Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'permian'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 246 results

  1. I remember seeing Trackways in the Cocconino Sandstone as a kid in the Grand Canyon. These are not the ones I've seen before. Almost 100 years after the first paper out of the Grand Canyon is one describing an icnotaxa unexpected in the Permian desert. https://phys.org/news/2019-05-newly-fossil-footprints-paleontologists-rethink.amp
  2. Trimerorhachis skull?

    I found this in west Texas, in the Red Bed area. I was wondering if it could be an amphibian skull fossil of some kind. Maybe a trimerorhachis? I'm still learning about the extinct amphibians and reptiles in my state. Any suggestions are welcome!
  3. Temnospondyl help

    Here's a hard one: This is a very nice temnospondyl skeleton (you can see the sclerotic rings!). It measures about 11cm long from snout to what is preserved of the tail. My question is: Can anyone tell me the genus/species and provenance of the fossil? I was told by the previous owner that it was possibly Platyrhinops from the Lower Triassic of Germany, but I have no idea. It looks like maybe a very well preserved Permian age Discosauriscus from the Czech Republic or some sort of temnospondyly from the Pfalz of Germany. I am happy to share more photos. Thanks for the help :-)
  4. Hi everyone I think I just found a new hobby With my latest fossil delivery I recieved quite a lot of microfossils & matrix vials as the world of microfossils was something that I have been long interested in. So a 2 weeks ago I finally ordered my first microfossils for which I reserved a special drawer in my archive cabinet. So here is a recapp of what I all got: 3 vials of permian material from Waurika, Oklahoma 1 vial of permian material from The red beds of Archer County, Texas 1 small vial of Conodont rich Mississippian material from the Chappel Limestone formation, Texas 1 small vial of Cretaceous Lower Gault Clay, East Wear bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK A micropalaeontology slide with Jurassic Blue Lias matrix rich in holothurian material. A thin section of an Ostracods filled Elimia snail from the Green River Formation in Wyoming A thin section from the Rhynie chert of Scotland which should contain preserved parts of the plant Aglaophyton major and perhaps even other species. I also got a lot of Bull Canyon micro fossil teeth and 2 cretaceous mammal teeth from Hell Creek In this topic you will be able to follow my path through this newly discovered hobby as I will post my finds and progress Currently I am only working with a clip-on cellphone microscope, but I do plan on getting a professional microscope in the next few months! (Tips are always welcome) So let's put on our Ant-Man suit and explore the microfossil realm So here are some of the first pictures I made of some of the microfossils Starting with the thin slices! Thin slice with Ostracon filled Elimia tenara snail from the Green River Formation, Wyoming Thin slice with Aglaophyton major from Rhynie Chert in Scotland
  5. Hi! I recently acquired a few new additions to my permian collection, but there are a few pieces of which I am not a 100 % whether they are ID'd correctly, simply because I am not yet knowlegdeable about the material. So I thought it might be a good idea to post the ones I am doubtfull about here, as I know there are a lot of people more knowlegdeable than me who probably could ID them. The first item is a small claw listed as "juvenile dimetrodon limbatus" from the Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA I was a bit doubtfull when they said "juvenile" dimetrodon claw, but I got it anyway because it's a very nice permian claw which was an okay price regardless the ID. The second item is a caudal vertebra that was listed as "Edaphosaurus" (from the Archer City Formation, Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA) which came as a set along with a piece of sail spine which without doubt belongs to Edaphosaurus. The last items were sold as a collection of "Eryops megacephalus" fossils from the Wellington garbar complex, Waurika, Okhlahoma. From left to right are a piece of skull plate, a toe bone, a piece of dermal armor and a tooth.
  6. Hello! I'm new to fossil collecting (as well as this forum) and have bought my first fossil today. Being completely inexperienced, I thought I'd try asking folks on this forum whether the fossil I bout is authentic. I am somewhat skeptical of this crinoid fossil's authenticity given how well the crinoids themselves seem to be preserved in the substrate. They almost look like they're made out of potting clay and are very crisp. Could anyone with experience give their input? This fossil was a significant investment so I'd like to at least know I got what I paid for! Thanks in advance.
  7. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00744-3
  8. Dimetrodon footprints found on P.E.I. bring Island to 'world stage' of paleontology https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-fossil-footprints-discovered-cavendish-park-1.5027811 Laura Macneil discovered the footprints on this rock in Cavendish in May. (Isabella Zavarise/CBC)
  9. My brother found this years ago in the flinthills region of Kansas. He lost it for years, and just re-discovered it in some storage. I know next to nothing about things like this. Can anyone give me an I'd, or any info I can pass on to him?
  10. Hello all. Please help me decide on my next acquisition. I have the opportunity to buy a Permian reptile. The seller has both a captorhinus and Labidosaurus. Both are free from the matrix and prepped on a limestone display base. Similar in size. Is one more rare than the other? Not too much info on these. They were obtained from OK. Thanks
  11. Permian Reptile Vertebra ID

    Hi, looking for some thoughts on identification of a fossil I bought a while ago. This is a fairly well preserved vertebra from an early reptile of some kind. Unfortunately I lost the original label for it so all I can say is that it’s from 300-250 mya, and from a formation in Oklahoma or Texas. I’m not very experienced with Permian stuff, so I’m not sure where to begin. Thanks for any help!
  12. Our last post left off just before the Permian so this is where the students will learn about the series extinction events known as The Great Dying. One of the really interesting points in shark evolution is the survival of sharks during this period. They survived by adapting to a vastly different climate and a much different aquatic world. This is when the Hydobonts really emerge and the age of the modern shark starts. The first species we cover are the xenacanthids. We originally placed the Eel Sharks in the Golden Age of Sharks section but I wanted to illustrate that some that while a few xenacanthid sharks survived the Permian extinction, they died off shortly after. They were apex predators in freshwater ecosystems until 266 mya. The adaptations we hit on are the forked teeth and eel like body. Despite being an apex predator and some initially surviving the Permian, they were unable to survive long term either due to being unable to adapt to long term changes in the aquatic environments they formally dominated or were out competed by animals better adapted or both. The Hybodonts first start appearing in the fossil record in the Carboniferous era and much of the diversity of the family was lost during Permian but Hybodonts would became the dominant shark of the Triassic and lasted until the Miocene. They were varied in form, size, and habitat. Hybodont sharks lived in freshwater environments and marine environments. They are known from fossil formations that are shallow and deep. They evolved to fill a variety of ecological niches. They had different kinds of teeth for different kinds of prey. We specifically touch on Hybodus obtusus, Lissodes minimus, and the tiny, fairly recently described Reticulodus synergus as those are the species we have. My son's early sketch of Reticulodus is super cool. Given that this is smallest shark we are discussing, the art work is the hook more than the micro fossil. This is the one spot in the shark program that is a little visually underwhelming from a fossil standpoint. We have only a few small items so it lacks the visual appeal of the weirdness of earlier sharks and the WOW effect of the giant sharks that follow. This is a very fixable issue for us. I found a source for Orthacanthus teeth and we are planning on picking up a nice dentition set to go with our partial spine. Carter drew his Orthacanthus in a position that will match the dentition and spine when we have the teeth. A weakness now will be a visual strength in a month or two. I would really love to pick up an Anstercanthus tooth and spine too. They seem to be out there on the market from time to time. We plan on grabbing a few more Lissodes teeth and Reticulodus teeth too. A number of small teeth can make a nice display. Here are the fossils we currently have for the presentation Pic 1 Orthacanthus texanus tooth and partial spine of an unidentified Orthacanthus. Both are from Oklahoma I believe. Pic 2 Hybodus obtusus tooth. A small tooth and one that needs some additional material. Pic 3 A picture of all the fossils for the presentation including Lissodes minimus and Reticulodus synergus. Yup the dots are cool shark teeth lol I actually love the tiny sharks and this will be one of my favorite spots in the presentation because we deliver these right before we get into the giant animals that follow.
  13. Permian and Miocene micros

    Unfortunately I am still waiting to be called back to work. I have been trying to find things to do to occupy my time. Last week was tough due to brutally cold temps. Finally we have hit a warm spell as yesterday and today hit somewhere in the 50's. I tried fishing for a few hours, but the snow melt raised the water levels and made the creeks muddy. Atleast it was a beautiful day to be outdoors. When I got home I decided to finish looking through some Permian micro matrix from Waurika, Oklahoma. I got this from @Fossildude19 who got some from @Jeffrey P . While I did not find a lot of fossils in this batch, I did find a few teeth. I found one very small Orthacanthas tooth, which I was really hoping I would and a few which I am not sure about. Also last night I finished going through the last bit of matrix from Sharktooth Hill, which I got from @caldigger in an auction lot that I won. This matrix was extremely loaded with fossils. First up is a pic of the Permian teeth.
  14. CP petrified wood

    a new side of pertrified wood in north china. every where scattered. May fall off the cliff on to cars passing by beneath. big or thin one can not step into the same river for a second time, but a log could lay down in water again, after 300 million years. the vascular tissue under scope
  15. Permian footprint fossil

    permian footprint fossil anyone know speices and location?
  16. algal mat?

    Hello all. I picked up this fossil in a Permian formation on the Potash Road, unpaved section, SW of Moab. I think I can eliminate what it is not but am unsure of what it is. I do not think it is some kind of sponge. It does seem to have the structure of coral. It does not it seem to be like any bryozoan clusters I’ve seen. If that is correct, this begins to narrow it to bacterial. The fossil material is very thin overlaying a hard red clay base, so I don’t think it is a stromatolite. It does not come in layers, but seems to be just one layer. The piece is 4cm x 4cm x 4cm. The fingers in the third picture give a good sense of scale. The most distinctive feature is the tooth like ridge just to the left of the red dot in the first picture. The second picture shows the thinness of the fossil level and the other pictures show the roughness of the surface. I wonder if it might be an algae mat of some sort. I looked at posts on the forum dealing with algae mats and similar and find things loosely similar but not conclusive to my untrained eyes. If it is an algae mat, it may be a fossilized cyanobacterial piece. At this point I’d like help just putting it into the broad category of what it is, which will direct further research. More pictures available if anyone wants. If you have ideas, thanks for sharing. And if they come with some reference source, even better. Thanks. Tom
  17. Stone, P. and McCarthy, D., 2018. Were the Falkland Islands hit by a giant asteroid 250 million years ago?. Falkland Islands Journal, 11(2), pp.42-54. http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/521520/ http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/521520/1/STONE AND MCCARTHY FIJ 2018pp 42-54.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  18. Fossils Unexpectedly Discovered in Jordan Change Paradigm of Plant Evolution Paleobotanists thought seed plants evolved after the Permian mass extinction, but fossils of early pine trees and other gymnosperms found by the Dead Sea alter timeline. Haaretz, Ruth Schuster, December 25, 2018 https://www.haaretz.com/science-and-health/.premium-fossils-unexpectedly-discovered-in-jordan-change-paradigm-of-plant-evolution-1.6783472 Middle East fossils push back origin of key plant groups millions of years By Elizabeth Pennisi, Science https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/12/middle-east-fossils-push-back-origin-key-plant-groups-millions-years Blomenkemper, P., Kerp, H., Hamad, A.A., DiMichele, W.A. and Bomfleur, B., 2018. A hidden cradle of plant evolution in Permian tropical lowlands. Science, 362(6421), pp.1414-1416. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6421/1414 Yours, Paul H.
  19. Permian crinoid

    Hello helpful fossiliers, Help please. These fossils came from outside Moab close to the Colorado River, but on a high shelf. The river is not visible from this location. Roadside Geology of Utah identifies this area as Permian, as did a BLM paleontologist. They are from about 10-15 miles SW from Moab. The rocks are largely a red base (clay?) with a gray-er surface. These three pictures are actually 3 different locations on the rock, but I think (wonder if) they are the same life form. The first is about 2 mm long. The ruler shows a mm scale. You can see the cross section end of the item on the fossil closest to the ruler. The second is a round disc from elsewhere on the surface and the third is a connected series of round discs. My sense is that the disc and connect discs are crinoid segments. Is the first picture also a crinoid, or am I way off on all this? I can post additional pictures if anyone asks. Thanks. Tom
  20. Gerster Fm. Productid Brachiopods

    This particular species had spines attached to the shell which is not all that common. There are four spines attached on the thumbnail brachiopod. The holes in the shells were where spines used to be attached. Found during this trip here:
  21. additions to ichnological knowledge

    Buchwitz Michael Buchwitz and Sebastian Voigt On the Morphological variability of Ichniotherium tracks and the evolution of locomotion in the sistergroup of amniotes DOI 10.7717/peerj.4346 Copyright 2018 Buchwitz and Voigt Distributed under Creative Commons CC Please take note:LARGE,35 MB category: somewhere beyond awesome
  22. Who's Permian feet made these?

    If anyone is familiar with Permian tracks, can anyone ID these? All I can tell is that they appear to be synapsid tracks, but not Dimetrodon. I'm assuming that means Edaphosaurus is out too, but that's all I can figure. the ONLY details still known are that they're Permian tracks from somewhere in Arizona. There's no more information available. There's 4 plates... 1-pic 1 2-pics 2,3,4 3-pics 5 4-pics 6,7
  23. https://www.sbs.com.au/news/earliest-herbivorous-reptile-fossil-found
  24. Hungry boy

    Here is a hungry boy from the Permian that I drew.Not yet sure if I like the way I drew the sand clouds, and I think that using pen for the final product was definitely a mistake, but otherwise it is okay.
  25. Hi guys! This is a continuation of a previous post focusing just on the sponges. These fossils are from the Capitan Formation, which is Permian Period, Guadalupian Epoch, Capitanian Stage. Because these fossils are in the park, no collecting was allowed, and I can't provide additional images. Any confirmations about the identification or suggestions about a more specific identification are welcome. This trilobite is the only fossil out of these images that was actually found in Carlsbad Caverns, right behind the elevator. Can I get more specific on an ID? Cross section of rugose coral? Sponge? Bryozoan. Acanthocladia? Bryozoan? Crinoid.
×