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Found 23 results

  1. Pelecypod identification

    Hi, I believe this is a pelecypod. It was found in an early Pennsylvanian formation sandstone hash plate. Specimen is 3" overall. Would anyone have some thoughts to which superfamily, genus, etc., so I can dig a little deeper on my own? Thank you, Kato
  2. Pelecypod ID

    I am trying to make it a habit to ID and label my finds much better than I used to. So I ask for help on these "lowly clams". I have tried to identify these 2 different pelecypods found on a trip back from Ohio at Thanksgiving. But my research is not proving fruitful. One specimen is very thin, the other broad based. They were found in a roadcut on Hwy 20 in NW Illinois in a very narrow (12 inch) band of rock, almost like hardened mud. This band was full of pelecypods but nothing else.. It likely was from the Galena formation of the Ordovician. I have found Ambonychia (Cincinnatian)as a similar pelecypod but one seems too thin, the other seems too wide. Any clam experts???
  3. Pelecypod?

    Found this pretty little fossil in some Mahantango Formation rocks, and it was by itself and Three D, unusual for the site. Any ideas on the species? Givetian, mid-Devonian, Washington county, MD, Mahantango Formation. Any ideas? A post on the trip I found this from to come...
  4. Hello Gang. I'm not sure if fossiling takes your focus off what you should be doing like it does me but yesterday I was supposed to be clearing an area out to make space for an upcoming wood working project. Well that exercise turned more into opening boxes and looking at fossils stored there and reliving why I had brought some of them home. It was a good thing and a bad thing! As many of you know the Tamiami formation has a boat load of invertebrate species and its fairly easy to acquire a bunch of material quickly so here are several shots to share with you all of some of the variants I've brought home over the past several years---Sarasota County, Plio-Pleistocene. There are occasionally also some pretty nice shark teeth that you can run across in the various spoil finds. Here are several of the common types I've found..Mako, Tiger, Meg and Carcharhinus sp. types... There are a number of barnacles and I'm fascinated by the different types but its the associated attachments that they are found on that really gets my eye. I believe here's a Ceratoconcha sp. group that has latched on to a good sized bone fragment and a Chesaconcavus sp. on a coral branch. I've picked up lots of damaged shells and here are two gastropods with showing what I believe are some type of shell repair. The larger one somehow survived the massive damage..I've read about how crabs have sometimes inflicted these wounds so if thats the case the crab must have been fairly good sized one. The smaller guy has some small damage near the tip of the spire and along the aperature. I'm intrigued by just general shapes and coloration differences so here's a few examples of some gastropods Neverita sp. and Chesapecten sp. that came home. The last shot is my favorite from the day...a Vasum (Hystrivasum) that has sponge boring damage, a good sized Balanus sp. growing on the spire and if you look close you can see small boring clams still in their bore holes on the top left of the specimen just beneath the barnacle. All for now. Hope you enjoy. Back to woodworking! LOL. Continued hunting success to you all! Regards, Chris
  5. Get a load of this Bivalve!!! I used to find a few of these back in the day. These come from a very private property that was located in the Falore formation in Northern california. I was lucky enough to be privy for collecting. No more of these will ever be collected. Sad. But what a super cool mussel shell!!! And quite HUGE!!! RB
  6. Ostrea sp.

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Oyster found 2016 Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware
  7. Ostrea sp.

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Oyster Found 2016 Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware Based on "The Cretaceous Fossils of New Jersey" by Horace G. Richards, et al, 1962.
  8. Ostrea mesenterica

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Oyster Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware Based on "The Cretaceous Fossils of New Jersey" by Horace G. Richards, et al, 1962.
  9. Ostrea Tecticosta

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Oyster Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware Based on "The Cretaceous Fossils of New Jersey" by Horace G. Richards, et al, 1962.
  10. Common find, looking for name

    I have dozens of these things. They are all over the spoils pile. Maybe I've been staring at my books too long, but for the life of me I can't find a name. This should be an easy one. Cretaceous pelecypod form the C and D Canal, Mt Laurel formation, Delaware
  11. Ostrea what???

    Okay, here's a stumped for the detail-oriented. The first picture is Ostrea falcata, one of the more common finds in the Mount Laurel Formation. It is curved like a hook, with ruffles radiating out from the hinge. The second one is O. panda. (same size, left out the penny.) It's more or less circular, with ruffles only at the edgesThe other two are from the same spot at the same site, on the same day, but are clearly not the same species. The third one is rather fan-shaped. the fourth has a depression dividing the raised center from the the ruffled edge. I can't find them in my DE or NJ field guides. Web search turned up nothing. Anyone recognize them?
  12. Anisomyon jessupi

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware Based on "Cretaceous Fossils from the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal: A Guide for Students and Collectors" by Edward M. Lauginiger
  13. Ostrea falcata

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Late Cretaceous Oyster Reedy Point (North Side) Spoils Pile MT Laurel Formation Delaware City, Delaware Based on "Cretaceous Fossils from the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal: A Guide for Students and Collectors" by Edward M. Lauginiger
  14. Texas Cretaceous clam

    Collected this in Plano, Texas when I was a kid back in the early 1980s. Construction equipment had dug up some limestone and piled it next to the road. There were a lot of broken Inoceramus shells, this was the only intact fossil that I found. Looks different than Inoceramus. Does anyone know what species this would be. I have never found another like it. Measures 2 3/8 inches across.
  15. A Day in the Shale

    Got out yesterday to some exposures of shale in Southwestern Ohio. Found a couple nice trilobites; Isotelus and Flexicalymene. A couple nice Isotelus pygidium. I got heavy into some pelecypods and a couple nice brachiopods were laying in the stream, one with a nice bryozoan on top.
  16. Texigryphaea graysonana

    Collected near Lake Texoma in Grayson County, Texas.
  17. Possible Inoceramus?

    I was wondering if someone familiar with Eagle Ford fossils from the Las Colinas, Texas area could identify this. I think it looks like Inoceramus, but am not sure. For size reference, the graph paper that it is sitting on is 1/4" grid.
  18. Caryatis veta 3

    From the album Eocene Bivalves of New Jersey

    Caryatis veta Manasquan Formation Eocene Monmouth County
  19. Caryatis veta 1

    From the album Eocene Bivalves of New Jersey

    Derived from the Eocene Manasquan Formation from Monmouth County, New Jersey. The far right specimen is the largest in my collection and does have a slightly different form as well as a different preservation. This is one of the more common species from this unit and locality.
  20. Caryatis veta 2

    From the album Eocene Bivalves of New Jersey

    Derived from the Eocene Manasquan Formation from Monmouth County, New Jersey. The far right specimen is the largest in my collection and does have a slightly different form as well as a different preservation.
  21. Caryatis veta 4

    From the album Eocene Bivalves of New Jersey

    Close up of the middle specimen. Derived from the Eocene Manasquan Formation from Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  22. Caryatis veta 5

    From the album Eocene Bivalves of New Jersey

    Close up of the middle specimen. Derived from the Eocene Manasquan Formation from Monmouth County, New Jersey.
  23. Oyster - Paleocene Aquia Fm Maryland

    ID help needed. I found this well-preserved, ornate, large oyster in Maryland's Paleocene Aquia Formation. Is this the common Ostrea compressirostra? The lower valve's outer surface is quite ornamented, with radial folding along the protruding thin edges of the concentric growth rings (see pics). The valve margins are slightly discordant. The adductor muscle scar impressions, on both valves, contains what appears to be a thin layer of non-calcareous fossilized tissue. Specimen dimensions: Weight: 36 ounces Lower valve: height 6.75 inches, length 6.75 inches, convexity 1.5 inches Upper valve: height 5.75 inches, length 5.5 inches, flat Thanks for your help.
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