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Found 432 results

  1. Squashed Mazon Creek Crustacean?

    This is another piece from the Mazon Creek Chowder Flats site, it was shattered into quite a few pieces, but I was able to reassemble it. However, I can't tell what it is. I am certain it is some kind of crustacean, based on the texture and color of the shell and the presence of a long segmented antenna. But it seems to be rather flattened, and I can't make out many other details. There does appear to a segmented piece extending from the top edge of the blob to the edge of the nodule, but I can't make out any clear segments or limbs. The shape is reminiscent of Mamayocaris, perhaps just a poorly preserved one? The only other Essex Fauna crustacean that seems to roughly match the squat shape is the rare Dithyrocaris.
  2. sponge reference

    Does anyone have access to this reference to help me ID Arizona Pennsylvanian sponges. Please PM me. Wewokella and other sponges from the Pennsylvanian Minturn Formation of north-central Colorado JK Rigby, SB Church Journal of Paleontology 67 (6), 909-916 Thanks, John
  3. Over the winter I was freezing and thawing nodules found in reclaimed coal mine spoils from the Pennsylvanian Shelburn Formation, Busseron Sandstone from Vigo County Indiana. These contain flora and rare fauna similar to the Braidwood Biota from Mazon Creek. This nodule split off a tiny bit on one end and I set aside for further investigation after a quick glance revealed an interesting pattern. Then I forgot about until I was recently unpacking from a move, and re-examined it under magnification. Unfortunately, the piece that split off the end was lost, so I only have the one side, but it shows a small rectangular patch of texture, about 10 mm wide. The piece preserved shows folds and wrinkles, as well as what looks like a tear in the center, and looking under magnification reveals the entire piece is covered with tiny pebbly bumps. My first assumption would be plant material, but it doesn't match the texture of any of the other plants I have found at this site. A much less likely option would be a patch of skin from some sort of animal or egg casing. I would like to get it under greater magnification and will try to find an expert to look at it, but I wanted to put the best pictures I was able to take here for y'all's thoughts. Thanks!
  4. A Strange Rhode Island Fern

    I was going through some material from Cory’s Lane, a Carboniferous fossil site in Rhode Island, when I noticed this fern. It didn’t really look like anything else I had and so I came here for some help. I’m very new to identifying fern fossils, so any help is greatly appreciated.
  5. Sponge or concretion?

    I assumed this item was a concretion. I regularly find fist-sized concretions in the Argentine member of the Kansas City group (Pennsylvanian subsystem). But looking this morning at a comment by @WhodamanHD here I wondered whether what I have is a sponge. The specimen is about 6 inches across and 4.5 inches from top to bottom. What do you think?
  6. Large Crinoid

    I was out fossil hunting and was seeing some small shells and pieces of small crinoid. Then I came across this giant. It is 2 pieces of crinoid stuck together in matrix. I am used to Cretaceous fossils not Pennsylvanian. Does anyone know if this is large for a crinoid? It is the largest one I have seen but I have only looked for crinoids 3 or 4 times before. Size: Longer one is 16mm in diameter. Smaller one is 14mm in diameter.
  7. Pennsylvanian Shell

    Found in creek. Liberty, MO. Shell Of some sort. Pennsylvanian.
  8. Carbon Film Plant/Arthopod?

    Does anyone know what this fossil is? It might be a pseudo fossil. It was found in Liberty, MO, USA. Pennsylvanian. Fossils found near it include crinoids, shells, and other marine life.
  9. The town of Morris, Illinois was once home to a number of rich sites for Mazon Creek fossil collecting, remnants of early 20th century strip and pit mining of the Colchester Coal. As the town grew, these localities were reclaimed, turned into subdivisions and commercial developments. One of the most well-known sites was called Chowder Flats, named after the high proportion of clams found there. In the late 1980s the spoils were plowed under and development began at that spot, but it was not built up all at once. New houses have continued to be put up on empty lots right up to the present- in fact, construction has recently started on two of the last three remaining lots. I was lucky enough to be checking out the site this last week on a day off work and found that they had dug up those two lots to lay the foundations, leaving piles of fill surrounding the building sites- and I was hoping in that fill I would find some of the famous Mazon Creek nodules. I parked on the street nearby and approached one of builders to ask if he minded me searching the piles. He said it wouldn't be a problem and asked if I was searching for fossils, so I told him I was indeed. He had actually been involved in construction at the site for years, and told me how years back the building sites there used to be crawling with fossil collectors, but I was the first person he had seen collecting in a long while. I thanked him and started searching, and throughout the day he would also toss me nodules he came across! It didn't take long to find my first nodule, and I was able to turn up many more over the next few hours- by the time I had to leave, I had collected about 1-2 gallons worth weathering out of the dirt piles. Great results for not a lot of effort, especially in comparison to the work needed to find things at Mazonia-Braidwood/Pit 11 these days! But that wasn't what made the day truly unforgettable... I will continue with that in the next post!
  10. Arizona Sponge

    I found a sponge in the Pennsylvanian Naco Formation north of Payson, Arizona. It may be the same species as an earlier find although instead of pancake form it is a conical form: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/82186-knocking-about-the-naco-pennsylvanian-sponges-and-corals/&tab=comments#comment-871386 The first photo is of the convex outer surface. Part of top is broken off. Longest length of the sponge is 8cm. Any ideas as to identity? @Arizona Chris See photos in additional posts since I am doing this on a phone and cannot reduce file size.
  11. I am preparing a plate from the Upper Pennsylvanian Naco Formation, in Southern Arizona. I think I may have found part of a trilobite, among all the brachiopods. Does anyone have a clue as to the species? I really can't find any info on trilobites in this formation. The locality is definitely not known as a trilobite-collecting one.
  12. I have had these in my collection and just looking for a confirmation that they are the Pennsylvanian sponge Regispongia contorta from Palo Pinto limestone of Cisco, Texas.
  13. Brachiopod help

    Can anyone help ID this shell? It's from the Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation near Cordova, Alabama. Size is about 3/4 to 1 inch across. Found in a layer of shale with lots of plant fossils.
  14. Cepholopod? Fossil ID

    I traveled up to OK to do some hunting last week. I stopped near a town called Gene Autry, OK near the Washita River. I found this at the site I was hunting. Sorry the top isn’t in focus. I was trying to get the shape of the sections on it. It looks like a cross between an orthoceras and a baculite, but I am pretty sure the site was Pennsylvanian despite the geological map saying it is Holocene. I also found what I believe was part of a crinoid stem, which turned to dust when I tried to pick it up. I got a pic first though. I’m learning my lesson. I cant see any septa on this, so I do t know what it is. I’m sure this is an easy one, I’ve just never seen one. Any Help would be appreciated.
  15. Eusphenopteris?

    I was hiking in Berkeley county WV and last week and came across this fern fossil? I'm a neophyte when it comes to fossil ID but wanted to know if anyone could give me some idea of what I found? Thanks, Matt Orsie - Hedgesville, WV
  16. Ammonite tease

    I was up in Cloudcroft on an errand and thought I might as well drive a few miles along Forest Service Road 5661, just south of the town. Here, Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks are exposed along the cuts of the gravel road. You see a lot of pieces of fossils, but so far, anything remotely approaching whole has escaped me. Also, the rock does not seem to fracture in any kind of systematic plane, but rather at random and often right through the center of a fossil, leaving a thin section exposed and not a "half." But the stuff is there. It is frustrating. And then this thing ...
  17. carboniferous Midcontinent

    Concise & clear.What more do you want? algeidcontin143.pdf About 1,5 Mb
  18. I had forgotten I had found Worthenia fossils of this size at the Jacksboro Pennsylvanian period Finis Shale site. Found these probably on my first or second collecting trip to that site 5 or 6 years ago. I have boxes of stuff I haven't looked in for years. Finding stuff that's surprising me.
  19. Another grouping of fossils from the Pennsylvanian Finis Shale Site near Jacksboro, Texas. Always something to find there.
  20. Found this somewhat flattened Brach (Derbyia crassa) in the Pennsylvanian age Finis Shale formation at the Lost Creek Reservoir borrow pit near Jacksboro, in Jack County, Texas a couple of weeks ago. It's not perfect but I love fossils that are still in the matrix and that aren't pristine and show signs of predation and deformation from the weight of the overlying matrix.
  21. I'll be in north central Texas all next week and I was hoping someone could help with some accessible spots for the Bridgeport Shale. Any other recommendations are also welcome. My e-mail is tngray@nautiloid.net
  22. Cordaites w/ Artisia

    From the album icycatelf's Backyard Fossils

    Cordaites with Artisia Hyden Formation Middle Pennsylvanian Eastern Kentucky 5.6cm (length) Fossil from a Cordaites tree with pith (Artisia) exposed
  23. Zig-zag impression

    couldn't get a good pic because of shadows...went back and shoved some clay into it. What is it? Thank you.
  24. Cordaites borassifolius.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cordaites borassifolius plant Poland, Upper Silesia Carboniferous, Westphalian "C", Middle Pennsylvanian, Moscovian, (309.0 -305.9 million years ago) Dimension: matrix 65x65mm. Cordaites borassifolius was probably quite a large tree of monopodial or even sympodial stature. Its trunk diameter was at a minimum 0.5 m. Branches were between 1.1 m and spaced less than 0.7 m appart. The bases of the branches usually attained about 2/3 to 1/2 of the trunk width. The abaxial cuticle has stomata arranged in multiplex stomatal rows that formed a wide stomatiferous band. A transverse crypt above the stoma is an important diagnostic feature. The cordaitalean leaves, twigs, pith casts, fertile organs and seeds found are referable to a single natural species. The associated fertile organs belong to two types: 1) male fertile organs Florinanthus volkmannii and 2) a more robust, probably female, form similar to Cordaitanthus ovatus . Cuticles from the scales and long bracts of Florinanthus volkmannii have been studied in detail. Most scale cuticles are astomatal, but stomata may occur very rarely on some parts of the abaxial cuticle. Small trichomes grew from the scale margins. The cuticle of the bract has elongate cells and stomata are arranged in single stomatal rows on the abaxial cuticle. Many bilateral monosaccate pollen grains [ Florinites ovalis , Florinites guttatus and Pseudoillinites , with a central body bipolar attachment to the equatorial saccus were separated from scale surfaces of Florinanthus volkmannii . The pith cast belong to the species Artisia approximata . The seeds are small and of the " Cardiocarpus- type". Cordaites borassifolius grew in wet, peat-forming habitats and they were most likely trees of medium height. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites Species: borassifolius
  25. This is a drawing I made a couple weeks ago. It is Euproops danae, a Pennsylvanian Horseshoe crab from the Mazon Creek (proper). My nodule is 100% complete with no restorations. Being a Mazon specimen, it comes from the Francis Energy Shale and is about 300 million years old. This drawing was done on textured paper with 2B and 4B pencils.
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