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Found 44 results

  1. Millerosteus minor Miller, 1858

    From the album Vertebrates

    Millerosteus minor Miller, 1858 Middle Devonian Eifelian Caithness Scotland Millerosteus minor (named after Hugh Miller, a Scottish geologist and paleontologist 1802-1856) was a small arthrodire placoderm, rarely exceeding 15cm. The extinct armored fishes known as placoderms make up what is considered to be the earliest branch of the gnathostome family tree -- the earliest branch of the jawed fishes. Arthrodires possessed jaws but no teeth. Razor-sharp bony dental plates formed sort of a beak and allowed to gnaw on prey. Arthrodires (“jointed neck”) are characterized by an unusual joint in the dorsal armor between the head and neck regions; this joint apparently allowed the head to move upwards as the jaw dropped downwards, creating a larger gape. In addition, it also had an internal joint between its neck vertebrae and the back of the skull, allowing for the mouth to be opened even wider and being able to feed on rather large prey. Millerosteus probably fed on invertebrates such as crustaceans and mollusks or even was a mud-grubber that ingested organic-rich mud for its food. Arthrodires possessed a heavily armored head- and neck-region. The slender fish-like body and the heterocercal tail that extends behind the heavily armored portion is, because it is almost naked or only covered with small scales, rarely preserved. Millerosteus is a rather common fish in the Middle Devonian flagstones around Caithness.
  2. Placoderm bones/armour?

    Hi is there any possible way this could be pieces of Placoderm armour or bones? There very different from what I usually find in the area and seem to be vertebrate in origin if it’s not geologic.
  3. We thought sharks' cartilaginous skeletons existed because endochondral bone evolved after sharks branched off the family tree, but this Placoderm common ancestor of sharks and bony fishes has bone. This indicates that sharks may have lost the ability to make endochondral bone. https://phys.org/news/2020-09-ancient-bony-fish-rethink-sharks.html
  4. Just got back from a 5 day trip to western NSW where we visited a number of sites, some of which we had not visited before. Will post more photos and information over the next few days as I have a lot to photograph, but here are some field shots from day two (our first collecting day)... Our first site was located near Grenfell and is known for its excellent Devonian fish fauna, including placoderms and sarcopterygians. While not as well preserved as the nearby Canowindra site, these are collectable which is a start . We were only given a vague site on a hillside located on private property, so once we had permission to access the site the next issue was finding where the fossil bearing layers were. This involved climbing a very steep hill and breaking open any rocks we saw, and after finding evidence of placoderm plates the next task was to figure out where they originated. A number of fossil bearing layers were found and it seems the material is very extensively distributed, presumably occurring throughout the surrounding hills as well. Here are some photos of one rock face we worked and the terrain - There were a number of rocks with exposed fossils on them, for example this one which is covered in ornamentation from placoderm plates. And here is a field photo of a partial Sarcopterygian(?) jaw, my thumb is on the left for scale.
  5. Fishing in the Devonian

    Last weekend we were invited by a few friends to joint hem on a fieldtrip in Famennian ( Late Devonian ) deposits in Belgium. They sometimes visit this place specifically to look for Devonian plant material. Although paleobatany is not our cup of tea they convinced us to come along because they had also found fish remains from time to time, so we tagged along in the hope to find some Devonian fish. At first we didn’t find much apart from the plant material, but one of our friends led us to a boulder where he had seen some fish scales on a previous visit. And indeed, after closer inspection we saw a big scale on the surface, but also a fish tooth from a Dipneustes. So once we knew what to look for we checked out different layers with the same correlation as the one where we had the first fish remains. It didn’t take us long after that to find a deposit where we found other fish remains, although the layer was hard to get to we did find some loose rocks from there that we cracked open with good results. Finally we got home with multiple scales from Holoptychi and Tristichopterids, a few Dipneustes teeth and we even found a quite impressive Arthrodire placoderm jaw. Most of this material was really brittle and we had to consolidate most of the specimens before extracting them. I would say not a bad catch for a first try at famennian fish Field pictures: This is an overview of some of the best finds from that day: dipnoi teeth: Tristichopterid: Holoptychius: The placoderm jaw:
  6. Placoderm material from New York?

    Found this nice slate blue piece in my recent trip to Western New York. What do you guys think? The piece isn’t very big, maybe half an inch - but it looks relatively thick, maybe a centimeter and a half?
  7. Small placoderm or fish

    So I found these bones in a block of Bois Blanc fm., which dates this to around the middle Devonian. When it was found the block was in several pieces which at the time I didn't realize was associated, but upon further inspection I found the pieces fit together. Interestingly the fossils are not layered and appear at random depths throughout the block, not just in one layer. Because of this I think there may be more to be discovered in the rock. I tried prepping a smaller bone fragment out, but it turns out the bone is much softer than the matrix and the bone fragment is now many fragments. I won't "prep" any more of this to avoid further damage but I was wondering if there was anything diagnostic in here?
  8. Today on a hunt in the lower devonian of new york, I found on of the most unusual piece and I can't decide if its bryzoan or possible placoderm.
  9. Placoderm Fish with Fin?

    I found this fossil in Devonian rock in Johnson County, Iowa. I think it is a fossil of a placoderm fish, and I think it has a "fin" next to the quarter in the photo. The fin would be coming out of the placoderm plate at a perpendicular angle, which would make sense, but I have never found a fin before. I will attach a close-up photo of the "fin" below. Am I on the right track or is this something else? Thank you! Ben
  10. Unknown Acquisition

    I bought a small fossil collection that contained several Erismatopterus levatus and it also contained several unidentifiable and unlabeled items, in particular this piece. It reminds me almost of a placoderm skull plate, but I honestly don't have any idea. There's area of denticles on the side of the fossil.
  11. Devonian placoderm?

    Hi all! I pulled this fossil out of Red Hill, a Devonian site in central Pennsylvania. I thought it looks like it could possibly be part of a placoderm but I’d love to get some help with further identification. Thanks in advance!
  12. Leicester Pyrite Member. This layer between the Windom and the Geneseo black shale represents a sea of death. I find very few types of fossils in this hard to process layer of solid pyrite. Well preserved cephalopods and Placoderm armor (Placodermi is a class of armored prehistoric fish) are the most common fossils found. This very thin horizon can be easily found in the outcrop if you just look for rust dripping down and staining the grey shales below this pyrite layer. Every year or two, a piece of Leicester Pyrite will fall from its position high up in the outcrop and slide down to the creeks edge. It takes a lot of work to process the pyrite for fossils. Every blow with your hammer delivers the strong smell of sulfur and a ton of sparks. The reward for all this patience and hard work are fossils preserved in brilliant fools gold. This unit is also the only rocks in my area that routinely contain the armor of Placoderm fish. Click this link for a detailed description of this unusual formation - http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.835.6976&rep=rep1&type=pdf&fbclid=IwAR0qdFymJq-Hd1_SqU3j3yDw5Trl0ih_KohTv-26Du3b1m9g9s2IYKlW0Xc
  13. Schoharie quarry devonian - placoderm?

    Hey everyone, I am curious if this is a placoderm armor plate. It is from Schoharie quarry, NY. Thanks.
  14. Arkona placoderm?

    I was wondering if a complete or fairly complete placoderm skull/head has ever been found at Arkona? I am just curious as what this would look like, and because I have a few placoderm bits and pieces myself, pictures of such a fossil could possibly help me to figure out where these pieces came from. (This is mostly out of curiosity though because I know small placoderm bits are basically impossible to identify)
  15. Can this be identified as Dunkleosteus? It's from Ashtabula, Ohio on auction site.
  16. This is continuing the first post. The Tioga site is a near shore exposure of the entire Catskill formation. So besides the general Holoptychius and bothriolepis fauna, lungfish have been described from a skull table and tooth plates. Here is a tooth plate from Dipterous fliescheri. A similar plate was described from the Troy, PA area.
  17. Paulding, OH (Dev.) 7/28/19

    Found the usual goodies at Paulding today. But I'll only show this photo of a nice, thick chunk of Placoderm armor. This is embedded in hard limestone, so I think it's from the underlying Dundee Limestone Fm., rather than the Silica Shale Fm. (For those unfamiliar with the Paulding Locality, these are quarry dump piles). This is one of two placoderm pieces I found today. The color alone makes this a desirable find, let alone the cool factor of what it is.
  18. Bone piece from Penn Dixie

    I had a chance to visit Penn-Dixie today and one of my first finds stumped me. It has the signature porous inside of a bone. It’s black. It has radiating lines down one side. Folks running the place thought it was likely a piece a placoderm armor, making it a rare find. Apologies for the pictures. Once again I find myself in a hotel with my phone. Thickness is a bit over a quarter inch. Length is around 1.75”. Couldn’t make the phone focus well on the marrow. Does placoderm armor have marrow?
  19. Back during an April trip to the Widder Formation (Mid-Devonian), I came upon a rather sizeable placoderm. It is very likely the arthrodire, Protitanichthys sp., although it is a bit of wastebasket taxon, but new research is underway. It was pretty much stuck in this rock, and it was only going to come out the hard way. I collected every little bit I could find from that dirty, messy bench, including the impression. Here is the in situ photo:
  20. It's been about five months since I've been able to get out and dig, so when my collecting comrade and I arranged it, off we went. The weather was perfect, although it was muddy going. Spent about a day and a half at our site. Finds were not the best for some species, but the focus was more on site preparation. Pictured here are some Greenops widderensis. Both are missing parts, so will likely be in the grafting pile:
  21. Although we are currently in the depths of February, spring is just around the corner! With spring comes spring break and a week of digging!! One of the locations I am planning a visit to is Jamesville quarry in Jamesville NY. I would love to unearth some nice placoderm pieces. If anybody has info about the site, especially who to contact for permission, I'd greatly appreciate it!
  22. Somewhat fishy

    Ahoi, I just finished a model of Dunkleosteus the lazy way, because I don´t have that much time these days. Lazy way means: Skull is a bought model from kaiyodo dinotales, postcranial is a skeletal drawing by Scott Hartmann I modified slightly and printed on some transparent foil. Like the outcome. It is quite small though, only 15 cm, representing a meager 3m in my chosen scale. can anyone tell what the other two are? both recent species, one handmade after a photograph, the other 3d printed from ct data. As I don´t know if I can add tags after posting , I just added the ones I may put in this thread if I ever find the time to build them. After all my Whales, other marine Mammals , Birds and Reptiles I thought it would be nice if I could include some more Reptiles and "Amphibians" (?) If it crossed the border between land and sea, its likeness shall be built by me -some day. -Placodus -Cyamodus -Mastodonsaurus -Tiktaalik -Ichthyostega -Diplocaulus Aloha, J
  23. Dunkleosteus armor/possible jaws

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Front side of armor which I believe could be the edge of the jaws! It comes to what would have been the razor sharp shearing edge, greatly worn down now, though. I also believe it could be the jaw because of the clear vertical wear lines on the surface, from being sheared against the inner surface of the other jaw, which is how they kept the edges razor sharp like scissors. I have seen similar wear lines on placoderm shearing jaws, so what I believe to be reasonable observations point to the possibility(maybe even likely?)of being from the cutting edge of the jaws.
  24. Dunkleosteus armor cross section

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Cross section of dunkleosteus' armor plate showing internal structure of mostly solid bone
  25. Dunkleosteus armor

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Part of dunkleosteus' amazing armored head
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