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Found 230 results

  1. Calling Palebotanists!

    Ya know, I'm great at plant identification if it's currently growing in my region. Dive back to the Paleozoic and I can tell Calamites from Cordaites, but that's about my limit without a book in hand. So far, I've had 8 and I still don't know what this is! I'm pondering the frond-like object running diagonally across the center of the picture. It looks like a fruiting body from Cordaites, but it lacks the sporophyll. It also resembles Corynepteris angustissima, but the only illustration I can find lacks sufficient detail. This came from a mid-late Pennsylvanian Lewellyn Formation exposure in Columbia County, PA. It's about 4 inches (10cm) long.
  2. Here are some finds from a late August to early September long loop road trip, fossil hunting through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana and Kentucky. I'll appreciate detailed specimen identification help. First photo shows brachiopods & a trilobite from the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, northwestern Ohio.
  3. A bunch of fossils from Eifel

    Hello everyone! A bit ago traded some fossils with @Max-fossils and received some really cool stuff. I have only now gotten around to photographing them and would like to ask for your help with getting accurate IDs. These are all from the Givetian/ Eifelian of Eifel, Germany. I would appreciate any help with these IDs First some corals: 1. This piece was labelled as Favosites sp.
  4. Hey everyone. I thought I'd share some of the things I found on my last fossil hunt. So.. Many.. Fossils! One might even say that there were a plethora of fossils. If I could, I would've taken them all with me, but sadly my backpack can only carry so many rocks. I was literally examining each rock I had, trying to decide which to carry back and which to leave behind and how many I could fit in my pants pockets before they started to fall down. Eventually I decided to just stop looking for fossils and hike back to the jeep. This lasted all of 3 seconds before I found another a beautiful byrozoan and was trying to figure out how to fit it in my pack. The byrozoan and the sponge below are my favorites since i don't see many of them and the brachipod in the matrix just looks cool. lol Its fascinating to look at these fossils and think about how Arizona used to be completely underwater long, long ago.
  5. What do you think?

    Hey guys, I'm back with another ID question. The fossil I'm trying to identify is in the 1st picture. I think that what I have is a fossilized brachiopod WITHOUT the shell. What do you guys think? It's the same general shape, but the color and textures of this fossil look different than others I've found in the area. The symmetrical textured part in between the two humps, I've never seen before. Pictures 1,2, and 5 show the fossil in question and pictures 3 and 4 show examples of other brachiopods that I've found. The last picture is an example of a brachiopod that was broken in half, exposing the animal inside. (when I uploaded the post the pictures got out of order) So anyways, that's what I think I have but I'd really appreciate your thoughts on this. Ya'll have a lot more experience with these thing than I do so I welcome your opinions. Thanks!
  6. Hi, Recently acquired "Earth before the dinosaurs" book by Alain Beneteau. Published by Indiana University Press. Very comprehensive and well illustrated position. There are not too many books regarding paleozoic vertebrates. It gives good sense how the life looked like in the late paleozoic time. How much diversified early amphibians and mammals-like reptiles were. It is more a popular science book, but a good one. Tom
  7. Grandma's Brachiopod

    My grandmother (rest her soul) was a high school science teacher way back in the day. She was also a SERIOUS rockhound. These days her extensive collection of odds and ends lives in the family attic. I was going through some of the boxes when I stumbled on this gorgeous pyrite encrusted brachiopod. Unfortunately many of the tags and labels for her pieces haven't survived into the present day, so I've been curious about what species this is and where it might be from. I've heard that Ohio has a deposit with lots of pyrite fossils and brachiopods. Anyone know of any other places where such a fossil might have come from, or is Ohio the most likely?
  8. Lake Michigan Trace Fossil?

    Hi all, Is this a trace fossil, worm holes? If yes, that would be the first I've found. The holes measure about 1mm to 2mm in diameter. I think it's odd that all of the larger diameter holes are perfectly parallel to each other, while the smaller diameter holes seem to run perpendicular to the larger ones. Also, what are the dark thread-like shapes all over this rock. I've never seen those on my finds either. Rock measures 2cm tall, 1.5cm wide. Lake Michigan beach find, WI, this could be either ordovician, silurian or devonian. TIA! front: back bottom
  9. Orthoceras I

    Hi! A recent walk in the woods resulted in the discovery of this nautiloid. I found it in Wilson County, TN which is Ordovician. I am super excited about this because we found it in the woods on the property where I grew up, which means I probably walked past it a million times, and it's 3D so it shows the the siphuncle, and the outside of the phragmocone. We did not have anything to measure it with but I would estimate it to be about 12cm (5in). So my questions are these: I think first verify what I think this is and what I see as I am new to this. I have looked around the internet for genus/species of Orthoceras found in TN, but can't find anything, does anyone know? The fossil is covered with moss, what is the best way to clean it without breaking anything (once we drag this monster rock out of the woods and to the house)? Thank you so much for opinion/advice/help!
  10. Brachiopod ID help

    This fossil was found by an old friend of mine in maine, and I need some help with the ID on it. All i know is that it is from maine and that it is a brachiopod (the largest fossil present)
  11. As the title states, why do crinoids often show up alone as the sole type of fossil in an area? There's a quarry near my house I've been to a few times that has crinoid bearing marble. I've found a few crinoid stem pieces in rocks, but I don't really understand why they're the only type of fossil (unless you count chert.) The area is Permian-Devonian, so if crinoids fossilized shouldn't plenty of other common marine animals have fossilized too? Or am I thinking too narrowly and there's a good chance they DID fossilize and I simply have to look a little deeper? I'm not too knowledgable on the paleozoic so I appreciate any answers.
  12. brachiopod ID

    I found this beauty yesterday in a gravel in central Poland, so it's an ice age gift from Baltic Sea or Scandinavia, Ordovician or Silurian in age. Any ideas? I'm thinking... maybe a billingsellid of some sort? I'm not good at Palaeozoic brachiopods.
  13. A friend has a trilobite marked as Eoptychoparia piochensis from the Cambrian of Pioche, Nevada (Pioche Formation). I wasn't familiar with it and looked it up but couldn't find much info at all. Is that genus valid (maybe just rare)? I collected a couple of different spots out there about twenty years ago - didn't find much - and don't remember hearing about E. piochensis. Thanks, Jess
  14. I've had these few pieces in one of my drawers for years and I got looking at them again today. Three of them are clearly some form of Fusulinid or other Foram, the other I think is oolite. I don't remember where I got them but suffice it to say I didn't collect them myself. I guess I don't expect much info to come in about these, but in the off-chance that anyone recognizes the material I'd appreciate knowing about it. They each seem to be quite distinctive so there is hope. The only Fusulinid I know of in B.C. is Yabeina from the Cache Creek area (Marble Canyon), which I've read about in books about BC geology, but I've never collected at that spot so I wouldn't know how to recognize it, if any of my pieces are from there. Otherwise my best guess is they're from somewhere in the US where these things are more readily available.
  15. devonian(syn)ecology

    New data on the intergrowth of Rugosa-Bryozoa in the Lower Devonian of North Gondwana Yves PLUSQUELLEC ,Françoise P. BIGEY Carnets Geol. 19 (18) Creative Commons License DOI 10.4267/2042/70538 PDF LINK
  16. paleozoic malacology

    DBNA Middle and Upper Devonian Cryptodonta (Bivalvia)from the Pelagic Hercynian Facies -Taxonomy, Stratigraphy, and Paleoecology Judith Nagel Inaugural dissertation,2006 ABOUT 5,8 MB the research areas on a Devonian geodynamic reconstruction :
  17. HAMU Cameral deposits in Paleozoic cephalopods Harry Mutvei GFF, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1080/11035897.2018.1483966 4,7 MB category (qualitywise) :awesome* *certainly given author and source publication,but I'm aware there's personal prejudice involved in this judgment
  18. Help Identifying bivalve/Brachiopod

    Hello, I have been fossil hunting in Northeast Oklahoma near lake shores in an area where I have found bivalve, Bracheopod, and Crinoid fossils. I have been separating them into similar groups to identify them. May I get some help on this particular fossil type? Found in Northeast Oklahoma near the Lake Skiatook area. I am a newbie when it comes to fossil identification so I may be wrong on my tags.
  19. echinodermata/Diploporita:Prokopius

    1697_Paul_180820.pdf Prokopius, a new name for “Hippocystis sculptus”Prokop, 1965, and the status of the genus Hippocystis Bather, 1919 (Echinodermata; Diploporita) Christopher R.C. Paul . Bulletin of Geosciences 93(3), 337–346 (5 figures).
  20. NOhlMunneck Reconstructing time and diagenesis of limestone-marl alternations from the selective compaction of colonies of the tabulate coral Halysites Theresa Nohl & Axel Munnecke Bulletin of Geosciences 94(3), 279–298 size:about 21 MB recommended
  21. squid pro, quondam

    Anatomy and evolution of the first Coleoidea in the Carboniferous. Klug C, Landman NH, Fuchs D, Mapes RH, Pohle A, Guériau P, Reguer S, Hoffmann R Communications Biology,2019 Nature,31 july,2019 edit:about 9 MB I should be shot for that title here @Heteromorph @BobWill
  22. I am hoping someone can help me with this large unknown trilobite. It was given to me many years ago (late 1980s) by my father, along with some other trilobites and other fossils, as a Christmas gift. He acquired the fossils from a member of the local fossil club (Delaware Valley Paleontological Society) and most were carefully labeled, but this one was missing its label. It is a large, partially enrolled trilobite (15 cm from "nose" to tail if unrolled and 6.5 cm at the widest point); there are small bumps down the middle of the thorax and on the glabellum. It is on a chunk of matrix that lets it stand on its own, and it is a cool display piece. But looking at it closely, it looks...wrong. There's not much detail on the eyes (which seems to be usual in fakes, but can also mean a poorly-prepped real specimen) and overall it just looks wrong, in a way that I can't quite articulate (which again could mean fake, or badly-prepped but real). So, my questions are: 1. Is this, in your opinion, a real trilobite that was badly prepped, or a fake? I would appreciate if you can point out specific features that lead you to your decision. 2. If it is real, can you hazard a guess as to genus/species, and (this is a stretch) where it might come from? The scrape marks on the matrix resemble what I've seen on some Moroccan specimens. However, the other trilobites it was sold with are all from the United States, except for one from Pakistan (!), if that means anything. I think this trilobite resembles Calymene in general shape and size, but I don't know much about trilobites (if that wasn't already obvious) and I could easily be wrong. Thanks in advance for any help you can give. Let me know if additional photos would help- my photography isn't great, but I'll do the best I can.
  23. Paleozoic algal matting?

    While hiking through a desert area just southwest of Tucson, AZ. I found these interesting layered rocks. Over the course of an afternoon I came across a couple more spots where these types rocks were strewn over relatively large areas. Many of the pieces would fit inside a square inch or the palm of your hand, while many others were a few feet long/wide. I showed these to a local geologist and he called them stromatolithic Paleozoic limestone – evidence the area was once covered by water and these represent the layers of algae, probably in the form of algal matting that existed there, dating back to the Paleozoic time period. Respectfully, can anyone confirm or negate this idea? Thank you for your time and consideration!
  24. We split open this rock yesterday and it has a mirror image of two things I am not sure of. #1 I see some shell... #2 Vegetation?
  25. Niagara Escarpment

    Today I am up loading a favourite fossil oof mine, I like it because of the calcite quartz geode in what appears to be a brachiopod shell. I live on the Niagara Escarpment. At one time the area was sitting just below the Paleozoicequator, tilted at a more 45 degree angle, in a more east/west direction than the land sits now. This explains the weird road angles to me now, probably formed when the terrain dictated the road directions, but I digress. The Niagara escarpment in Ontario starts at the Niagara Falls, follows along the Lake Ontario Shore, through the cities of St. Catherines, Hamilton, and Dundas, where it takes a sharp turn north in the town of Milton, toward Georgian Bay. It follows along the shoreline of Georgian Bay through Collingwood (The Blue Mountains) across over to Owen Sound, along the shoreline of the west side (where I live) over to the town of Wiarton, up the Bruce Peninsula and carry’s on from there. Having written all that, I need to mention the Ojibwa an Anishinaabe people are the indigenous peoples here, who live with us. I have observed with many of the fossils I find are worn as if the waters were quite turbulent, probably from the heavy tidal action during this time. The moon was much closer to the earth some 430 million years ago, our days were approximately 19 hours long as the earth was spinning faster, and the moon was also spinning. The gravitational forces must have been unbelievable! (Dynamic, biological and anthropology concequences of lunar and angular radii, Steven A Balbus, published 08 August 2014. These are my thoughts today, please let me know what you think.
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