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  1. FossilizedJello

    Big Brook, NJ Toe bone (Phalanx) ID

    Here are all my finds from big brook. WHAT A DAY ...arrowheads,toe bones, big shark teeth, misc I just need the toe bone ID
  2. garyc

    Mammal phalanx

    I think I know what this is, but will hold off until other input is given..... found on the Brazos River in Texas, Pleistocene @Harry Pristis @Lorne Ledger @fossilus
  3. Spinodude

    Morrison Formation toe ID

    Got a bit of a potential challenge here today! I recently bought this little toe bone (phalanx or metatarsal I guess) online. It was cheap, I guess because it doesn't have anything in terms of location/age other than Morrison Formation. It is about 6 cm long, 6-ish on its widest point and about 5 high at the highest point. It is quite heavy and stubby. Slightly distorted at the front and the circular parts at the front are partially worn off. Has a piece knocked out of it. Which is kind of neat because you can see the internal bone structure in that part. But the main question of c
  4. ozajko

    Pleistocene phalanx bones

    Hello. I have found 3 phalanx bones. Iv found them in river where i have already found bones of mammals like rhino or mammoth, in middle Europe. Thank You for any help in identifying Found in Central Poland.
  5. Shellseeker

    Sm Medial Phalanx

    aa Could be small horse, camel, tapir, but not Equus which would be much larger. See Harry's picture in this thread. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/76550-middle-phalanx-fossil-id/&page=2 or his Tapir bones in this one.. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/79479-medial-phalanx/ Thanks for all responses.
  6. ajgus

    Hadrosaur Phalanx?

    I'm wondering what this is. My best (non-expert) guess is that it is a toe bone of some sort. It's about a couple inches (appx. 5cm) in length & equally wide. It resembles some smaller Hadrosaur phalanges I've come across, but that is just a guess. To the best of my knowledge, it hails from Hell Creek. Any thoughts? Thanks in advance!
  7. jamhill

    A few things I’m not sure on

    All found on the beach in Jacksonville Beach FL like twenty years ago. Area known to produce Pleistocene mammals. 1. Thinking sloth phalanx. Note proximal epiphysis is missing/unfused. If it is sloth, does anyone known what kind? Is it medial? 2. Guess is bison first lower premolar 3. Equus sesamoids? Any help is appreciated.
  8. Reebs

    Phalanx fossils?

    Hello, These seem match an ID of phalanx fossils. They were both found in Manatee County, Florida. Any telling what they are from? Smaller one is 3” long and larger one is 3.25” long. many thanks, Marie
  9. Alex Eve

    Toe/Finger bone?

    I found this half of a phalanx bone in the upper Dinosaur Park Formation. I’m wondering whether it belongs to a turtle or a small theropod. Would any of you guys know what it is? Thanks!
  10. FF7_Yuffie

    Kem Kem Claw and Phalanx

    Seller doesn't know what it's from beyond claw and phalanx from Kem Kem in Morocco. Price is pretty good, so it tempts me if anyone has any idea what it's from. I have seen these crop up as raptor claws or deltadromeus claws elsewhere--which to me seems more speculative putting a name to it than it actually being from one of those species. But if anyone knows anything, that would be great.
  11. Shellseeker

    Raptor toe bone

    http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/83952-toe-bone-possible-predator/ Very interesting toe bone. It seems very similar to the phalanx in the above thread. However it is longer and not as robust. While no guarantees ever, I find few horse teeth, but the ratio is 10 pre_Equus to 1 Equus. Definitely Pliocene/Miocene indicators.
  12. PODIGGER

    Equus - Seeking confirmation

    Found this bone in the Peace River early last week. I believed it to be a mammal toe bone or something similar. After hunting for comparisons here, on line and from texts I have on hand I believe it to be an Equus medial phalanx. The size in millimeters is approximately 40.1 X 40.3 x 23.5. I would appreciate any input confirming or pointing me in another direction. Thanks for taking a look!
  13. Still_human

    Pteranodon wing (reverse side close up)

    From the album: Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Sadly this one broke while removing it from packaging, even with great care. Thankfully a beautifully clean break with no fragments or even visible dust! Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box
  14. Still_human

    Pteranodon wing display

    From the album: Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?
  15. Still_human

    pteranodon wing

    From the album: Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Sadly the phalanx(?) broke a bit during unpacking, despite the extreme care. Very happily however, it was all perfectly clean, without a single fragment, or even visible speck of dust! Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage
  16. Still_human

    Pteranodon wing (closer up)

    From the album: Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?
  17. Still_human

    Pteranodon wing (reverse sides)

    From the album: Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?
  18. Still_human

    Pteranodon wing (phalanx close-up)

    From the album: Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?
  19. Flx

    Bissekty toe bones

    Hi I know that there are almost no publications about the dinosaurs from the Bissekty formation. However, I was wondering if it is still possible to narrow down these two bones? I am specificatlly interested in the left one. Could it be a Tyrannosaur or Therizinosaur phalanx?
  20. Lizzlo

    Bison Toe Bone?

    Hello! I recently came back from a trip to the Netherlands, and while beach combing in the North Sea, I found this bone. I've been really curious as to what it may be, and even joined this site in hopes of discovering what it may have belonged too. I believe it's a phalanx bone, possibly of a bison from the pleistocene? That's really just a guess based off of others' pictures, so please, any info you can give would be wonderful! Sorry I don't have a ruler on hand for proper measurements, but it is roughly 8 cm in length and 3 cm in width. I put the lighter there to maybe give an idea of
  21. msantix

    Spinosaurid hand phalanx?

    Hi, Wanted to ask whether this hand phalanx bone resembles a Spinosaurid hand phalanx or whether it might be something else like from a croc or another theropod group (it looks somewhat hollow). It is quite a large bone at about 24.5cm in length and is from the kem kem (it has also had some small repair work). Thanks in advance.
  22. I_gotta_rock

    Whale Phalanx

    From the album: Calvert Cliffs

    Baleen Whale Phalanx Bone Parvorder Mysticeti Miocene Virginia
  23. doushantuo

    something in the way it moved

    ajslocomeigenshmathemaquantmethodrose93.11Macleod.pdf Norman Macleod and Kenneth D.Rose: Inferring locomotor behavior in Paleogene mammals via eigenshape analysis American Journal of Science,v.293-A,1993 Given that the Paleogene was a time of incipient mammal diversification...
  24. Shellseeker

    A Large Toe Bone

    I found this bone in the same spot that I found a Mastodon Tooth yesterday , which obviously does not mean a lot.. It is a toe bone and decent size , about 2.5 inches. Hopefully someone will recognize.
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