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Found 899 results

  1. Last saturday I went on my 2nd fossilhunt to the "Wienerberger quarry" in Rumst (Belgium) with my girlfriend and the BVP, my fossil club. This quarry is only accessible for fossil collections during official excursions organised by fossils clubs. The quarry existed out of multiple layers, the oldest was a oligocene clay layer dating back to the Rupelian (named for the region) around 33.90 - 20.10 mya, although I didn't hunt in that layer, some of the finds that could be done there were bivalves, gastropods and brachiopods. The layer where most people hunted was a very thin miocene layer dating back probably to the Burdigalian around 20.43 - 15.97 mya. The most common finds here were multiple species of shark teeth and some marine mammal fossils. And then there was another layer were it was possible to find Pleistocene fossils dating back to the last ice age, but the chances of finding anything there was quite slim. So me & my girlfriend and most of the other fellow fossil hunters mostly hunted in the miocene layer in search for fossil shark teeth. The overlook to the entrance of the quarry, looking at the oligocene clay layers. Everyone digging for and sieving through that thin layer full of miocene shark teeth Me looking for some teeth My girlfriend looking for some teeth And while we were digging for the layer like everyone else, the finds were a bit meager at first, not just for us but for everyone. But then my girlfriend found a tooth a bit lower on the hill and we started scraping away the top layer of sand. Turns out that some previous land slides washed the best material down hill, lower than were the rest was hunting and so the spoils started coming. We found most material there including our best find, a 6,5 cm long C. hastalis tooth found by my girlfriend and a partial marine mammal vert found by me! I believe our hastalis tooth was the 2nd largest tooth found that day, only a megalodon found during the trip was bigger. As the day was drawing to an end and our spot was becoming depleted of fossils we took a walk around the quarry to look for a new spot only to return to our old spot to start digging towards the miocene layer again. But this time a little bit more to the right. We found a few nice shark teeth while doing this and a lot of iron concretions but but much else. Only during the last few minutes of the trip I did hit something that wasn't a concretion. After some digging it turned out to be a piece of wooly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) which ended up a little bit above the miocene layers during a previous land slide.
  2. Sloth Astragalus, Eremotherium?

    I, my son and grandson went canoeing yesterday on a river in SE Texas. My son spotted this from about 50 yards away on a gravel bar. I'm pretty sure it is Eremotherium but wanted confirmation as it would be a scarce find here. It weighs about 11 lbs and is about 8 1/2 inches wide maybe 9 inches tall. Any input? @garyc @ harry_pristis @ shellseeker @uncle siphuncle @PrehistoricFlorida
  3. Multiple Hunts this week

    I get out hunting as often as I am able. In addition to the fossil finds, I am at a point in life where exercise has great value and fossil hunting the Peace River watershed 3 times a week does get the muscles moving and the blood flowing. Add the great feeling with getting out into nature which I share with numerous animals of all types and this is just about a perfect hobby, BUT, not always a successful one. I think that I, over the long run, find one impressive fossil a week... What about this week? A lot of folks are saying that the Peace River water depth is dropping and this is open for success in fossil hunting. Last Sunday, I went to one of my favorite locations that have been very successful for me in the past, as recently as last spring. I usually kayak to to/from this location for an hour each way and hunt shovel and sieve for 5-6 hours --- good exercise. The Peace River is still high. Right this minute , the USGS gauge at Zolfo Springs is over 7 feet. That is un_diggable, except in isolated spots. You need to cling close to the banks and the currents are fast. !!!! I found a couple of chipped Equus teeth, turtle shell and spurs, 120 small teeth 70 % broken. Largest of the small shark teeth were 3 30-40 mm hemipristis (2 lowers and an upper). I did enjoy the day, sunny, cold out in nature. So , Monday was my 2nd day out to the Peace River this week.. Somewhat better, with 2 frequent fossils hunting friends, staying close digging in a 2 foot layer that had been uncovered by the heavy summer currents. They found it and invited me to partake. Not a show stopper , but some good fossils. I tend to remove (and donate) broken and small shark teeth from my "finds" photo. So the finds from a home to home 12 hour hunt. Some osteoderms, barracuda teeth, a few larger Lemon and Hemipristis teeth, a broken tapir, broken llame incisor, Thresher tooth (relatively rare). and then some closeup photos below. I liked this last hemi best and another sun_shiny day in paradise
  4. Pleistocene bone Id

    I found this bone years ago on the Brazos River and never got around to asking for help with an I’d. Could this be from a bird? It seems hollow, but well mineralized.
  5. Scientists hope ancient Tomales Bay mammoth molar holds clues to prehistoric environment The Press Democrat, October 11, 2019 https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/10135759-181/paleontologists-hopes-ancient-mammoth-molar Mammoth molar found on bay beach holds clues Point Reyes Light, October 16, 2019 https://www.ptreyeslight.com/article/mammoth-molar-found-bay-beach-holds-clues ACR family member makes mammoth find on Tomales Bay. ACR Conservation in Action https://www.egret.org/acr-family-member-makes-mammoth-find-tomales-bay Tomales Bay https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomales_Bay Ice Age clues near Bodega. Scientist thinks mammoths rubbed coast rocks 12,000 years ago By Peter Fimrite, SF Gate, December 3, 2006 https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Ice-Age-clues-near-Bodega-Scientist-thinks-2466058.php Mammoth Rocks, California https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23566 https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23822 Yours, Paul H.
  6. Small Canine

    One of the guys hunting with me today found this canine and asked me to identify. I was surprised how laterally thin the tooth is. I am pretty sure we will identify. Please state the characteristic that makes your ID correct. i.e what differentiates from similar sized mammal canines? The standard experts: @Harry Pristis @PrehistoricFlorida. EDITED, sorry. The top edge close to the tip (Photo #3) is worn presumably by grinding against the opposing canine. All comments & suggestions appreciated. Jack
  7. Woolly Mammoth Fossils Uncovered on North Carolina Beach By WWAY News - October 30, 2019 https://www.wwaytv3.com/2019/10/30/woolly-mammoth-washes-up-on-nc-beach/ Yours, Paul H.
  8. Pleistocene vertebra

    Is there enough of this vertebra for an id? Found in Brazos River Pleistocene gravel in SE Texas.
  9. Chunk o’ sumpin big!

    I’ve had this chunk of bone for a while and not been able to get an ID on it. It is from the Brazos River in SE. Texas, Pleistocene material. Any ideas? @Harry Pristis, @fossilus, @Shellseeker @jcbshark @Uncle Siphuncle @JohnJ
  10. Provenance needed

    A collector/dealer recently donated to our museum a small collection of Pleistocene vertebrate fossils (mostly mammalian) from Florida. Only a few items were labelled, and he could not recall any provenance for some of the material. Even though the material was poorly provenanced, it will make a welcome addition to our comparative collection of Pleistocene vertebrates. Can anyone help me with the provenance for the llama/camel (cf. Hemiauchenia) calcaneum in this phone-camera snapshot? I thought the attached oyster shells might help in narrowing down the possibilities. I was given a verbal location for this specimen (there was no label), but I am skeptical. Thank you!
  11. Great Morava bones ID

    Hi. Found these bones yesterday at gravel pits facility where workers separate big rocks from the fine sand from Great Morava river. They don't burn at all or smell like a burnt bone. Here are some photos if someone can help me identify them : I know for one that is radius bone from Bison/Bos, but don't know about the others. P.s. Also u can see that one bone has something similar like "scars" from a possible flint? Please help! Darko
  12. Hey everyone! On Wednesday, as I finally had some time, I decided to take Sara out to my favorite hunting spot: the Zandmotor (Netherlands). I definitely did not regret that decision! If you've never heard of the Zandmotor before, it's an artificial beach extension just south of The Hague, and the sand that was used was dredged from the North Sea and is full of Ice Age megafaunal mammal bones and tons of Eemian shells. If you want to see some more of my finds and hunts there, just look up "Zandmotor" in the TFF search bar and you should find a bunch of stuff When we got there it was raining, which annoyed me a little bit because the forecast said it wouldn't... The rain also makes the sand stick to the fossils which can become annoying when looking for small fossils or trying to recognize the thing you just picked up. But, having just spent an hour in the bus to get here, I didn't want to turn back immediately. Luckily the rain stopped within half an hour, and I wasn't even on the Zandmotor yet (I have to walk about an hour from the bus stop to the Zandmotor itself) and after that the weather alternated between cloudy and sunny which was nice. While I usually always take a pass by the shell banks, today I decided to only walk along the shoreline to increase the chances of finding good mammal stuff. In fact, there had been a strong eastern wind on Tuesday which helped uncover a lot of the bones and make them wash ashore. This did not go unnoticed, there were a lot indeed! Here is my first big find of the day, a great complete horse astralagus!
  13. I found this bone in Florida's Peace River in a gravel bed that contained Pleistocene and Holocene land vertebrates. I am unsure about this bone. Is it a small deer, or is it a turkey bone? Or, am I entirely wrong and it's an alligator? Thanks in advance! MikeG
  14. Hi gang, been awhile...I was puzzling over these two items below again. Found several years ago here in Florida. One a possible osteoderm? and the other an ungual? Mio/Pliocene? or Pleistocene? in age. First specimen I thought was some type of tortoise armor, has a concentric wafer shape and is about 3 cm across and about 1cm thick. Under closer inspection there appears to be an odd fracturing going along the outside and also some minor cracking which appears to be forming a hexagonal outline/pattern....Just a coincidence? Do any glyptothere osteoderms show an internal hexagonal pattern? Left photo is ventral? and the far right photo is the opposite side--dorsal view? Middle photo highlites the fracturing/cracking patterns.... 2nd specimen I thought was a tortoise ungual but in looking at several older threads I'm now wondering if it looks more like it might belong to a glyptothere? Its only about 2cm long. Thanks for any/all help. Regards, Chris
  15. New evidence that an extraterrestrial collision 12,800 years ago triggered an abrupt climate change for Earth, the Conversation, October 22, 2019 https://theconversation.com/new-evidence-that-an-extraterrestrial-collision-12-800-years-ago-triggered-an-abrupt-climate-change-for-earth-118244 the paper is: Moore, C.R., M.J. Brooks, A.C. Goodyear, T.A. Ferguson, A.G. Perrotti, S. Mitra, A. Listecki, B. King, D.J. Mallinson, C.S. Lane, B. Shapiro, J. Knapp, A. West, D.L. Carlson, W. Wolbach, T.R. Them, S.M. Harris, and S. Pyne-O’Donnell. 2019. Sediment Cores from White Pond, South Carolina, contain a platinum anomaly, pyrogenic carbon peak, and coprophilous spore decline at 12.8 ka. Scientific Reports volume 9, Article number: 15121 (2019) https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-51552-8 Regardless of how the platinum anomaly is interpreted, White Pond, a Carolina Bay predates it and the Younger Dryas. Thus, the above paper further supports the idea that the Carolina Bays are not connected to Younger Dryas event as concluded by: Schaetzl, R.J., Sauck, W., Heinrich, P.V., Colgan, P.M. and Holliday, V.T., 2019. Commentary on Klokočník, J., Kostelecký, and Bezděk, A. 2019. The putative Saginaw impact structure, Michigan, Lake Huron, in the light of gravity aspects derived from recent EIGEN 6C4 gravity field model. Journal of Great Lakes Research 45: 12–20. A related paper is: Krause, T.R., Russell, J.M., Zhang, R., Williams, J.W. and Jackson, S.T., 2019. Late Quaternary vegetation, climate, and fire history of the Southeast Atlantic Coastal Plain based on a 30,000-yr multi-proxy record from White Pond, South Carolina, USA. Quaternary Research, 91(2), pp.861-880. Vancouver Yours Paul H.
  16. Xenarthran mandible?

    I found this today on the Brazos River in SE Texas. At first I thought it was a chunk of a vertebra. After washing some mud off I was surprised to see teeth with roots extending to the broken ends of a mandible. Based on the shape of the teeth I think it is a xenarthran, but which one???
  17. Vertebrae ID

    Hi people! I have something to show you, it's from last years fossil hunt. I went last year to a beautiful Cave in Zabrega, (Paraćin) to try to find some pleistocene fossils. The Cave itself is not so deep but it's very wide and very big. I did found some bones and teeth which are half recent and half fossilized i guess? I found also pottery so it could be archeological but idk honestly. I'm here to show you my "biggest" find - it's a vert. not sure if that belongs to a deer or something else. You decide Thanks for help. Darko
  18. Neanderthal skull

    Hi! Again with some new stuff, this time with Neanderthal skull. I haven't done anything like it before so i hope this one will get good votes, if not that's also okay. Enjoy! Darko
  19. Holmesina Osteoderm

    I've posted this fossil a few times on the forum to mixed results, lacking a definitive answer. Through some more in depth internet searching I now believe this fossil which I found back in February of 2018 on the Peace River in Florida is a worn osteoderm belonging to Holmesina or a close relative. I want to see if others agree with this idea. It's about 2.5 cm across.
  20. Tortoise bone?

    I’m getting a tortoise vibe from this bone. Can anyone confirm? If so which phone is this? Thanks!I’m getting a tortoise vibe from this bone. Can anyone confirm? If so which phone is this? Thanks!
  21. Sawfish Vert ?

    Out hunting today. Interesting location. Mostly marine, but did pick up some Equus teeth at the end. I have a couple of Sawfish verts. Is this another ?
  22. Almost complete ancient bison bones I've found this weekend. First bone from the left is the dorsal vertebra that are bison priscus and so on. Most of the time I only find single bones of these animal, but this is the first time I've seen this many bones from single animal.
  23. Pleistocene fossils

    Hello, I bought these two Pleistocene fossils today at the fossil fair - but the seller was not sure what kind of animal they come from. The first one is 10 cm long: Picture with a flash: The second one is 15 cm long: Pictures with a flash: Can anyone help me ID these? They come from Vistula River sands, Pleistocene age. Thanks a lot
  24. Sabre-tooth cat from Alberta

    https://canoe.com/technology/fossil-evidence-of-sabre-toothed-cat-found-in-southern-alberta https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/sabre-toothed-cat-alberta_ca_5d972269e4b02911e119321e?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cDovL2MubmV3c25vdy5jby51ay9BLzEwMDMyMjkwMjU_LTE3MDEyOjMxNzc6bW9zdF9yZWFkX3RvcA&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAADScMybLtp_opPvCh-5kIENPNkC8bCyESRfw7_Kxl_5dQyhoPXtROZ7HibqeIWfCZQvV9pDG1j-0gOHDwbFgmIfncGnOsDjYgiWmEdGyavAcqV0Uog0phIBSzs2NKHta-RGOfB6jbZMViXVvzlkn3L3PreVMXxFS4pFDH6vwkO8O
  25. Sm bone

    It feels good to get back to river hunting, slightly early this year. My hunting friend found this bone and asked if I could get an ID. There seems to be some features that possibly identify the "type" of bone (humerus, scapel, etc) versus which animal. It is 3.2 length x 1.1 height (inches). Found in the Pleistocene - miocene mix that is the Peace River. However, most of the associated fossils were shark, fish or marine mammal (porpoise earbone & verts), so marine is a possibility. ALL comments & suggestions are greatly appreciated. Jack
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