Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'paleozoic'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 100 results

  1. The Llanvirn of Argentina

    ART 5.pdf As far as I could ascertain,not posted before.If I'm wrong sincere apologies to the previous poster outtakes: once again the same thing happens the upload takes too long ,and it goes wrong. Is anybody else experiencing difficulties when posting in "documents"? Case of butterfingers on my part?
  2. Old news

    As far As I could ascertain, not posted yet edit: Amazing Czech Open-Access Pdf Library on this very forum Posted by Piranha in 2013 you live & learn Šnajdr M. (1983): Revision of the trilobite type material of I.Hawle and A. J. C. Corda, 1847 Sborník Národního muzea v Praze, řada B - Přírodní vědy 39 (3): 129. [PDF fulltext] NB 35, Mb or thereabouts TAXONOMY warning:This is from 1983,remember!!
  3. Patriaspirifer duodenaris (Hall 1843)

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Kashong exposure. Originally assigned to Delthyris, reassigned to Spirifer, Acrospirifer, and Patriaspirifer. Alternate spellings: P. duodenaris, P. duodenaria, P. duodenarius. Does not appear in Fossilworks or Wilson’s “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York”. Classification information from Fossilworks entry for Patriaspirifer genus. Reference: Linsley, D. M. Devonian Paleontology of New York. (1994) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology)
  4. I'm looking to add a specimen to Collections (my blastoid, seen at this link: LINK), and I'm hung up on Order and Family. My field guide gave me the genus and species, and Wikipedia gave me the Class, but I can't seem to find any sites online that routinely show Order and Family--except TFF's Collections, which doesn't (yet!) include any blastoids. Can anyone point me to a resource where I can find this info for a variety of Devonian and Ordovician fossils?
  5. Paleozoic fish tooth?

    I found this little tooth while going through some bulk sample from Jacksboro, TX, which is a Pennsylvanian area. I have found shark teeth there, but this looks more like a fish tooth. It reminds me of an Enchodus tooth, but I am not aware of any that were in the Paleozoic. Any ideas? The scale hash marks are 1mm. Thanks for any help.
  6. classical observations

    Thought it would be nice to post an oldie(1922)** yakowecolinteractgastropcrinoidZoolAnzc1922_0291-0294.pdf The author "leans towards" Simroth's theory that commensalism (and/ or mutualism)evolved from "parabiosis*",because the gastropod can sometimes be found attached to the crinoid stele . *apparently:the simple phenomenon of attachment,without connotations about causes or substrate preference . The frequent (obligatory,almost?)co-occurence of the fossils is explained by the life-long interaction itself: when the crinoid dies,the gastropod dies. (probable naticid gastropod boreholes can be found on some "infested" crinoids) The attachment scar of the gastropod are concentric,the gastropod aperture has an excentric location,to keep the aperture covering the anal aperture of the crinoid. The erosion/(resorption?) of the anal proboscis may be due to the gastopod Small circular depressions are tentativel attributed to early ontogenetic failed predation attempts by juvenile gastropod **and I am aware of the more recent literature on this subject havent read yet
  7. Hi all, I am looking to obtain some more brachiopods for in my collection, mostly because I think that it's a fascinating group of animals. Unfortunately, I do not have many of them. Therefore I'm asking the help of you all! This is what I want: Brachiopods (spiriferid or not) from any continent (preferably not from Europe) from the Paleozoic. I don't need a lot, just a few different ones to widen my collection! Having from many different locations would be nice too. I already have the following though, and as to avoid having duplicates I am not interested in these: Platystrophia from Maysville (KY, USA) Punctopsirifer from Beckenridge (TX, USA) Terebratula perforata from Kaloot (NL) Cyrtospirifer verneuilli from Barvaux-sur-Ourthe (BE) Atrypa reticularis from Eifel (DE) Cererithyris and Kallirhynchia from Lion-sur-Mer (FR) If you have one of those species (but from another location), I'm still interested! Or if you have other species but from the same location, same goes! What I don't want is to have the same species from the same location. In return, I have a selection of different (mainly) European fossils, ranging from shark teeth to seashells (and a few brachiopods ), and many other things. I also have several fossils from closed locations! If you're looking for anything specific yourself, then you can always ask me and I'll see what I have. If you're interested and have anything to propose, please send a PM! Thanks in advance! Max PS: for international shippers, make sure that the shipping costs to the Netherlands are not too high. I'm willing to ship to anywhere, but I just want to make sure that this is both ways! (No Track & Code needed; no signing needed; no priority needed; envelope is better)
  8. Crinoid (pyritized)

    This silvery gray crown of a fossil Crinoid is quite impressive for its vascular arrangement of arms and protruding aboral cup. However, it is the nature of its preservation that makes this piece very special. The fossil is pyritized as the metallic mineral Pyrite replaced the organic matter during mineralization.
  9. If you have ever collected fish from the classic vertebrate locality near Linton, Ohio or have obtained fish specimens from there, I would like to share some of what I have learned about the type of fish called paleoniscoids (also spelled palaeoniscoids) that occur there. Paleoniscoid fish have thick, rhomboidal scales made of dentine-type bone with a surface of hard enamel-like material called ganoin and on the external surface of the ganoin there are pits and fine canals. They resemble (body-wise) what most people think of commonly as a “fish-shape” except they have “armor-like” scales. They are set apart from the chondrichthyans (sharks), the dipnoans (lungfish) and the coelacanths, which also occur in the Linton cannel. The Linton paleoniscoids can be divided into two family groups, the elonichthyids (1 species) and the haplolepids (6 species). I’ve attached a pdf file called “1. Identifying Linton Paleoniscoid Fish” which describes the fishes for species identification. I tried to keep the terminology minimal, but to describe the differences some was necessary. To aid in identifying haplolepid species, I have put together an illustration called “Linton Haplolepids”. The accompanying jpegs show the illustration and most of the different paleoniscoid types. Because I no longer have any specimens (see pdf file: “2. My Linton Collection and Recollections”), I cannot provide photos of two of the species. I hope this information will be useful and bring about more interest in learning about and collecting in coal measure deposits wherever they occur. 1a Identifying Linton Paleoniscoid Fish.pdf 2 My Linton Collection and Recollections.pdf
  10. Beltzville Beauties!

    I made a gallery of this weekend's collecting adventure. Enjoy!
  11. Tabulate Coral

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Pleurodictyum americanum Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA Thank you to @fossildude19 for the ID!
  12. Trilobites!

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Trilobite segments found just below the water line in the lake at Beltzville State Park, PA Devonian Manhatango Formation
  13. IMG_1495.JPG

    From the album Beltzville State Park

  14. From the album Beltzville State Park

    Brachiopod internal mold with crinoid impression Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  15. Brachiopod

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Brachiopod Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  16. Bryozoan

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Bryozoan Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  17. Rugose Coral

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Solitary Rugose Coral Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  18. Crinoid Stem Pieces

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Crinoid Stem Pieces Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  19. Hash Plate

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Death Assemblage crinoids, brachiopod Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  20. Brachiopod

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Brachiopod Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  21. Rugose Coral

    From the album Beltzville State Park

    Rugose Coral Devonian Manhatango Formation Beltzville State Park, Beltzville, PA
  22. H.A.Nicholson on tabulata

    As is (almost) customary in the 19th century,some bryzoans are thrown in with the corals Pleurodictyum
  23. the Paleozoic of Canada

    here Yes,the taxonomy is/might be obsolete,but............... Let's see if I've done some people a favour here
  24. Fossils on a Pedestal

    There is a small road cut exposure I like to frequent in the Plattsburg fm. where the Hickory Creek shale is excavated at a relatively shallow angle. The whole formation it extremely fossiliferous, but specimens with great preservation require diligent and persistent searching. But, to the subject of this post, an interesting means of finding those great fossils is in timing a good rain with a day or two of drying and wind erosion. The shale is very loose and it seems that what happens is fossils (and of course 'just rocks') of certain weights and sizes hold their ground while the shale erodes away underneath them. I've affectionately, though probably not originally, coined them as being pedestaled. Here are a few recent examples: Orodus(?), Cladodont fragment, and Horn Coral
  25. The Carboniferous of the USA

    for those with catholic tastes in stratigraphy Do NOT expect pictorial exuberancy,it's more of a tabulation of lithologies and their stratigraphic interpretation than anything else
×