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Found 8 results

  1. Post Oak Creek - Oyster with Anomoly

    So I went to north Texas a few weeks back. Stopped by NSR and Post Oak Creek in Sherman. Both were pretty flooded still, which hampered my efforts. Had a very meagre haul, which was disappointing. Back in Houston, about a week later, I was going over my disappointing finds, after a good washing. That's when I noticed an oyster I picked up in Sherman had a rather unusual anomaly. It was odd that I even picked it up - I already have several nice oysters of this variety from the same location. I try not to take home too many duplicates, usually leave them for the next guy. Well, this was a surprise. And I would say made the whole trip worth it. Oyster and Sherman experts, tell me your thoughts. The anomaly appears spherical in shape, entirely back material, high gloss. I do not want to prep the object or to try to remove, as I feel it adds incredible charm to a rather ordinary fossil. Sherman, Texas. Eagle Ford Formation, Cretaceous.
  2. My friend found this in a creek bottom here in central Iowa. He thinks it might be a petrified pearl inside a half oyester. Any thoughts? Maybe the muscle?
  3. Greeting! I found this Pycnodonte yesterday in Monmouth County NJ (Cretaceous) with this strange growth on it (the bump). I compared it to about two dozen of my other Pycnodontes' and did not see anything similar so I was wondering if this was their version of a pearl or if it something else. As always, all help is greatly appreciated! -Frank
  4. Found this and wish it was a mystical ancient pearl, bet it is not. Any ideas? Thanks!
  5. Oyster oddity

    I would love to know what's in this oyster shell? Black pearl?
  6. Hey Gang, So yesterday I was going thru some Plio-Pleistocene shell bed debris in Sarasota Cnty, Florida and I ran across this tiny unknown. I was looking for darker items that stand out on the white sand/shell fragments, picking up very tiny shark teeth fragments and other small phosphatic pebbles and other small black unknowns. Its all of .5cm across, an irregular sphere shape, has small inconsistent pitting/dimpling over most of its surface. Note: I could have caused some of the pitting as I dropped it during cleaning on the concrete flr in my garage and it bounced around like a superball and ricocheted all over creation and somehow I still managed to find it). It also has a small distinct irregular depression on one side which you can see in the last photo. I thought maybe pearl but I just dont know anything about them and it seemed unlikely so maybe its even a manmade something or simply a really worn phosphate pebble. It has that deep black/dark gray color of dugong/whale bone--could it be a rounded polished bone fragment? The irregular pattern of the small dents/pitting is intriguing. Any thoughts are appreciated. Regards, Chris
  7. This is the first in a series of fossils from our Sept. 16 trip to an exposed 380 million year old Devonian site in the Mahantango Formation in Juniata County, PA (we'll do a trip report in the coming week or so). Most of our samples raised ID questions that we hope some of our friends and colleagues can help answer. The first two samples are what I call "pearly shells." This raises the issue of what can be learned from original shell material that is preserved? These first two samples are shells that have quite a bit of the original shell (white color) attached. Pearly Shell 1 - The best ID I can find online suggests that this is a brachiopod called Devonochonetes. The white shell is especially clear and well preserved. Pearly Shell 2 - Squalicorax identifies this as Tropidoleptus and I included a link to a paper that I found on this species. The shell on this specimen is much more "pearly white" than the photographs suggest - the color is actually bright, pearly white and the lighting/camera angle distorted the colors a bit. The shell is shiny and gleaming with a pearlescent quality and much whiter than it looks in the pictures. This shell bears some faint markings that may indicate the original pattern. Sometimes (but rarely of course) the original patterns show up in the fossil, or the original unmineralized shell material is preserved, which makes fossil shell collecting especially interesting. Here is some additional information on fossil shells that I recently found: There are two broad types of fossils - ones composed of the actual material the original creature was composed of, and ones where the original material has been replaced by some mineral after the original material completely decayed or dissolved (technically a "fossil" is the remains of an organism at least 10,000 years old. Some fossil shells are actual shells, even with the delicate aragonite material intact. Plain aragonite is chalky (think of the exterior of a clam shell). In a complex arrangement with calcite and protein (called nacre), aragonite takes on the mother-of-pearl appearance seen on the inside of mollusk shells. Aragonite is unstable over geologic time and inverts to calcite. [source: Various websites including: "Fossil Preservation" - http://www.csus.edu/indiv/k/kusnickj/Geology105/pres.html]
  8. Well, I don't know about it being worth thousands of pounds. Depends on what it might have mineralized to: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2178655/150-million-year-old-oyster-times-normal-size-probably-contains-worlds-biggest-pearl--wants-open-out.html
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