smithsonian Books. 258 pages. Suggested retail $39.95 USD. For decades many paleontologists have been interested in the worldwide climatic cooling trend that started during the middle of the Eocene Epoch and perhaps ended with the last ice age of the Pleistocene. It was a trend interrupted by warming phases from time to time even among the ice ages. Close attention has been paid to fossil sites that can provide detailed evidence of changing climates and environments at pinpoints in geologic time across that transition. "The Fossils of Florissant" tells the story of a 34 million year-old (Late Eocene) land deposit in Colorado and for the first time documents its formally published plants and animals for a popular science audience. Named for a nearby town, the sediments are collectively known as the Florissant Formation and they have yielded a vast wealth of fossils in terms of both number and diversity. The Florissant Formation captures an evolving ecosystem that existed 30 million years after the last of the dinosaurs and less than 2 million years before another mass extinction would alter the paths of many lineages of organisms. The author, Herbert W. Meyer, is a paleontologist with the United States National Park Service. His specialty is Late Eocene-Early Oligocene plants. In 1995 he started building a database of all the known Florissant fossil specimens - those published in technical articles and numerous others stored in museums around the world. The chapters are unnumbered. After a short introduction, the first two chapters provide the historic and geologic setting for the site, recognizing researchers who have added to the understanding of the deposit over the past 130 years and reviewing the older rocks in the area as well as the events that led to the deposition of the Florissant Formation. The reader learns how a volcano was responsible for the very different yet equally-remarkable preservation of delicate insects and solid tree stumps. In the third chapter Meyer addresses several topics such as how scientists have assembled a reconstruction of the Late Eocene climate and environment at Florissant. He also discusses the unique mix of organisms and the scattered distribution of their modern relatives. To see how Florissant fits within the general Cenozoic cooling trend, Meyer compares it to an older formation in the region and two younger ones. He also looks at how Florissant has supplied valuable information regarding the co-evolution of insects and plants - how they have reacted to each other over millions of years. The fourth chapter reviews the plants of Florissant and they show quite a range - microscopic pollen grains, seeds, leaves, flowers, and giant tree stumps. The fifth chapter summarizes the long list of the known invertebrates, especially an incredible variety of insects, and the sixth covers the few vertebrate fossils found there. A two-page epilogue ends the story with observations on the ever-changing nature of our world. Two appendices offer bonus content for researchers. The first appendix provides a complete listing of all the fossil taxa as they were named as of the book's 2003 publication date. A continually-updated website (nps.gov/flfo) is also mentioned within a brief preview of the listing. The second appendix points out several museums with significant collections of Florissant fossils. Regarding the illustrations, the main goal of this book is not to be an identification guide for Florissant fossils but readers of all levels of experience will appreciate the generous number of excellent photos of many of the studied plants and animals. The captions that accompany the photos provide additional support for the text as well. A few nice maps and diagrams aid in the explanation of the geology of the deposit and site photos allow faraway readers to see the area today. "The Fossils of Florissant" is a fine example of a mainstream paleo-book that focuses on a highly-productive deposit and describes it clearly enough to impress its significance upon a layman with sufficient detail to be useful to students as well. Technical terms are used but they are defined early and employed within sentences of mostly everyday language. Even if a few fine points are missed, some readers might finish this book surprised at the familiarity of the plants and insects of 34 million years ago - a suddenly not-so-distant world halfway between us and the dinosaurs. Jess
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