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Found 735 results

  1. I'm going to be taking a drive this year from Pittsburgh to Charlottesville to SE Kentucky, to Knoxville, TN to catch some of the autumn foliage, and was wondering if anyone had any suggestion on fossilized foliage outcrops or spoils piles. I'm trying to focus on ferns and other plants, as I've collected a lot of marine fossils previously and want to get some new types of specimens. I've seen some stuff online about Ambridge, PA and Big Hill in KY, but haven't been able to find too many other public spots besides that. Just wondering if anyone had any suggestions or recommendations. Thanks.
  2. Pennsylvanian trilobite ID

    I was going through my trilobite pygidiums and cephalons from the Winterset of the Pennsylvanian Kansas City group and I found this cephalon that seems different from the others I have. In particular, the genal spine seems curved. In the photos you can see both the internal mold and, in the other half of the split, the inside of the shell. I assume the pygidium beside it is belongs to the same creature, but I could be wrong. Any help with the ID will be appreciated. Russ
  3. While I have been out fossil hunting a bit in the Texas Summertime heat I am still having great fun with the Micro Matrix- it sure is pleasant to sit in the AC and poke about for fossils! I had some great little finds in the Mineral Wells matrix, but i am just amazed by the Bridgeport matrix. Even though it's still Pennsylvanian, it's very different from the MIneral Wells stuff! Different formations and all..... What's really neat about the Bridgeport matrix is firstly - it's bigger, typically. and secondly...it's COLORFUL! Reds and golds and purply browns and oranges. It's really lovely stuff!! Here are some of my favorites from the Jasper Creek formation. : First the Echinoid bits - I love these little "cat ghost" plates. 2 mm Most of the spines were incomplete, but I found a nice base and a nice spine, just not all one piece 7mm base and 1 cm spine A funky Echinoid plate 7 mm So many neat Crinoid fragements - arms, cup fragements, columnals, etc! All of these are aprox 5-8 mm except the first one which is a honking 1.5 cm. ) And this crazy crinoid spine that was broken and was regenerating before it died...hence the "dimple" on the end. Thanks fellow Forum Members for helping with that ID! 1 cm Love this crinoid column...I think it's my favorite. It's so Art Deco.....about 3 million years early. 1 cm Some other nice/ interesting finds Neospirifer Brachiopod 5 mm Not sure what this is...I assume a brachiopod. 5 mm Colorful Bryzoans 4 mm Bryzoan on a Crinoid 8 mm Girtycoelia sponges Each are aprox 5-8 mm Gastropods: Pseudozygopleura 4mm Possilbly a Phymataopleura? Not sure of ID 5 mm Possibly Goniasma? 5mm And then there's this thing......a bryzoan encrusting a sponge! 1 cm
  4. Need help with ID

    I’ve just recently found this fossil in the North Attleboro fossil locality and need help identifying, it is a little bit longer than a half inch
  5. Any ideas as to what this is?

    I’m not sure what this is, if anything it’s about 7/8 of an inch long. I’m not even sure if it is a fossil, or just maybe a torn leaf.
  6. Pennsylvanian Naco Fm. “Wood”

    I have found some Pennsylvanian silicified “wood” from the lower part of the (~207 mya) Naco Formation in Arizona. This is the first recorded instance of likely plant material from the Naco. The formation is all marine in the section that I found it in and has lots of crinoids and brachiopods. One piece has some slight plant like internal texture with isolated circles and curved hash. Photo of side view of 90 mm wide piece with calcite rhomb molds. Most of the wood from that time had distinctive exteriors such as Calamities, Lepidodendron and Sigillaria. Any idea of what my pieces of wood might be? Could they be internal pieces of above mentioned varieties without the distinctive texture? Could it be a tree fern such as Psaronius? @paleoflor Attached picture of single piece on a blue zippered notebook is about 185 mm long.
  7. Trigonocarpus?

    I recently collected this plate out of a block of shale full of Alethopteris fronds from the spoils of a coal mine in Pennsylvania. You can see some of the Alethopteris on this piece. My initial impression is that these are seeds, with Trigonocarpus serving as the kinda catch-all for Pennsylvanian fern seeds. However, I have never seen an example of Trigonocarpus that has these markings. Both of these fossils have little, golf ball-like dents on them. The fossils measure 4cm and 2.5cm respectively. Has anyone seen something like this before? Do these markings mean that these are something different than Trigonocarpus? Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  8. Hi all, Recently I was collecting at a locality that exposes the Duquesne Limestone and shale, which if you’ve seen any of my previous posts you’ll know that I’ve collected extensively. But for those of you that have not, the Duquesne shale is a layer of black, carbonaceous shale found in areas where the Conemaugh group is exposed. This layer is chalk full of disarticulated vertebrate remains, but some of the most recognizable are the teeth of Orthacanthus and Xenacanthus. These were eel-like sharks that existed from the Devonian-Triassic and had bicuspid or tricuspid teeth. They grew to be about 10-12 feet at the largest and thrived in the swampy lakes of the late Pennsylvanian. It’s somewhat uncommon for me to find a large Orthacanthus tooth (which are tiny compared to Otodus sp. )and it is even rarer for me to find a tooth with feeding damage. It seems to me that, understandably, many collectors of Cenozoic shark teeth are disappointed when they find shark teeth with feeding damage, but for me at least when I find Paleozoic shark teeth with feeding damage it makes it even more special. Last time I was collecting I did just that. Interestingly enough this Orthacanthus compressus tooth is my largest yet and has a very unusual break. The cusp that is missing is not broken cleanly at the enamel, rather, when it broke off it took a good chunk of the rooth with it. To me at least this would indicate that the shark was using quite a bit of force when it bit down, and whatever it bit in to must have been very hard and made for a painful meal for the shark. It’s important to note that the other cusp was damaged recently and isn’t feeding damage. I’m not one to heavily speculate but I’d imagine that it had to have bit in to one of the heavily armored Paleoniscoids for damage of this nature to take place. Or, who knows, the tooth might have just been old. Whatever happened to break the cusp is lost to time, I guess. Regardless, I think it’s a wonderful find and reminds me that these animals were truly alive and had imperfections. Hopefully you all find this as interesting as I do .
  9. Hello! I have been cracking open a few more concretions from Muncie Creek and I cracked open this bizarre fossil! I know braincases have been found in these nodules since I have found a braincase of Lawrenciella, and donated a braincase that was found to have parts of the upper jaw! My main reasoning for asking if this is a braincase is that it has a few bizarre structures I have not seen in other concretion fossils. The chance that it is an ordinary bone is very much a possibility. on the left you can see that there are these repeating structures Here is a more zoomed in image. Here is the image zoomed out for refrence. Below are images of the bizarre round patterns that are visible on the fossil Some general info on the area: Location: Missouri Timer period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Muncie Creek Shale member Size refrence:
  10. Hello! I was cracking open some more phosphate nodules from the Muncie creek shale formation and had these stored in my room for a while! I was wondering if anyone could identify these very hard to determine fossils as I cannot tell if they contain bone fragments or if the fossils are from a coprolite! I think the one on the bottom right could be a either bone or coprolitic material More images of the specimen on the left which I believe is either fish excitement or fish vomit, I am unsure as I have found similar fossils to this inside some other nodules. Unsure what this one is as well! Any guess is welcomed! Location is in Missouri The area is dated to the Pennsylvanian Formation is the Muncie Creek Shale member
  11. Discovered fossil tracks determined to be oldest known in Grand Canyon National Park ABC, Channel 15 News, Arizona The open access paper is: Rowland, S.M., Caputo, M.V., and Jensen, Z.A., 2020. Early adaptation to eolian sand dunes by basal amniotes is documented in two Pennsylvanian Grand Canyon trackways. PLoS ONE 15(8): e0237636. A related paper is: Francischini, H., Lucas, S.G., Voigt, S., Marchetti, L., Santucci, V.L., Knight, C.L., Wood, J.R., Dentzien-Dias, P. and Schultz, C.L., 2020. On the ;presence of Ichniotherium in the Coconino Sandstone (Cisuralian) of the Grand Canyon and remarks on the occupation of deserts by non-amniote tetrapods. PalZ, 94(1), pp.207-225. Yours, Paul H.
  12. Pennsylvanian Lepidodendron Mystery

    I recently collected this piece with these two articulated fossils at an exposure of the Llewellyn Formation in Pennsylvania. They are respectively 14cm and 16cm in length. Based on an image in a book I initially thought they were Lepidostrobus (the cone of Lepidodendron) but now I am having my doubts. Examples of Lepidostrobus that I have seen on the Internet include the scales that come off the cone and these fossils clearly do not have these scales. On the other hand, these fossils have the typical diamond pattern that is characteristic of the bark of Lepidodendron, leading me to believe that these are examples of its branches. Yet they don't really look very branch-like with how thin they are and how much they bend. Does anyone know what these could be? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  13. Hello! and I hope you are having a wonderful afternoon! I found these two plant fossils and was unsure to what they might actually be. They look a lot like modern seeds but I know I am not always informed and I keep having a slight suspicion they could be apart of some other plant material! If anyone could help identify and confirm these plant fossils I would be very grateful! I have found leaves from Neuropteris sp , Cyclopteris sp, and a few other plant species in these types of limestone! Info that I could gather: Location: Missouri Time period: Pennsylvanian Formation: Possibly Upper Winterset Limestone Specimen #1: Two halves of one seed? (roughly 9mm) Other half: Specimen #2: Larger and wider seed? (roughly 3mm) I unfortunately do not have the other half to this one!
  14. Cyclopteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    The leaf section of the specimen is 3.6cm wide and length is 3.3cm long!
  15. Hello! I have found a few ferns at a road-cut and was wondering if anyone could identify these ferns below! I have found trilobites (small), Neuropteris fern leaves, many Calamites, and ocean invertebrates in the area. I was very lucky to find these plant fossils as they appear to be relatively uncommon in the road cut area! Specimen #1: I found this lovely leaf with a few imprints of fern fossil right next to it! (3.5cm) Specimen #2: A lovely... Ginkgo? I had posted this previously on a different website and noted it looked like a Gingko. I was not sure as the leaf has a more rounded edge and not a split edge like the Ginkgo I saw online Nevertheless it could be a squished Ginkgo or a related species! Specimen #3: A lovely leaf and one of my largest that I was able to find (5.3cm) Specimen #4: A beautiful fern fossil leaf (3.4cm) Some general information I was able to gather from the area! Time period: Pennsylvanian Location: Missouri Formation: Upper Winterset Limestone Thanks to Missourian For the possible Formation ID
  16. Calamite #2

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    One of my favorite Calamites due to how well preserved its internal anatomy is! I gave this to a friend's little brother who loves fossils.
  17. Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    Large Leaf with a few smaller leaf imprints from Alethopteris, sp
  18. Cyclopteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

  19. Possibly Cyclopteris, Or Neuropteris Sp.

    From the album Missouri Plant Fossils

    This specimen is roughly 5.3Cm!
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