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Found 503 results

  1. Hi all, So, as some of you already know, my trip to Florida is coming closer and closer I am indeed really looking forward to it! Well, I have some questions about the fossils there. Firstly, for the seashells found there (bivalves and gastropods), I know that many are fossil (mainly Miocene to Pleistocene). Well, I was wondering if perhaps there were any tricks or techniques to recognize fossil ones from modern ones. For example, for the Holland coasts bivalves, the fossil ones are usually thicker, dull, white/light grey in color, and they don't let any (or very little) light shine through. Well, I was wondering if there were similar tricks for the Florida seashells to find out whether a shell is fossil or not. Please do let me know how you do it! Oh, and one other quick question: are ALL the shells NOT found on the beach fossils? I know that in the Netherlands this is not the case (you can find shells several kilometers inland that are modern; they have been brought here by floods and storms), but was wondering if this was maybe different for Florida. And lastly, a quick question about the fossiling permits. Do I need to sign up for one (I will be collecting both invertebrate and vertebrate fossils, like shark teeth and dugong bones)? If yes, is one permit enough for the family, or does everyone need to apply for one individually? And how do I get them? So, recap: What are tricks/techniques for recognizing fossil seashells from modern ones? Are all the inland seashells fossilized? Do I need fossil hunting permits? Also, if there are any special laws that you think I should be aware of let me know too. Thanks in advance for your answers! Best regards, Max PS: just realized, this is actually more suitable for the Fossil Hunts thread... @Fossildude19 or another moderator, can you please move it? Thanks
  2. Horse Tooth Size

    So I found a relatively small horse tooth. It is not hard to do. There are lots of Horse teeth in the Peace River, most of which are large but there are lots of small ones. A reason that this gets interesting is that Equus .sp is the most common horse species in the Peace River and goes back maybe 1.5 million years (there is some debate on the exact boundary line for the Pleistocene). Before Equus there were a great diversity of horse species, all smaller animals with smaller teeth. So whenever I find a small horse tooth: Is it Equus or is it an older smaller horse with smaller teeth? Here is a tooth from this week: So 26.5x11 Here are a couple of those smaller teeth from smaller horses: Here is a small Horse tooth found on the same day with Nannippus peninsulatus (above) that we agreed was still large enough to be Equus .sp All of the above teeth are lower jaw teeth (either m3 or p2 which look exactly the same) . So the question I have is: Is there a consensus on the minimal occlusal size (length and width) of Equus .sp lower jaw teeth? I have known examples of Equus (32x15) and Nannippus (19x9). Is a 26.5x11 tooth in the range of equus or not? All opinions and facts appreciated.
  3. I decided to take a break from coprolites and scan through some of Sacha's Merritt Island Matrix. One thing I see a lot are these vine-shaped traces on many of the shells in the matrix. Does anyone know the trace maker? Secondly, I came across this spiky thing. It looks modern. Is it an echinoid spine of some sort? Thanks for looking!
  4. large mammal canine

    Found this bad boy today. It still has a little enamel on the tip. I've been looking at bear, wolf and cat. Leaning toward cat, but need expert opinions please.
  5. Which formation?

    Hi all, I have a question for you guys... But I wouldn't be too surprised if you don't know the answer. Well, as a few of you know, my local hunting spot is the Zandmotor, a beach extension in the south of The Hague. You can find some of my finds here: Well, I find many bivalves and gastropods here, that are from the Eemian stage of the Pleistocene (130'000 - 115'000 years ago). Those shells (like the other fossils found on the Zandmotor) are from pits in the North Sea. Those pits are very rich in fossils, and when boats come to bring the sand onto the beach, the fossils are taken along. So the shells here are the same as those found in Maasvlakte 2 or in Hoek van Holland (two other fossil hotspots similar to the Zandmotor), just like on any Zuid-Holland beach. And I was wondering, does anyone know what formation these shells are from? I know that here in the collections, putting in "Pleistocene sediments" is good enough, but I would like to know if this is really the formation they are in. Thanks in advance for your help! Best regards, Max
  6. Horse fossil ID

    Hey all, Any reason to believe that this horse leg might belong to anything besides Equus? It's from Ice Age Florida.
  7. Carpet shell

    This is a nice fossil of the carpet shell. At first, this species, Venerupis senescens, was used as a guide fossil for the Eemian, the last interglacial age (so whenever paleontologists would find this species in a new location, they would know that they all the other fossils of the location are also Eemian). But this was later proven to be wrong.
  8. Hi all, I have been having trouble finding a good guide to use in order to ID fossil seashells (mainly gastropods and bivalves) of the Neogene-Quaternary of Western Europe (mainly Belgium/Netherlands). So, I'm turning to you guys: does anyone of you have a nice up-to-date website/online paper that I could use in order to help me ID all of my different seashells? Preferable with clear photos/drawings of the different species. Thanks in advance! Max
  9. Ice age fossils from Yukon help identify new horse genus Stilt-legged horses — extinct since the last ice age — are unrelated to modern horses, donkeys and zebras CBC News, November 28, 2017 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/yukon-horse-genus-dawson-fossils-1.4423896 The paper is: Heintzman, P.D., Zazula, G.D., MacPhee, R.D., Scott, E., Cahill, J.A., McHorse, B.K., Kapp, J.D., Stiller, M., Wooller, M.J., Orlando, L. and Southon, J.R., 2017. A new genus of horse from Pleistocene North America. bioRxiv, p.154963. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/06/24/154963 https://elifesciences.org/articles/29944 Yours, Paul H.
  10. Hunting in the rain

    It rained hard most of the morning, It is not a lot of fun with water pouring down your neck, Thankful for baseball caps. Fortunately there are rewards... 4 of the Megs were unbroken and small. Largest was 1.75 inches. Some big chunks.. Land tortoise or sea turtle? This is the biggest complete piece that I have found. Finally, a likely rib bone.. just wondering if the groove makes this one identifiable.. Thanks for suggestions Jack
  11. calcaneum id

    I'm still having trouble distinguishing bison and cow calcanea even with some of the great line drawings that various members have provided. Here are two that look very similar to me except for the size. Are they both cow, bison or are there differences I'm overlooking? couple more shots
  12. Klondike placer miner honoured for paleontological finds 'I always find it very special to find a really nice steppe bison skull in good shape,' says Stuart Schmidt CBC News, November 25, 2017 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/schmidt-placer-miner-award-paleontology-1.4418978 Klondike placer miner makes rare discovery of extinct muskox skull Stuart Schmidt discovered the helmeted muskox skull and horns during routine work on Monday, CBC News, September 14, 2017 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/klondike-muskox-schmidt-placer-skull-1.4290440 Other related material Helmeted Muskox, Beringia Research Notes http://www.tc.gov.yk.ca/publications/Muskox_2002.pdf http://www.tc.gov.yk.ca/beringian_research_notes.html Pleistocene Vertebrates of Yukon Territory by C.R. Harington http://av-sher.narod.ru/Biblio/22_harington_vertebrates_yukon.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  13. Sus scrofa jaw from Pleistocene Russia.

    From the album Ice Age Europe

    Top down view.
  14. Sus scrofa jaw from Pleistocene Russia.

    From the album Ice Age Europe

    A great juvenile wild boar jaw from the Pleistocene of Russia. You can see the front tusk/incisor still erupting. I've wanted one of these for a while now but they are quite rare. I love it! The tusk is actually loose and comes put. I think that's great! I can see the whole root.
  15. Fossil Bison Bone a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Bison Bone SITE LOCATION: North Sea area ("Doggerland") TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene ( 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) The European bison (Bison bonasus), also known as wisent or the European wood bison, is a Eurasian species of bison. It is one of two extant species of bison, alongside the American bison. Three subspecies existed in the recent past, but only one survives today. The species is, theoretically, descended from a hybrid, a cross between a female aurochs, the extinct wild ancestor of modern cattle, and a male Steppe bison; the possible hybrid is referred to informally as the Higgs bison. Alternatively, the Pleistocene woodland bison has been suggested as the ancestor to the species. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Bovidae Genus: Bison
  16. Fossil Bison Bone a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Bison Bone SITE LOCATION: North Sea area ("Doggerland") TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene ( 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) The European bison (Bison bonasus), also known as wisent or the European wood bison, is a Eurasian species of bison. It is one of two extant species of bison, alongside the American bison. Three subspecies existed in the recent past, but only one survives today. The species is, theoretically, descended from a hybrid, a cross between a female aurochs, the extinct wild ancestor of modern cattle, and a male Steppe bison; the possible hybrid is referred to informally as the Higgs bison. Alternatively, the Pleistocene woodland bison has been suggested as the ancestor to the species. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Bovidae Genus: Bison
  17. Fossil Bison Bone a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Bison Bone SITE LOCATION: North Sea area ("Doggerland") TIME PERIOD: Pleistocene ( 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) The European bison (Bison bonasus), also known as wisent or the European wood bison, is a Eurasian species of bison. It is one of two extant species of bison, alongside the American bison. Three subspecies existed in the recent past, but only one survives today. The species is, theoretically, descended from a hybrid, a cross between a female aurochs, the extinct wild ancestor of modern cattle, and a male Steppe bison; the possible hybrid is referred to informally as the Higgs bison. Alternatively, the Pleistocene woodland bison has been suggested as the ancestor to the species. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Bovidae Genus: Bison
  18. kinda big bone

    I almost tripped over this log today while out on the Brazos River. So my question is...Is there a way to differentiate mammoth femur from mastodon femur. I can post more pics after I clean it up a bit. Right now all I know is that it weighs 52lbs, 17 inches wide and 30 inches long. It was fun carrying up the bank and back to my car. And wondering if I would dive in after it if I swamped the kayak on the trip back.....
  19. It kinda looks like an ear bone?

    Found this today, something struck me as odd so I stuck it in my pocket. It’s from the peace river. I’m looking at it, and it kinda looks like an ear bone from a dolphin or manatee, but I don’t know...it’s something, just can’t wrap my head around it. Any ideas?
  20. Calliostoma wilcoxiana

    A very nice little gastropod. The marl pit this came out of produces very well preserved gastropods and bivalves. An uncommon find, but not rare.
  21. Odd shaped bone?

    Anyone have any idea what bone this is? Never found one like it before. Pleistocene of Australia.
  22. Today’s finds from the Peace.

    Bought a brand new yak, got to test it out today. Beautiful weather all day. Went to the peace river with my wife. Here’s the finds, not all fossils but cool nonetheless. Looks like some boar, bovine, mammoth, turtle, ect ect. I found a nice meg right out the gate, but my wife lost it! Such is life. The river levels are getting perfect in some areas for snorkeling. Will be going back all week(I’m off). Cheers guys, and happy hunting.
  23. A good first day Peace River

    This is late for me but I have been distracted with other issues. Basically on my 1st real hunting day, I had low expectations. A lot of prospecting, deeper water, etc. But this was a good day. Lots of small quality shark teeth, 3 decent lower hemis and a ALMOST unbroken Meg. I may go back to this spot. I thought these are modern wild pig and broken capybara incisor. But my find of the day was almost fantastic As it flipped into the sieve , I thought whale or tusk, but it turns out to be bone. About the best complete dugong rib I have ever found and it had to be a very small animal. So analysis requested. Is it complete? Another photo of the "end" Thanks to all. Jack
  24. Glycymeris americana

    This little clam, though rather common; is nice to find in great condition. This particular specimen is one of the nicer ones I have found in this location.
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