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Found 266 results

  1. Greetings fellow fossil lovers! Below is an assortment of fossils from the Waurika clay from the Lower Permian that I'm having trouble placing an id on. Scale bar is in millimeters. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks All! Jacob
  2. I am leaving shortly to spend just over a week in England, more specifically in the Liverpool area, and will be taking a day trip along the coast of Wales to Rhyl as well. I've done some basic research and found that Liverpool sits right on top of Triassic bedrock, and Rhyl on top of Permian bedrock. Are there any sites that would be within my realm to visit and collect at? If so, are there any rules and regulations that I, an amateur from outside the country, need to know about before I go? If there are none, are there any noteworthy shops that I may be able to visit where I can buy some local specimens? I enjoy bringing home a fossil from my trips each time I travel somewhere, the more local the better. Thanks in advance!
  3. Our new Shark Education Displays

    Pictures first, full descriptions will follow Paleozoic Sharks and “Sharks”
  4. Possibly a scute?

    I found this small flat, disk shaped fossil in some matrix from Richard Spur (the Dolese quarry) in Oklahoma, which is Permian material. It kind of looks like a small scute to me, but not real sure. It also does look somewhat like some Pennsylvanian echinoid plates I have found. Any thoughts. The hash marks are 1mm. Thanks.
  5. Hi all! I've been active in the field for a bit but I've been MIA for a while, dealing with personal life. BUT I have come back online. Have some adventures I have yet to post. So if you're curious about the geology of that part of the world from the eyes of this Canadian hobbit, swing by my blog. Don't be shy and subscribe if you want to keep updated. I'll try to add some of the blog info in this forum too so that I can reach as many folks as possible so they can see the amazing stuff in my backyard. Blog URL: https://redleafz.blogspot.com Thanks!! - Keenan p.s. Little preview:
  6. Rostroconchia or Brachiopod?

    Howdy! I have a neat puzzle for the experts today! I know that rostrochonchia are not super easy to find... so I submit the follow picture. Most of the "shelled" creatures I unearth are brachiopods; cincinnetina meeki, Lepidocyclus, Rafinesquina...etc... HOWEVER! this specimen is unique to my collection. Found in northern Cincinnati - Upper Ordovician - The pronounced ridges are different than anything else found. Posted to an Ohio Fossil group, someone with a keen eye made the possibility of Rostroconchia. From my understanding these are not found often. Looking for help in identification. I do not have the tools at hand to remove anymore of the matrix without damage to the remaining fossils in the hash plate... (I have a dremel tools and dental pics...I'm lame) which are neat too. Rostrochonchia or Plaesiomys subquadratus (I compared to these specimens I had) As always, looking for education and conversation.
  7. Paramblypterus gelberti GOLDFUSS, 1847

    From the album Vertebrates

    Paramblypterus gelberti GOLDFUSS, 1847 Early Permian Jeckenbach Rhineland-Palatinate Germany
  8. Palaeoniscus freieslebeni Blainville, 1818

    From the album Vertebrates

    Palaeoniscus freieslebeni Blainville, 1818 Late Permian Copper Shale Richelsdorf Hessen Germany
  9. Amblypterus latus AGASSIZ, 1833

    From the album Vertebrates

    Amblypterus latus AGASSIZ, 1833 Early Permian Lebach Saarland Germany
  10. Claudiosaurus preparation

    Hi all, I have in my collection, two small complete Claudiosaurus in matrix skeletons, and one round concretion which I believe to contain a larger Claudiosaurus (yes, I know some may be skeptical). I am trying the freeze and thaw method to expose him (or her), and had a set back, as a section broke off at the edge, and another on the right edge. It is a large concretion.. about a foot diameter by 4 inches... just so you know the scale. The matrix looks to be more fragile then what I have seen in other video's.. ie, a heavy hammer strke would likely fragment it into many piece. Underneath the corner section which broke off, you can clearly see what I believe to be vertebrae, though the cleave from the freeze thaw didn't really cleave it in half.. it seemed to cleave in sections, not following the fossil. The right crack is removable, and there isn't any fossil visible under that section.. but it created a nice 'T' that could be chiseled down. The section I'm holding in my hand has split with the fossil on both sides, which is what I was hoping it was going to do the entire way.. The good news is, that the broken off piece has exposed more 'territory' for water to permeate along the fossil natural cleavage, I believe. Those with expertise here. Should I continue to soak several days, and then freeze again.. or, at this point.. hammer and chisel? I am afraid to try anything at this point.. but think the freeze and thaw least risky. I think this is quite a valuable fossil potentially. I have attached a photo of the concretion, and his 'little brother' one of my Claudio skeletons.
  11. Paramblypterus gelberti Goldfuss, 1847

    From the album Vertebrates

    Paramblypterus gelberti Goldfuss, 1847 Early Permian Jeckenbach Rhineland-Palatinate Germany
  12. Fort Apache Limestone finds

    While dissolving an unknown 2 inch long sponge from the Permian Fort Apache Member of the Schnebly Hill Formation from northern Gila County in Arizona I found several silicified brachiopods with spines. Several Bellaclathrus spinosus brachiopods were present ranging from 0.75 to 1.5 inch across and had spines as long as 1 inch. Thankfully some sort of sudden but gentle event buried the sponge and brachiopods preserving them for me to uncover.
  13. Discosauriscus austriacus

    Classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Order: Seymouriamorpha Family: Discosauriscidae Genus: discosauriscus Species: discosauriscus austriacus
  14. Marl Slate Fossil

    Found this in marl slate, any ideas on what it is fossil wise?
  15. I just added this wonderful specimen to my collection. The species is discosauriscus. Little is known about the species other than the fact that they were predators based off of teeth. They may of had electrospective organs. On this slab running through the head of the specimen is a thick calcite seam from where the rock was faulted and shifted. This was found in the Czech Rebublic in the Limnic Deposits. This is the first fossil I've purchased all the others in my collection I have found.
  16. Ord Perm Triassic Ammonite or ?

    In a recent trip to the Candelaria Mining district of west central Nevada some rocks that suggest fossil forms where found. Is this a fossil? How big where coiled Nautiloids in the Ordivician? Is this more likely Permo-Triassic? I have more pics but the file size limit. Maybe another post later. The rock formations in the area per Mineral, Deposita 29, 318-329 (1994) MINERALIUM DEPOSITA O Springer-Verlag 1994 The Candelaria silver deposit, Nevada - preliminary sulphur, oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry the basement consists of Ordovician cherts of the Palmetto complex; this is overlain unconformably by Permo-Triassic marine clastic sediments (Diablo and Candelaria Formations); these are structurally overlain by a serpentinitehosted tectonic melange (Pickhandle/Golconda allochthon); all these units are cut by three Mesozoic felsic dike systems. The local rock descriptions are obviously simplified. Palmetto Basin Assemblage - Shale, chert, quartzite, greenstone, and limestone Nolan Belt - Shale, chert, phyllite, quartzite, and limestone Diablo Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Sandstone, siltstone, limestone, conglomerate, and carbonaceous limestone Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Shale, sandstone, and limestone Candearia FM Golconda Terrane - Basinal, volcanogenic, terrigenous clastic, and minor carbonate rocks Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, and limestone Siliciclastic Overlap Assemblage - Shale, sandstone, and limestone Shale with interbedded sandstone and minor limestone characterize the Lower Triassic Candelaria Formation (Ferguson, Muller, and Cathcart, 1954).
  17. Hi folks, we bought a sample of microfossils originated from Waurika, Oklahoma. It was really fun to search through the little pile and try to ID the pieces. The result was a short video We decided to share it hoping for comments and more interesting info from the knowledgeable audience of this forum. What's really cool about microfossils is the amount of details and often stunning preservation of tiny pieces. Does anybody know a microfossil locality in Central California?
  18. ID 3 species in a Permian themed exhibit

    I just went to this traveling exhibit in a museum in a city where my brother lives that it is about the animals and life in the Permian period and I got pictures of 3 fossils, an ammonite, a trilobite and a crinoid but I don’t know what species and genus they are?
  19. I remember seeing Trackways in the Cocconino Sandstone as a kid in the Grand Canyon. These are not the ones I've seen before. Almost 100 years after the first paper out of the Grand Canyon is one describing an icnotaxa unexpected in the Permian desert. https://phys.org/news/2019-05-newly-fossil-footprints-paleontologists-rethink.amp
  20. Trimerorhachis skull?

    I found this in west Texas, in the Red Bed area. I was wondering if it could be an amphibian skull fossil of some kind. Maybe a trimerorhachis? I'm still learning about the extinct amphibians and reptiles in my state. Any suggestions are welcome!
  21. Temnospondyl help

    Here's a hard one: This is a very nice temnospondyl skeleton (you can see the sclerotic rings!). It measures about 11cm long from snout to what is preserved of the tail. My question is: Can anyone tell me the genus/species and provenance of the fossil? I was told by the previous owner that it was possibly Platyrhinops from the Lower Triassic of Germany, but I have no idea. It looks like maybe a very well preserved Permian age Discosauriscus from the Czech Republic or some sort of temnospondyly from the Pfalz of Germany. I am happy to share more photos. Thanks for the help :-)
  22. Hi everyone I think I just found a new hobby With my latest fossil delivery I recieved quite a lot of microfossils & matrix vials as the world of microfossils was something that I have been long interested in. So a 2 weeks ago I finally ordered my first microfossils for which I reserved a special drawer in my archive cabinet. So here is a recapp of what I all got: 3 vials of permian material from Waurika, Oklahoma 1 vial of permian material from The red beds of Archer County, Texas 1 small vial of Conodont rich Mississippian material from the Chappel Limestone formation, Texas 1 small vial of Cretaceous Lower Gault Clay, East Wear bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK A micropalaeontology slide with Jurassic Blue Lias matrix rich in holothurian material. A thin section of an Ostracods filled Elimia snail from the Green River Formation in Wyoming A thin section from the Rhynie chert of Scotland which should contain preserved parts of the plant Aglaophyton major and perhaps even other species. I also got a lot of Bull Canyon micro fossil teeth and 2 cretaceous mammal teeth from Hell Creek In this topic you will be able to follow my path through this newly discovered hobby as I will post my finds and progress Currently I am only working with a clip-on cellphone microscope, but I do plan on getting a professional microscope in the next few months! (Tips are always welcome) So let's put on our Ant-Man suit and explore the microfossil realm So here are some of the first pictures I made of some of the microfossils Starting with the thin slices! Thin slice with Ostracon filled Elimia tenara snail from the Green River Formation, Wyoming Thin slice with Aglaophyton major from Rhynie Chert in Scotland
  23. Hi! I recently acquired a few new additions to my permian collection, but there are a few pieces of which I am not a 100 % whether they are ID'd correctly, simply because I am not yet knowlegdeable about the material. So I thought it might be a good idea to post the ones I am doubtfull about here, as I know there are a lot of people more knowlegdeable than me who probably could ID them. The first item is a small claw listed as "juvenile dimetrodon limbatus" from the Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA I was a bit doubtfull when they said "juvenile" dimetrodon claw, but I got it anyway because it's a very nice permian claw which was an okay price regardless the ID. The second item is a caudal vertebra that was listed as "Edaphosaurus" (from the Archer City Formation, Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA) which came as a set along with a piece of sail spine which without doubt belongs to Edaphosaurus. The last items were sold as a collection of "Eryops megacephalus" fossils from the Wellington garbar complex, Waurika, Okhlahoma. From left to right are a piece of skull plate, a toe bone, a piece of dermal armor and a tooth.
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