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Found 32 results

  1. Carboniferous Terrificous

    Here are some fossils I found in the town of St.clair in Schuylkill county , Pennsylvania. Llewellyn formation. 300 Mya. preserved in black shale.
  2. Pecopteris sp.

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Pecopteris sp. Found in 2019 at Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  3. I'm looking for opinions on this one..... I consulted a VERY old volume and found what I believe is a match... ESPECIALLY since the book's diagram was from my immediate area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania USA. This is from my Wednesday Feb. 21 hunt. The data on the fossil: Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. (From A Dictionary of the Fossils of Pennsylvania VOL II:) Pecopteris velutina. Les. Geol. Pa. 1858, p. 866, pll. 12, fig. 3, 3 a; 3.from Johnstown, Cambria Co., Pa., venation not visible under the thick skin; but in a specimen afterwards obtained at Cannelton, Beaver Co., Pa., also with a thick shining skin some of the leaflets show the style of venation.Lesq.—Kittanning coal. XIII. Pecopteris is a very common form genus of leaves. Most Pecopteris leaves and fronds are associated with the marattialean tree fern Psaronius. However, Pecopteris-type foliage also is borne on several filicalean ferns, and at least one seed fern. Pecopteris first appeared in the Devonian period, but flourished in the Carboniferous, especially the Pennsylvanian. Plants bearing these leaves became extinct in the Permian period. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: †Pecopteris Species: †velutina
  4. Carboniferous tree fern

    Two days ago I bought this nice fossil for a very convenient price at a local shop. Unfortunately, the seller could not remember key informations about this specimen, but he told me that it probably was Pecopteris and came from Germany. I want to identify it for a proper display alongside my other Carboniferous fossils, but I need again some help from a more experienced collector. In my opinion it is very similar, if not identical, to an other Acitheca (Pecopteris) polymorpha specimen I previously identified on an old topic thanks to this wonderful community. It may be the same plant, but I'm not sure. I am also skeptical about its German origin, is it reliable? Here is the upper side of the fossil: Pinnules detail from the other side (not exceptional quality, but I tried to make them more clear with a flashlight) Thanks in advance for your help!
  5. Multiple Plants A.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Multiple Plant Fossil - Neuropteris, Pecopteris, Annularia Plant, other leaves. *Two-sided fossil Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fossils on both sides of specimen. This fine specimen shows two leaflets of Calamites, a member of the Calamitales which belong to the Sphenophytes. Whorls of small leaflets are arranged concentrically around a thin stem and are called Annularia or Asterophyllites. Calamites itself is the name originally given to a stem section, but now applies to the entire plant. These were indicative of humid to wet habitats such as along rivers and lake shores. There appears to be small "branches" of calamites as well. Also on this piece, Neuropteris leaflets - they are usually blunt tipped and are attached by a single stem as opposed by the entire base, like Pecopteris. Also, Neuropteris has an overall heartshape. Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. Kingdom: Plantae
  6. Multiple Plants A.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Multiple Plant Fossil - Neuropteris, Pecopteris, Annularia Plant, other leaves. *Two-sided fossil Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fossils on both sides of specimen. This fine specimen shows two leaflets of Calamites, a member of the Calamitales which belong to the Sphenophytes. Whorls of small leaflets are arranged concentrically around a thin stem and are called Annularia or Asterophyllites. Calamites itself is the name originally given to a stem section, but now applies to the entire plant. These were indicative of humid to wet habitats such as along rivers and lake shores. There appears to be small "branches" of calamites as well. Also on this piece, Neuropteris leaflets - they are usually blunt tipped and are attached by a single stem as opposed by the entire base, like Pecopteris. Also, Neuropteris has an overall heartshape. Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. Kingdom: Plantae
  7. Pecopteris Fern in Nodule.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil Nodule Indiana, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous Period Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  8. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  9. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  10. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  11. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  12. Large Pecopteris sp. Section

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Large imprint of Pecopteris sp. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  13. Large Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Large Negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens. Found in 2017 at Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  14. In between all of the 4th of July weekend barbecues I was able to make it down to Cory's Lane, Rhode Island for a few hours of shale splitting. The day started out slow with only a few small plant imprints found, but I eventually managed to rip up a 5 foot slab of rock with a larger fern section on one end of it. After cutting the slab down to a little over a foot and a half in length this Pecopteris arborescens manages to go down as the largest fern I've found at this locality! It was a nice start to the long weekend, but the real win was the awesome weather .
  15. Pecopteris

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Small positive and negative imprint of a Pecopterid. Likely Pecopteris arborescens. Found in 2016 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  16. Pecopteris arborescens and Cyperites

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Positive and negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens pinnules and Cyperites. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  17. Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Positive and negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens. All that was left of the negative imprint was a small mid section of the fern. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  18. Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Large positive imprint of Pecopteris arborescens. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  19. Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens. Found in 2017 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  20. Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Positive and negative imprint of Pecopteris arborescens. Found in 2016 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  21. Pecopteris arborescens

    From the album Cory's Lane Fossil Locality

    Small positive imprint of Pecopteris arborescens pinnules. Found in 2016 at the Cory's Lane fossil locality, Rhode Island.
  22. fertile shoots,sporangia,it's all there a nov.comb.for the basionym Pecopteris Oregonensis Nicely illustrated,of course,or i wouldn't have posted it in the first place.
  23. Misidentified fern fossil?

    I purchased this fern fossil some years ago from a rock shop in Colorado. It was identified as a Neuropteris sp. from the Braidwood formation, Johnson County, Missouri, from the Pennsylvanian period. I have several questions. First, when I do a Google search I see quite a number of fern fossils being offered for sale with the same provenance. But when I dive deeper, I can't find a Braidwood formation listed for Johnson County, Missouri. Here is the USGS listing of geologic units in Johnson County, and I don't see a Braidwood formation listed: https://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/fips-unit.php?code=f29101. The only Braidwood I have found on Google is the Braidwood biota, part of the Mazon Creek fossil beds in Illinois. Has this been misidentified or am I missing something? Also, I'm not sure I can tell the difference between neuropteris and pecopteris species, can anyone give me a good identification? Thanks! 12X magnification: 25X magnification:
  24. Pecopteris and something else

    Hello everyone, I've some questions about this Pecopteris fossil (pic 1) from the Carboniferous of France. On the other side (pic 2) there are other leafs. Can you help me identifying them ? Thank you
  25. Pecopteris

    From the album My Collection

    Here is the negative and positive imprint of a Pennsylvanian aged fern that I found. This fossil belongs to the Pecopteris genus. Found at Corys Lane, Rhode Island.
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