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Found 396 results

  1. Here are a couple of "old" pieces from St. Clair that I found. The first one is a faint trace that I think is Pectopteris but I find it so rarely at St. Clair I can't tell for sure. What is throwing me off is that the leaflets are getting longer as they progress along the rachis whereas I have always thought that Pectopteris had a consistent leaflet length along the whole leaf. Then the second piece is a cluster of leaves/leaflets that don't match anything I've seen before. The tips of the leaves are not pointed enough for Alethopteris and not wide enough for Neuropteris. Any suggestions are appreciated.
  2. Backyard Trip

    My folks have a nice lake behind their house. It is relaxing to spend a warm evening watching a heron spear fish or geese fight each other. Or watch silt slowly fill the lake bed. Across the street, a housing developer stripped off a bunch of soil down to the bedrock, but ran out of money before building on the land. This has resulted in some significant erosion and sedimentation in the lake, but this cloud does have a silver lining. I soon noticed a thick bed of shale exposed on the hill. So it was only a matter of time until I make the short trip to the top. The hill, with exposed shale, can be seen on the right. No, I did not hunt that day. A few weeks ago, I drove up there and poked around the Pennsylvanian strata. The Island Creek Shale is the first bed encountered: There are thin beds of calcareous sandstone within. Oh look, ripple marks: And trace fossils: I've found fusulinids and brachiopods where the shale thins several miles to the south.
  3. Sponge ID

    What type is this sponge from the Pennsylvanian Naco Fm. from near Payson, Arizona? The silicified sponge is about 1.5 to 2 inches across. Was it originally a silicious or calcareous sponge? Does anyone know of an expert who is interested in undescribed sponges from Arizona/USA? I know of at least 3 other undescribed Arizona sponges. Thanks, John
  4. Hi, I am not a fossil hunter but accidentally discovered the ability to find 300,000,000 yr old fossils in Mazon Creek on a TV show. Wow!!! I've been researching all day and now want to take my family there for spring break in March! Our story (short) & my questions: My daughter is very interested in science and nature and critters. She spends hours outside digging contently for rocks, loves bugs, has rock collections, books on rocks & minerals, etc. She struggles in the classroom (3rd grade) and learns best by hands on experience. She would absolutely be in heaven here- our whole family would! I love to help my daughter experience her interests through our adventures. What advice could you give a family of 3 who has never hunted fossils? We are in Missouri so interested in camping close by- does anyone know of any good evening Camping places? Do we need to register with the state park and get daily admission? Should we go where most tourists go or off the beaten path? Is it possible for newbies to find a few fossils? Even if we found the most common we'd be so excited! We love exploring and take small hikes as a family. Are there spots within a couple miles of the "road" or parking? I truly appreciate any help! I will keep researching as well. I hope we can go and see this unbelievable history!!
  5. Mariopteris Fern Fossil 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mariopteris Fern Fossil Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~330 Million Years Ago) The Medullosales is an order of pteridospermous seed plants characterised by large ovules with circular cross-section, with a vascularised nucellus, complex pollen-organs, stems and rachides with a dissected stele, and frond-like leaves. Their nearest still-living relatives are the cycads. Most medullosaleans were small to medium-sized trees. The largest were probably the trees with Alethopteris fronds - these fronds could be at least 7 metres long and the trees were perhaps up to 10 metres tall. Especially in Moscovian times, many medullosaleans were rather smaller trees with fronds only about 2 metres long, and apparently growing in dense, mutually supporting stands. During Kasimovian and Gzhelian times there were also non-arboreal forms with smaller fronds (e.g. Odontopteris) that were probably scrambling or possibly climbing plants. Kingdom: Plantae superphylum: †Tracheophyta subphylum: †Euphyllophytina unranked clade: †Radiatopses Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Mariopteris
  6. Mariopteris Fern Fossil 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mariopteris Fern Fossil Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~330 Million Years Ago) The Medullosales is an order of pteridospermous seed plants characterised by large ovules with circular cross-section, with a vascularised nucellus, complex pollen-organs, stems and rachides with a dissected stele, and frond-like leaves. Their nearest still-living relatives are the cycads. Most medullosaleans were small to medium-sized trees. The largest were probably the trees with Alethopteris fronds - these fronds could be at least 7 metres long and the trees were perhaps up to 10 metres tall. Especially in Moscovian times, many medullosaleans were rather smaller trees with fronds only about 2 metres long, and apparently growing in dense, mutually supporting stands. During Kasimovian and Gzhelian times there were also non-arboreal forms with smaller fronds (e.g. Odontopteris) that were probably scrambling or possibly climbing plants. Kingdom: Plantae superphylum: †Tracheophyta subphylum: †Euphyllophytina unranked clade: †Radiatopses Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Mariopteris
  7. Mariopteris Fern Fossil 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mariopteris Fern Fossil Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~330 Million Years Ago) The Medullosales is an order of pteridospermous seed plants characterised by large ovules with circular cross-section, with a vascularised nucellus, complex pollen-organs, stems and rachides with a dissected stele, and frond-like leaves. Their nearest still-living relatives are the cycads. Most medullosaleans were small to medium-sized trees. The largest were probably the trees with Alethopteris fronds - these fronds could be at least 7 metres long and the trees were perhaps up to 10 metres tall. Especially in Moscovian times, many medullosaleans were rather smaller trees with fronds only about 2 metres long, and apparently growing in dense, mutually supporting stands. During Kasimovian and Gzhelian times there were also non-arboreal forms with smaller fronds (e.g. Odontopteris) that were probably scrambling or possibly climbing plants. Kingdom: Plantae superphylum: †Tracheophyta subphylum: †Euphyllophytina unranked clade: †Radiatopses Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Mariopteris
  8. Mariopteris Fern Fossil 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Mariopteris Fern Fossil Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~330 Million Years Ago) The Medullosales is an order of pteridospermous seed plants characterised by large ovules with circular cross-section, with a vascularised nucellus, complex pollen-organs, stems and rachides with a dissected stele, and frond-like leaves. Their nearest still-living relatives are the cycads. Most medullosaleans were small to medium-sized trees. The largest were probably the trees with Alethopteris fronds - these fronds could be at least 7 metres long and the trees were perhaps up to 10 metres tall. Especially in Moscovian times, many medullosaleans were rather smaller trees with fronds only about 2 metres long, and apparently growing in dense, mutually supporting stands. During Kasimovian and Gzhelian times there were also non-arboreal forms with smaller fronds (e.g. Odontopteris) that were probably scrambling or possibly climbing plants. Kingdom: Plantae superphylum: †Tracheophyta subphylum: †Euphyllophytina unranked clade: †Radiatopses Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Mariopteris
  9. More Pennsylvanian conodonts

    Here are a few more conodonts I found today. I had no luck in getting any out of the matrix, so I took some in situ pictures. Like the one I posted yesterday, these are all from the Stark Shale Member, Kansas City Group, Pennsylvanian Subsystem. They range in size from 1-2 mm or so. Russ Below is a closeup of the specimen above.
  10. Last weekend, since the weather was supposed to be nice and my wife was out of town, I decided to get out and collect from three Pennsylvanian sites in Illinois and Indiana. On Friday, I took the day off work and headed down to the former Chieftain no.20 mine site south of Terre Haute, in what is now the Griffin Bike Park. It was an overcast day with a slight drizzle and I had the park all to myself. I found a nice assortment of nodules, including a few split ones with ferns- the one on the left, although preserved in three pieces, is my biggest one yet from this site. The best find didn't come until I cleaned them after I got home, though. What I thought was a slim fern pinnule turned out to be a millipede, my first! No Myriapoda have been reported from this site, and the preservation is not perfect, so I am not sure what the ID would be for this one. The next day I met up with my dad and enjoyed an outrageously beautiful day at Mazonia-Braidwood in northern Illinois collecting Mazon Creek nodules. I was glad I brought sunscreen! None of the split nodules I found had anything spectacular, just a few nice Essexella, but we found a good assortment of concretions and got to explore a portion of the park I had not been to before. I was also able to educate some folks we met in the parking lot who were visiting from Missouri about what to look for when collecting fossils in the park and shared some of my extra split nodules to make sure they didn't go home empty-handed. It's always a pleasure seeing other fossil collectors in the park.
  11. Horn Coral with?

    What is the net like pattern that sticks-out on the inside and outside of a silicified Pennsylvanian horn coral from NW of Payson, Arizona? Could it be an epibont-sponge? Could it be silica that filled cracks in part of the coral that was not silicified and eroded away? The coral opening is about 2.5 inches across.
  12. Naco Fm. fossil

    I found this "spiky head" chert fossil in Pennsylvanian Naco Formation Limestone NW of Payson, Arizona near Pine. The "head" is about 1/3 inch across. Is it a crinoid head without arms, what kind? Thanks, John
  13. Clams in coal shale ?

    Found on a coal shale dump near Jolliette, PA. Fresh water bivalves ? Marine bivalves washed in during a transgression ? Or could they be Branchiopods ? Other ?
  14. Unknown item from Pennsylvanian shale

    I found this item in shale from the Stark Shale Member, Kansas City Group of the Pennsylvanian. Photos are of either of the halves of the specimen. The specimen is about 2 cm long. I would appreciate ID help. The only thought I had was that it seems to be flora and that the "stem" looks similar in appearance to Cordaites. Thanks, Russ
  15. Group of conodont fragments?

    As I have continued to examine the conodonts I'm finding in Stark Shale Member material (Kansas City Group, Pennsylvanian), I've found what appears to be a group of conodont fragments. What does this look like to you all? Russ
  16. Horn Coral Polished Slice 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Horn Coral Polished Slice SITE LOCATION: Ryley Canyon, Utah TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian age (~300 million year old) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  17. Horn Coral Polished Slice 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Horn Coral Polished Slice SITE LOCATION: Ryley Canyon, Utah TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian age (~300 million year old) Data: Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more material to the cone. Each layer was a little bigger than the previous one. All corals belong to the phylum of animals called cnidaria. They are related to jellyfish which are also cnidaria. While modern corals are colonial the now extinct horn corals could be colonial or solitary animals. They had many tentacles sticking out to gather food. The tentacles gave them a flower like appearance. The oldest of the Rugosa corals are found in rocks from the Ordovician Period. Many species evolved during the Paleozoic Era. As a group they flourished until the Permian Period when they became extinct along with most living things during the Great Permian Extinction. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Rugosa
  18. Pennsylvanian conodont

    A couple of months ago I collected a small bucket of shale from the Stark Shale Member in the Dennis Formation of the Kansas City Group. My purpose was to find conodonts. Today, I had a chance to look at the shale and I found a conodont this afternoon--the first one I've ever found . I was able to extract this with a small needle in a pen vise. I took the pictures with a Celestron MicroCapture Pro. For any locals that are interested, this came from the Firemen's Memorial. Russ
  19. Well I am shipping my most recent shark cartilage to the "American Museum of Natural History" today. They said it is most likely another partial skull and since this stuff is pretty rare they would like to have in their collection. Maybe this partial can be used with other material for a study for someone.
  20. fossil mud cracks?

    I found this on a gravel bar in se Kansas the surface rocks are Pennsylvanian age. it looks to me like fossilized mud cracks, first I would like to know if you guys agree. second I'm trying to figure out how this was formed, the cracks curve around the edge of the rock and show up on the bottom edge. my guess is that it was pressed up on the one side exposing it to the air, maybe from something stepping in the mud? anybody have a better explanation?
  21. Today I decided to drive about 150 miles round trip to go to an auction that sometimes has fossils. This time there was only a Riker mount of composite Spinosaurus teeth and a huge ammonite that hardly fit into a banana box. I believe that the ammonite might have come from Texas and it looked like it weighed +120 lbs. Neither of these items sparked my interest, and since it was a sunny, 55 degree day, I decided to stop at a couple road cuts that I had visited earlier in the year. The first road cut (Site 1) is near Oglesby, Illinois and is located right next to the former Lonestar Quarry, that contains limestone from the Pennsylvanian Bond and Mattoon formations. The second (site 2) is about 5 minutes away and appears to contain the same type of fossils, just in better shape, since I have yet to find any loose fossils here. On my way back home I drove by Site 1 again and met Fossil Forum member @Siwash and his family collecting. Composita argentia Brachiopod Juresania nebrascensis Brachiopod Punctospirifer kentuckyensis Brachiopod (?)
  22. Mariopteris vs Sphenopteris

    As I am going through my boxes of findings from the Llewellyn formation at St. Clair, PA, I came across some more interesting plates. Normally I would call this short, rounded foliage "Sphenopteris" but some research with the PA Geological Survey's book "Fossil Plants from the Anthracite Coal Fields of Eastern Pennsylvania", General Geology Report 72, 1982, John Oleksyshyn, I'm thinking these might be more accurately called Mariopteris cf. lobata. Here is Figure 14 from the book that illustrates (plates A,B) what I think is a close match to what I have. The book also states that the specimens that are used for the plates come from St. Clair so it is known to occur there. Thoughts?
  23. I was bored this morning so I decided to take a quick 70 mile drive to an area close to the Illinois State Park- Starved Rock. The road cuts are not to far from the former Lonestar Quarry in Oglesby that contains limestone from the Pennsylvanian Bond and Mattoon formations. When this quarry was accessible, brachiopods, nautiloids, ammonoids, crinoid (stems / cups), bryozoans, horn coral, trilobite pieces and shark teeth. At the road cuts, I was hoping for some of the same. (If you see that I identified something incorrectly, please advise). My first stop was along Route 71. I was able to collect on both sides of the road. The most abundant fossil that I found was the brachiopod "Composita argentia". If I was in the quarry, I could literally pick of hundreds of these in no time at all, but at this road cut I found about 20. I also found a couple of what I believe to be the brachiopod "Juresania nebrascensis". 1 piece of horn coral "Lophophillidum proliferum". 1 brachiopod which I believe to be "Punctospirifer kentuckyensis". A couple small crinoid stems and 1 small crinoid hash plate, which was not worth the taking, but I did. The second road cut was about 5 minutes down the road on Route 62. Unlike the first site, this area is very unstable and caution needs to be the first thing that you practice here; I would not suggest this are for smaller kids and people who are not sure-footed as the approach is steep, littered with loose rocks and the head wall is not secure. The matrix at this location appeared to be different and I did not find 1 of the common "Composita argentia". The most common at this site was the brachiopod that I believe to be "Juresania nebrascensis". A couple brachiopods that I believe are "Linoproductus cora". A few Spirifer brachiopods. And laslty- a couple crinoid stems. It was not a great haul and I do not think that I will be visiting either site again, but is was a great weather and what else is better than fossil collecting. Hope you enjoyed this report and again, please correct any mistakes that I most likely made.
  24. Sigillaria Tree Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sigillaria Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Sigillaria is a genus of extinct, spore-bearing, arborescent (tree-like) plants. It was a lycopodiophyte, and is related to the lycopsids, or club-mosses, but even more closely to quillworts, as was its associate Lepidodendron. This genus is known in the fossil records from the Late Carboniferous period but dwindled to extinction in the early Permian period (age range: from 383.7 to 254.0 million years ago). Fossils are found in United States, Canada, China, Korea, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Sigillariaceae Genus: †Sigillaria
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