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Found 3 results

  1. There are 8 species of paleoniscoids currently described from the Mazon Creek Deposit. While all are relatively rare, the vast majority can be identified as Elonichthys peltigeras and Elonichthys hypsilepus. The other six species are known from very few examples (sometimes only one or two). Almost all Mazon Creek paleoniscoids are juveniles but there are a few larger examples. There are also some isolated body parts of larger individuals. The fact that most Mazon fish are juveniles and often poorly preserved can make identification difficult. To compound the problem there needs to be much more work done as some species may be synonymous with fossils from other areas. The specimen that I am highlighting is an extremely rare species named Elonichthys remotus. At the time it was described (1987) it was known from a single fossil (possibly 2). This is the only other example that I am aware of. It has a rather distinct body when compared to the other Mazon paleoniscoids. The dorsal fin sits far back on the body and begins behind the pelvic fin. The body is also more elongated then other described species. It was collected at Pit 15 which is located a little further South then Pit 11.
  2. Possible Paleoniscoid Skull Roof

    Hi all, This specimen was found in a black shale layer that lays directly and uncomfortably upon the Duquesne Limestone, which is Late Pennsylvanian age. It was found in the suburbs of Pittsburgh. Both the shale and limestone are filled with vertebrate fossils, especially the scales, teeth and spines of paleoniscoid fish. As far as I know there is no species list from the shale but Elonichthys has been reported. I know skull roofs can be very diagnostic so any rough estimates of genus would be very helpful! I apologize for the picture quality, my phone is a brick.
  3. If you have ever collected fish from the classic vertebrate locality near Linton, Ohio or have obtained fish specimens from there, I would like to share some of what I have learned about the type of fish called paleoniscoids (also spelled palaeoniscoids) that occur there. Paleoniscoid fish have thick, rhomboidal scales made of dentine-type bone with a surface of hard enamel-like material called ganoin and on the external surface of the ganoin there are pits and fine canals. They resemble (body-wise) what most people think of commonly as a “fish-shape” except they have “armor-like” scales. They are set apart from the chondrichthyans (sharks), the dipnoans (lungfish) and the coelacanths, which also occur in the Linton cannel. The Linton paleoniscoids can be divided into two family groups, the elonichthyids (1 species) and the haplolepids (6 species). I’ve attached a pdf file called “1. Identifying Linton Paleoniscoid Fish” which describes the fishes for species identification. I tried to keep the terminology minimal, but to describe the differences some was necessary. To aid in identifying haplolepid species, I have put together an illustration called “Linton Haplolepids”. The accompanying jpegs show the illustration and most of the different paleoniscoid types. Because I no longer have any specimens (see pdf file: “2. My Linton Collection and Recollections”), I cannot provide photos of two of the species. I hope this information will be useful and bring about more interest in learning about and collecting in coal measure deposits wherever they occur. 1a Identifying Linton Paleoniscoid Fish.pdf 2 My Linton Collection and Recollections.pdf
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