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Found 186 results

  1. Fern non det.

    From the album Plants

    Fern non det. Upper Carboniferous Llewellyn Formation St. Clair Pennsylvania USA
  2. Fern non det.

    From the album Plants

    Fern non det. Upper Carboniferous Llewellyn Formation St. Clair Pennsylvania USA
  3. Fossils? Help Appreciated!

    Hi everyone! I’m not a collector or even a hobbiest (yet!) but I came across this forum looking for a way to start learning and to help me ID some interesting things I found the other day. I was walking with my dog in Cranberry Township PA (20miles north of Pittsburgh) and noticed a number of darker, reddish, oddly shaped stones that stood out against the hillside of crumbled gray shale that had been pulled out (possibly from as far as 50 feet down or so) in digging a drainage pit for a new development. Most of what I saw just looked like concretions formed around river stones or something like that (some were split in half so they almost resembled clams) but in one area there were pieces that looked different, some with fairly conspicuous tooth or bonelike shapes. I rinsed mud off of them with warm water and started scrubbing a bit with a brush but I noticed that the lightest areas on a couple pieces are fairly soft (I can scrape them with my fingernail) so I thought I'd better stop until I figured out what was what. I don’t really know anything about this stuff yet, but I loved looking for ferns, etc and even found a trilobyte once as a kid and so I was kinda thrilled to have maybe found something interesting. Of course, they could just be a pile of neat rocks too, haha... So what do you think I have here? Just organic looking concretions or something cooler? Thanks! (note: I embedded the images instead of directly attaching them, so if you click on them you'll be able to see higher-resolution versions)
  4. Conodont?

  5. Partial Thoracic Skeleton

    There is excavation for a housing development behind our home. On examination of some large excavated limestone boulders, I noticed what appeared to be a cross-section of thoracic (rib cage) of a skeleton. I suspect it is a fossil, being that there is a noticeable pattern within the same layer of sedimentary rock. I've attached a picture, please note the rust colored protrusions within the blue-gray limestone boulder. Thank you for any input on whether my suspicions are reasonable. If so, I intend to contact the construction company as to the location of where the boulder was excavated, and whether they are agreeable to removing it from construction use.
  6. TREE SECTION A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Unknown tree section SITE LOCATION: Shaffer Mountain, near Central City, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian (299-323 Million Years ago) This is in sandstone; some of the rocks in the area were glacial - this one is local rock. The tree type is unknown, but it may be Sigillaria or Lepidodendron, there are trace designs on the piece. Kingdom: Plantae
  7. TREE SECTION A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Unknown tree section SITE LOCATION: Shaffer Mountain, near Central City, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian (299-323 Million Years ago) This is in sandstone; some of the rocks in the area were glacial - this one is local rock. The tree type is unknown, but it may be Sigillaria or Lepidodendron, there are trace designs on the piece. Kingdom: Plantae
  8. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  9. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  10. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  11. Pecopteris 000.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossil From Pleasantville Mountain, Somerset Co., Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - Carboniferous (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  12. Odd clumps

    These may be nothing, but as I have gone around fossil hunting I will often see little clumps like this. The gray one is from Finish Shale in Jack County. The other is from SE Johnson county Texas in a limestone looking formation that may be either Ft Worth or Duck Creek, but I think Ft. Worth is more likely. They often have these little hollows in them as if some animal made a burrow out of them. They seem to be comprised of bits and pieces of shells and tiny pebbles and mud. I think I’ve seen modern crabs make burrows of tiny things with mud mixed in. I find it hard to believe those little burrow structures would survive through the ages, but I’m curious if anyone knows what they are. These have crumbled quite a bit.
  13. Rib bone? Iron fence?

    The metal detector found this piece, there is more that we couldn't get dislodged from a root running through the ground where we were prompted to dig. We thought it was likely part of an old iron fence or wheel, but after washing the dirt off we aren't so sure. It's got a little weight to it, but seems like it might be part of a rib cage, from what creature in what era we haven't a clue. We were, as usual, digging by the creek under the bridge at the foot of the cliffs in Carversville, Pa, with a metal detector that we were using for the first time. Between our proximity to the bridge and it being our first time out with the detector, I'm not confident that it was these pieces setting off the machine. We are going back to dig up the rest of the pieces in the morning so will post more pics tomorrow if needed for further clarity.
  14. Unknown marine fossil form

    I have no clue what this is. It appears to have been crushed. I’m hoping that maybe the surface texture in pic #1 will help some. I found it out at Lost Creek Dam. The last shot looks like it could possible be nautaloid, but my amiture Eye doesn’t see any texture or other characteristics to support that.
  15. Lost Creek Dam tooth 2

    I found this out at the Lost Creek Dam site near Jacksboro, Texas. I think it’s a tooth. It’s very small. Just over 2 cm tall, but the tooth part is about 1 cm. Can anyone tell me what it is from?
  16. Lost Creek Dam tooth

    I found this out at the Lost Creek Dam site near Jacksboro, Texas. I think it’s a tooth. It’s very small. Just over 1 cm long. Can anyone tell me what it is from?
  17. Brachiopod IDs from Jack county, TX

    I found these today in Jack county, TX not far from the Wise county border. I’m not sure what the formation is there, but I think it could be either Jasper Creek or Alluvium. I don’t know much about the Alluvium, which is Cenozoic, Quaternary. I’m not sure I’ve ever hunted in the Cenozoic so I’m not sure what would characterize it. I’m learning though. I’d say the material resembled Pensylvania. Pic 1 & 2 are side the 2 sides I’m guessing that pic 1 is the dorsal valve side (there’s a convex vertical part running down the middle of the shell). # 2 is the pedical valve side and there’s a concave vertical part running down the middle of the shell. But I could be wrong on which is which.
  18. Mineral or fossil?

    I found this out at Mineral Wells. I think it is a mineralization pattern, but I wanted to see if anyone else had any insight or could confirm that to be the case. Most everything I have found has been crinoids or sea shell in nature. If it is fossil it doesn't really match with anything else I have found there. The other sides are just yellow to cream colored stone.
  19. Chew on this... please.

    I thought these were horse teeth, but after some poking around I'm thinking they're bison teeth. Please, help with identification and geological era. I'm starting with photos of the two that look like bone, in what stage I don't know, but do have three more (one large and two small) that I believe to be completely fossilized teeth from the same animal. All were found in Bucks County, Carversville exactly, in or near a creek bed at the bottom of a ridge of cliffs, which, we've been told, is a very special geological location where finds are not typical of the surrounding area. Because I could not wait to get another photo with a point of reference for size, I must include my best estimation from memory: the larger piece is approximately 2" long and 1/2-3/4" deep and not quite 1 1/2" wide The smaller of the two pieces can be referenced by the larger, but is about the size of my index finger from the first knuckle to top. I'll wait to post the photos of the possible complete fossilized pieces, I'm sure I will need to be more diligent including all needed info in the photos I choose to post. For now, I hope this is enough, do tell!
  20. Camptostroma roddyi

    From the album Echinoderm Collection

    Camptostroma roddyi (Hundt, 1939). Kinzer formation, Bonnia-Olenellus Zone, early Cambrian. Found in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, US. Bought as Ebay purchase. This animal is about 4cm in diametre. An early Cambrian echinoderm that is called a stem echinoderm as it is said that many types of echinoderms arose from this animal. This species is the only animal in the family of its own, Camptostromatoidea.
  21. Can anyone I'd this fossil

    Anyone know what this is. I found it along Swatera Creak in Central Pennsylvania.
  22. My daughter and I spent the summer fossil hunting in the Mid-Atlantic. To cap it off, we shared our finds at the local library. There are a few things in there that we did not actually collect this year, but are nicer specimens from previous years of the species we found this year. All of two pieces we actually purchased. The rest was just lying on the ground somewhere this year!
  23. What is this?

    Found In Raubsville PA
  24. More from Montour trip

    My 6 year old son and I found lots of fossils just looking through the rubble on the surface yesterday during our first ever trip to the site yesterday. We've identified many of the bivalves we found, and found both crinoid stem cross sections and profiles. We're stumped by a few, however, and would like some help.
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