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Found 87 results

  1. Plant ID needed from Kentucky

    Hello everyone, I have a small collection that I picked up on a trip to Kentucky...the area around hazard. I think its the Breathitt formation. Pennsylvanian period. I have been in the process of Identifying them. I think I have a decent lock on some of them, but could use a little help on a few. I should add some more photos of 3 and 4. Let me know if you need anything specific (close up on a certain area, or what have you).
  2. Essexella asherae Jellyfish fossils.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Essexella asherae Jellyfish fossils Francis Creek Shale, Mazon Creek, Illinois Pennsylvanian Period (323.2-298.9 million years ago ) Essexella is an extinct genus of scyphozoan jellyfish known from Late Carboniferous fossils containing the species Essexella asherae. See list of prehistoric medusozoans. It is one of the most recurrent organisms in the Mazon Creek fossil beds of Illinois. In the Essex biota of Mazon Creek, it consists of 42% of all fossil finds. Its behavior is speculated to be similar to that of modern-day jellyfish. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Scyphozoa Order: Rhizostomeae Family: Rhizostomatidae Genus: †Essexella Species: †asherae
  3. Rugose Coral - Kansas 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose "Horn" Coral Kansas, USA Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 - 298.9 million years ago) The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  4. Rugose Coral - Kansas 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose "Horn" Coral Kansas, USA Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 - 298.9 million years ago) The Rugosa, also called the Tetracorallia, are an extinct order of solitary and colonial corals that were abundant in Middle Ordovician to Late Permian seas. Solitary rugosans (e.g., Caninia, Lophophyllidium, Neozaphrentis, Streptelasma) are often referred to as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled, or rugose, wall. Some solitary rugosans reached nearly a meter in length. However, some species of rugose corals could form large colonies (e.g., Lithostrotion). When radiating septa were present, they were usually in multiples of four, hence Tetracoralla in contrast to modern Hexacoralla, colonial polyps generally with sixfold symmetry. Rugose corals have a skeleton made of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals (Scleractinia), rugose corals were invariably benthic, living on the sea floor or in a reef-framework. Some symbiotic rugose corals were endobionts of Stromatoporoidea, especially in the Silurian period. Rugose corals will also always have a columella, an axial rod which supports the septa running up the center of the corallite. It is present in rugose corals because they were mainly solitary and so required the extra support. Tabulate corals have no columella because they were always colonial and relied on the support of neighboring corallites. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  5. Cyclus americanus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cyclus americanus Crustacean Francis Creek formation of Illinois Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Cyclida (formerly Cycloidea, and so sometimes known as cycloids) is an order of fossil arthropods that lived from the Carboniferous to the Cretaceous. Their classification is uncertain, but they are generally treated as a group of maxillopod crustaceans. Cycloids have a "striking" resemblance to crabs, and are thought to have inhabited a similar ecological niche, and to have been driven to extinction when crabs became widespread and diverse. The largest members are over 6 centimetres (2.4 in) across the carapace. Their gills are often preserved in three dimensions, and do not resemble those of other crustaceans. Cycloid taxa differ in the number of walking legs, in the form of the mouthparts and in other significant ways. This specimen measures approximately 1/2" across with the concretion measuring 1 1/2" across. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Subphylum: Crustacea Class: Maxillopoda Subclass: Branchiura Order: †Cycloidea Family: †Cyclidae Genus: †Cyclus Species: †americanus
  6. Cyclus americanus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cyclus americanus Crustacean Francis Creek formation of Illinois Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Cyclida (formerly Cycloidea, and so sometimes known as cycloids) is an order of fossil arthropods that lived from the Carboniferous to the Cretaceous. Their classification is uncertain, but they are generally treated as a group of maxillopod crustaceans. Cycloids have a "striking" resemblance to crabs, and are thought to have inhabited a similar ecological niche, and to have been driven to extinction when crabs became widespread and diverse. The largest members are over 6 centimetres (2.4 in) across the carapace. Their gills are often preserved in three dimensions, and do not resemble those of other crustaceans. Cycloid taxa differ in the number of walking legs, in the form of the mouthparts and in other significant ways. This specimen measures approximately 1/2" across with the concretion measuring 1 1/2" across. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Subphylum: Crustacea Class: Maxillopoda Subclass: Branchiura Order: †Cycloidea Family: †Cyclidae Genus: †Cyclus Species: †americanus
  7. Cyclus americanus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cyclus americanus Crustacean Francis Creek formation of Illinois Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 -298.9 million years ago) Cyclida (formerly Cycloidea, and so sometimes known as cycloids) is an order of fossil arthropods that lived from the Carboniferous to the Cretaceous. Their classification is uncertain, but they are generally treated as a group of maxillopod crustaceans. Cycloids have a "striking" resemblance to crabs, and are thought to have inhabited a similar ecological niche, and to have been driven to extinction when crabs became widespread and diverse. The largest members are over 6 centimetres (2.4 in) across the carapace. Their gills are often preserved in three dimensions, and do not resemble those of other crustaceans. Cycloid taxa differ in the number of walking legs, in the form of the mouthparts and in other significant ways. This specimen measures approximately 1/2" across with the concretion measuring 1 1/2" across. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Subphylum: Crustacea Class: Maxillopoda Subclass: Branchiura Order: †Cycloidea Family: †Cyclidae Genus: †Cyclus Species: †americanus
  8. Crinoid Stem Piece - Kansas 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stem Piece - Kansas Kansas, USA Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 - 298.9 million years ago) Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  9. Crinoid Stem Piece - Kansas 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stem Piece - Kansas Kansas, USA Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 - 298.9 million years ago) Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  10. Odontopteris bradleyi 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontopteris bradleyi Fossil Bonner Springs Shale, Parkville, Missouri Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Odontopteris: a genus of fossil seed ferns found in the coal measures of the Carboniferous that have pinnatifid fronds with indistinct midribs and veins not forming a network. The genus Odontopteris, in the Stephanian still abundantly present, had declined strongly in the Permian. Schizaeaceae is a family of plants with three subfamilies, Anemioideae, Lygodioideae and Schizaeoideae (sometimes treated as families), with a total of four genera and about 190 species. They are mainly distributed in the tropics, but several species are found in temperate regions in North America, South Africa, Australasia and Northeast Asia. The family is united in that the sporangia are borne on specialised pinnae, distinct from ordinary vegetative pinnae. The pinnae form small comb-like, pinnate structures on which the sporangia are formed. This Odontopteris bradleyi measures 1 1/2" long and is on a matrix measuring 1 1/4" by 1 1/2". Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Gymnospermophyta Class: Filicopsida Order: Polypodiales Family: Schizaeaceae Subfamily: Schizaeoideae Genus: Odontopteris Species: bradleyi
  11. Round Artisia 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Artisia fossil South Fork, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Artisia - the pith cast of Cordaites. In The Fossil Flora of Great Britain, or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country - John Lindley, Wlliam Hutton, Volume III, 1837 were described similar ones as Sternbergia. Sternbergia angulosa Artis Antedil. phytol. t. 8. and Sternbergia approximata Ad. Brongn. Prodr. p. 137. " When the integuaient of coal is broken off, these plants are sometimes found simply marked by horizontal depressed lines, which meet alternately from opposite sides anastomozing in the middle ; but in other cases the space between the lines is excavated into deep furrows, and honey-combed as it were by the formation of short perpendicular bars which connect the lines ; traces also may be found of lines running along the sides of the stem for a considerable distance. The result of this is that many stems appear as if they were composed of horizontal plates, about l-16th of an inch apart and held together by some connection in the axis of the stem : a most extraordinary appearance, to which we know of no parallel, and which we are by no means prepared to say is their real structure. " Cordaites is an important genus of extinct gymnosperms which grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites
  12. Round Artisia 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Artisia fossil South Fork, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Artisia - the pith cast of Cordaites. In The Fossil Flora of Great Britain, or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country - John Lindley, Wlliam Hutton, Volume III, 1837 were described similar ones as Sternbergia. Sternbergia angulosa Artis Antedil. phytol. t. 8. and Sternbergia approximata Ad. Brongn. Prodr. p. 137. " When the integuaient of coal is broken off, these plants are sometimes found simply marked by horizontal depressed lines, which meet alternately from opposite sides anastomozing in the middle ; but in other cases the space between the lines is excavated into deep furrows, and honey-combed as it were by the formation of short perpendicular bars which connect the lines ; traces also may be found of lines running along the sides of the stem for a considerable distance. The result of this is that many stems appear as if they were composed of horizontal plates, about l-16th of an inch apart and held together by some connection in the axis of the stem : a most extraordinary appearance, to which we know of no parallel, and which we are by no means prepared to say is their real structure. " Cordaites is an important genus of extinct gymnosperms which grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites
  13. Round Artisia 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Artisia fossil South Fork, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Artisia - the pith cast of Cordaites. In The Fossil Flora of Great Britain, or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country - John Lindley, Wlliam Hutton, Volume III, 1837 were described similar ones as Sternbergia. Sternbergia angulosa Artis Antedil. phytol. t. 8. and Sternbergia approximata Ad. Brongn. Prodr. p. 137. " When the integuaient of coal is broken off, these plants are sometimes found simply marked by horizontal depressed lines, which meet alternately from opposite sides anastomozing in the middle ; but in other cases the space between the lines is excavated into deep furrows, and honey-combed as it were by the formation of short perpendicular bars which connect the lines ; traces also may be found of lines running along the sides of the stem for a considerable distance. The result of this is that many stems appear as if they were composed of horizontal plates, about l-16th of an inch apart and held together by some connection in the axis of the stem : a most extraordinary appearance, to which we know of no parallel, and which we are by no means prepared to say is their real structure. " Cordaites is an important genus of extinct gymnosperms which grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites
  14. Round Artisia 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Artisia fossil South Fork, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Artisia - the pith cast of Cordaites. In The Fossil Flora of Great Britain, or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country - John Lindley, Wlliam Hutton, Volume III, 1837 were described similar ones as Sternbergia. Sternbergia angulosa Artis Antedil. phytol. t. 8. and Sternbergia approximata Ad. Brongn. Prodr. p. 137. " When the integuaient of coal is broken off, these plants are sometimes found simply marked by horizontal depressed lines, which meet alternately from opposite sides anastomozing in the middle ; but in other cases the space between the lines is excavated into deep furrows, and honey-combed as it were by the formation of short perpendicular bars which connect the lines ; traces also may be found of lines running along the sides of the stem for a considerable distance. The result of this is that many stems appear as if they were composed of horizontal plates, about l-16th of an inch apart and held together by some connection in the axis of the stem : a most extraordinary appearance, to which we know of no parallel, and which we are by no means prepared to say is their real structure. " Cordaites is an important genus of extinct gymnosperms which grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites
  15. Leaf fossil ID request

    This was one of the few fossils we were able to bring home from our hunt.... Most were wood pieces of unknown variety.... really not enough detail to tell, I guess. BUT - This one stood out for me. Seems to be a large leaf! Can someone tell me what kind? I have never encountered one QUITE like this one... this large. Thank you for looking!
  16. A nice fossil hunting trip... to South Fork in Cambria County, Pennsylvania, USA! Brought a few small fossils home; there are nice fossils here - just in huge boulders! Here are a few photos! Dpaul7
  17. Artisia branch?

    Had a magnificent hunt today (photos to follow on that section). We found sigillaria in excess of 3 feet. Other nice fossils. Sadly in multi-ton rock. I did bring a few pieces back... Here are 2 pieces... Asteria? I have never found something like this around here!
  18. Probably Cordiates - stem and leaves

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Probable Cordaites Branch/Leaves Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Cordaites was probably quite a large tree of monopodial or even sympodial stature. Its trunk diameter was at a minimum 0.5 m. Branches were between 1.1 m and spaced less than 0.7 m appart. The bases of the branches usually attained about 2/3 to 1/2 of the trunk width. The abaxial cuticle has stomata arranged in multiplex stomatal rows that formed a wide stomatiferous band. A transverse crypt above the stoma is an important diagnostic feature. The cordaitalean leaves, twigs, pith casts, fertile organs and seeds found are referable to a single natural species. The associated fertile organs belong to two types: 1) male fertile organs Florinanthus volkmannii and 2) a more robust, probably female, form similar to Cordaitanthus ovatus . Cuticles from the scales and long bracts of Florinanthus volkmannii have been studied in detail. Most scale cuticles are astomatal, but stomata may occur very rarely on some parts of the abaxial cuticle. Small trichomes grew from the scale margins. The cuticle of the bract has elongate cells and stomata are arranged in single stomatal rows on the abaxial cuticle. Many bilateral monosaccate pollen grains [ Florinites ovalis , Florinites guttatus and Pseudoillinites , with a central body bipolar attachment to the equatorial saccus were separated from scale surfaces of Florinanthus volkmannii . The pith cast belong to the species Artisia approximata . The seeds are small and of the " Cardiocarpus- type". Cordaites grew in wet, peat-forming habitats and they were most likely trees of medium height. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: †Cordaites *NOTE: Photo #2 iappears to be a stem or branch - It seems to be much harder than the surrounding shale! The pictures following show structures that are probably poorly preserved leaves.
  19. Probably Cordiates - stem and leaves

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Probable Cordaites Branch/Leaves Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Cordaites was probably quite a large tree of monopodial or even sympodial stature. Its trunk diameter was at a minimum 0.5 m. Branches were between 1.1 m and spaced less than 0.7 m appart. The bases of the branches usually attained about 2/3 to 1/2 of the trunk width. The abaxial cuticle has stomata arranged in multiplex stomatal rows that formed a wide stomatiferous band. A transverse crypt above the stoma is an important diagnostic feature. The cordaitalean leaves, twigs, pith casts, fertile organs and seeds found are referable to a single natural species. The associated fertile organs belong to two types: 1) male fertile organs Florinanthus volkmannii and 2) a more robust, probably female, form similar to Cordaitanthus ovatus . Cuticles from the scales and long bracts of Florinanthus volkmannii have been studied in detail. Most scale cuticles are astomatal, but stomata may occur very rarely on some parts of the abaxial cuticle. Small trichomes grew from the scale margins. The cuticle of the bract has elongate cells and stomata are arranged in single stomatal rows on the abaxial cuticle. Many bilateral monosaccate pollen grains [ Florinites ovalis , Florinites guttatus and Pseudoillinites , with a central body bipolar attachment to the equatorial saccus were separated from scale surfaces of Florinanthus volkmannii . The pith cast belong to the species Artisia approximata . The seeds are small and of the " Cardiocarpus- type". Cordaites grew in wet, peat-forming habitats and they were most likely trees of medium height. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: †Cordaites *NOTE: Photo #2 iappears to be a stem or branch - It seems to be much harder than the surrounding shale! The pictures following show structures that are probably poorly preserved leaves.
  20. Probably Cordiates - stem and leaves

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Probable Cordaites Branch/Leaves Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Cordaites was probably quite a large tree of monopodial or even sympodial stature. Its trunk diameter was at a minimum 0.5 m. Branches were between 1.1 m and spaced less than 0.7 m appart. The bases of the branches usually attained about 2/3 to 1/2 of the trunk width. The abaxial cuticle has stomata arranged in multiplex stomatal rows that formed a wide stomatiferous band. A transverse crypt above the stoma is an important diagnostic feature. The cordaitalean leaves, twigs, pith casts, fertile organs and seeds found are referable to a single natural species. The associated fertile organs belong to two types: 1) male fertile organs Florinanthus volkmannii and 2) a more robust, probably female, form similar to Cordaitanthus ovatus . Cuticles from the scales and long bracts of Florinanthus volkmannii have been studied in detail. Most scale cuticles are astomatal, but stomata may occur very rarely on some parts of the abaxial cuticle. Small trichomes grew from the scale margins. The cuticle of the bract has elongate cells and stomata are arranged in single stomatal rows on the abaxial cuticle. Many bilateral monosaccate pollen grains [ Florinites ovalis , Florinites guttatus and Pseudoillinites , with a central body bipolar attachment to the equatorial saccus were separated from scale surfaces of Florinanthus volkmannii . The pith cast belong to the species Artisia approximata . The seeds are small and of the " Cardiocarpus- type". Cordaites grew in wet, peat-forming habitats and they were most likely trees of medium height. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: †Cordaites *NOTE: Photo #2 iappears to be a stem or branch - It seems to be much harder than the surrounding shale! The pictures following show structures that are probably poorly preserved leaves.
  21. Probably Cordiates - stem and leaves

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Probable Cordaites Branch/Leaves Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Cordaites was probably quite a large tree of monopodial or even sympodial stature. Its trunk diameter was at a minimum 0.5 m. Branches were between 1.1 m and spaced less than 0.7 m appart. The bases of the branches usually attained about 2/3 to 1/2 of the trunk width. The abaxial cuticle has stomata arranged in multiplex stomatal rows that formed a wide stomatiferous band. A transverse crypt above the stoma is an important diagnostic feature. The cordaitalean leaves, twigs, pith casts, fertile organs and seeds found are referable to a single natural species. The associated fertile organs belong to two types: 1) male fertile organs Florinanthus volkmannii and 2) a more robust, probably female, form similar to Cordaitanthus ovatus . Cuticles from the scales and long bracts of Florinanthus volkmannii have been studied in detail. Most scale cuticles are astomatal, but stomata may occur very rarely on some parts of the abaxial cuticle. Small trichomes grew from the scale margins. The cuticle of the bract has elongate cells and stomata are arranged in single stomatal rows on the abaxial cuticle. Many bilateral monosaccate pollen grains [ Florinites ovalis , Florinites guttatus and Pseudoillinites , with a central body bipolar attachment to the equatorial saccus were separated from scale surfaces of Florinanthus volkmannii . The pith cast belong to the species Artisia approximata . The seeds are small and of the " Cardiocarpus- type". Cordaites grew in wet, peat-forming habitats and they were most likely trees of medium height. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: †Cordaites *NOTE: Photo #2 iappears to be a stem or branch - It seems to be much harder than the surrounding shale! The pictures following show structures that are probably poorly preserved leaves.
  22. Probably Cordiates - stem and leaves

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Probable Cordaites Branch/Leaves Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Cordaites was probably quite a large tree of monopodial or even sympodial stature. Its trunk diameter was at a minimum 0.5 m. Branches were between 1.1 m and spaced less than 0.7 m appart. The bases of the branches usually attained about 2/3 to 1/2 of the trunk width. The abaxial cuticle has stomata arranged in multiplex stomatal rows that formed a wide stomatiferous band. A transverse crypt above the stoma is an important diagnostic feature. The cordaitalean leaves, twigs, pith casts, fertile organs and seeds found are referable to a single natural species. The associated fertile organs belong to two types: 1) male fertile organs Florinanthus volkmannii and 2) a more robust, probably female, form similar to Cordaitanthus ovatus . Cuticles from the scales and long bracts of Florinanthus volkmannii have been studied in detail. Most scale cuticles are astomatal, but stomata may occur very rarely on some parts of the abaxial cuticle. Small trichomes grew from the scale margins. The cuticle of the bract has elongate cells and stomata are arranged in single stomatal rows on the abaxial cuticle. Many bilateral monosaccate pollen grains [ Florinites ovalis , Florinites guttatus and Pseudoillinites , with a central body bipolar attachment to the equatorial saccus were separated from scale surfaces of Florinanthus volkmannii . The pith cast belong to the species Artisia approximata . The seeds are small and of the " Cardiocarpus- type". Cordaites grew in wet, peat-forming habitats and they were most likely trees of medium height. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: †Cordaites *NOTE: Photo #2 iappears to be a stem or branch - It seems to be much harder than the surrounding shale! The pictures following show structures that are probably poorly preserved leaves.
  23. Eusphenopteris neuropteroides 2.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eusphenopteris neuropteroides Fern Eastern Kentucky Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Pteridosperms or seed ferns are a group of extinct plants with mostly fern-like foliage but having real seeds. They were mostly small trees but other forms that exhibited climbing growth have been found. Some forms, notably those called the Medullosales as seen here had large fronds which could be up several meters long. Several groups can be distinguished within the Pteridosperms. The Pteridosperms evolved in the latest Devonian, and became common in the Carboniferous. The Medullosales took over the leading role during the Westphalian and persisted into the Permian. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Cycadophyta Class: Cycadopsida Order: †Medullosales Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Eusphenopteris Species: †neuropteroides
  24. Eusphenopteris neuropteroides

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eusphenopteris neuropteroides Fern Eastern Kentucky Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Pteridosperms or seed ferns are a group of extinct plants with mostly fern-like foliage but having real seeds. They were mostly small trees but other forms that exhibited climbing growth have been found. Some forms, notably those called the Medullosales as seen here had large fronds which could be up several meters long. Several groups can be distinguished within the Pteridosperms. The Pteridosperms evolved in the latest Devonian, and became common in the Carboniferous. The Medullosales took over the leading role during the Westphalian and persisted into the Permian. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Cycadophyta Class: Cycadopsida Order: †Medullosales Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Eusphenopteris Species: †neuropteroides
  25. Mariopteris ferns?

    Hello! I received these two pieces as a nice gift! I WANT to say Mariopteris - I think definitely in photo #1 - but photo #2, while I WANT to say Mariopteris, I am leaning a bit toward Eusphenopteris!
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