Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'plant material'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 4 results

  1. 1930s collection

    I got this box of fossil from auction at the low price of £21. The collection is old and dates between 1933 and 1944 . Some of the collection has labels but sadly others are lost or mixed up. Most of the locations are from Yorkshire but there is also Oxfordshire and the midlands. I purchased this lot because of the small collection of corals. The some of the corals have been cut and polished. I did re-polished most of them because they seamed to have a coating to finish the process. There is also some nice plant material from coal seams it is good to get this material from now in the Uk lost localities . Please if anyone can help me fill in the blanks I have added locations I have the labels too, Robin Hoods Bay, Leeds, Wakefield , Whitby , Buckinghamshire and Midlands. I will do a better list of locations when Mrs R gets home because I can’t read some of the hand writing. I think it is a great little collection. Thanks for looking. Cheers Bobby corals 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8)
  2. this one is really weird, I think it may be a rolled up something not sure what...any ideas?.
  3. Possibly Coral-like Invertebrate? ID Request

    Hi everyone! I have attached some photos of my first ever fossils! I've been finding fossils of this same species in this one riverbank for years, and have always wanted to know what they are. I did some research- looked through sites detailing some of the more common fossils, and image searches of coral fossils since the texture seemed kinda reminiscent- but nothing seemed to me to look anything like it. I tried to guess with the coral thing, but honestly I can't even place these as animal or plant with any confidence. So now I've come to this awesome site! Thank you all for putting your time into helping people like me out with this, I really appreciate it. I'd love to here any ideas you have! Here's what I do know: When- on the geological map, this area was right on the border between Cretaceous and the indistinguishable riot of eras in the Rocky Mountains that was usually labeled simply Undifferentiated Mesozoic. Where- In a bank of river rocks on the shore of the Clearwater River, in the eastern foothills of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in Alberta, northwest of Sundre. Some Observations- some are circular, some are like a long slug shape, and some are somewhere in between like an elongated circle. The textures/patterns are all similar between them, and I suspect they may be related? The idea occurred to me that the circular ones may simply be slug-shapes seen in cross-section. Whatever they are, there are sure a lot of them- I find a few types of fossil out there, but these are by far the most numerous. I have a single large rock that must have several dozen of various sixes and shapes. Other fossils found there appear in the exact same type of rock, with dark grey background and white fossils. Some of these fossils have vaguely resembled limpets and chitons or other similar-looking creatures, with distinctly grooved shells like a mollusk, possibly supporting the idea that this might be from an aquatic habitat. There is a distinct directionality in the slug-shaped ones- the texture on the 'head' is more even and regularly rounded, while the 'tail' texture is more spiky and elongated. Most have fewer/fainter holey texturing toward the middle of the 'body', but some have holes through the whole thing. The largest is a bit over 3 cm long. Let me know if you need anything else from me! I can provide more pictures, if you feel that would be helpful. I'm very excited to here back from you! Thanks in advance, and have a nice day.
  4. It's so much fun when you unpack your fossils from a trip, sit down with a smug self satisfied look on your face and then suddenly you say loudly. HEY! Where is the plate with the spots? And my Equisetum? You dash over to the unpacked, unwashed, moulding pile of camping gear that should have been cleaned up days ago, dig around in it, and there it is! Another box of fossils! Yahoo more things to show my buddies on the forum. This is my trove from the Eocene Lake deposits of Princeton B.C. Canada. The very cool thing about the fossils at this location according to Dr. Ruth Stockey's research, the fossils are permineralized. Unlike the compression fossils many of us are used to, these fossils have had their mass replaced by silica. From her article she says" they are preserved in 3 dimensions in a solid matrix of silica that formed from the infiltration of the intercellular spaces and cells with silicic acid - a process that resulted from periodic volcanic eruptions" According to this book, sometimes you can't really see the fossil unless you etch it with hydrofloric acid. Hmmm.. Do I have any of that lying around? I have a little stale vinegar. Maybe I'll leave that process to the experts. Here are the cool things from box #7 This looks like some kind of leaf maybe? This is what they mean by permineralized as it is dimensional and who knows what it might be. This looks like seeds from a fruit. They are actually raised as if you could pick them off the surface of the plate. And here is the very weirdest thing I found (and I do like my fossils on the weird side) This has spots all over the surface. Its like that geological thing where minerals invade and fill the holes and spaces in existing rock- vesicular? I put in a little diagram to show that the spots are solid in x section and are slightly raised. They are about 1/8th inch across. Anyone hazard a guess on that? More fun stuff from the wilds of Canada! Fran
×