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Found 1,066 results

  1. Ice Age fossils

    The other day I decided to switch from the usual Paleozoic and look for Pleistocene fossils in the city of Chicago. Because of the pandemic, the streets were barren, so driving around was very easy. Here is Michigan Ave & Wacker Drive, a normally bustling, congested intersection.. empty and quiet. I wasn't expecting to find anything and have a nice drive. There were a couple areas I was interested in exploring, the first looked promising but revealed only glacial till/sand/clay. The second area I was surprised upon close inspection to find tiny fossil mollusks in the unearthed lacustrine glacial deposit. No saber toothed cats or mastodon teeth, of course, but still a nice surprise. I collected as many as could find in the small exposure. This would be Wisconsin Episode, Equality Formation, Dolton Member. I'm not sure what phase of glaciation Lake Michigan was at around this time, but from what I can glean from reports, this would be between 8,000- 26,000 BP, I believe. Amnicola sp. Pisidium sp. ? ? Group shot. The only literature I can find regarding Pleistocene mollusks deals with NW and central Illinois. Also had some fun with the sand under cross polarized light. The sand grains look more angular and jagged than local beach samples. After collecting the mollusks, I made my way up to Juneway beach on the far north side . It is a beach that has recently been completely engulfed by Lake Michigan and the city had to dump Silurian dolomite to thwart erosion. It is a modern "lost beach." Thanks for reading!
  2. Tusk Stabilization

    This is a tusk I recovered from a river sand bar in Iowa 24 hours ago. The tusk was in somewhat damp sand. It started to degrade right away once it was unearthed. I wrapped the tusk in a towel but it did dry out a bit. I got it home about 5 hours later and re-wrapped it in damp towels. I am writing this post to spell out my plan based only on reading some other posts but not based on any experience. I would appreciate any advise. What am I missing or doing wrong? -Add many zip ties to hold tusk together. Leave crusted-on sand for now. -Wrap with damp towels and wrap that with plastic trash bags, NOT completely airtight. -Store in dry basement for several months to gradually dry out. -After drying period, carefully clean and "baste" with paraloid b-72 50:1 -Use more concentrated paraloid b-72 to glue loose parts. Lots of small crumbled pieces to deal with somehow. -Cure for several days and then fill voids with PaleoSculp (or equal) a little bit at a time. -Sand and buff -Make a stand and show off! Thank you for looking!
  3. Unknown Humerus

    I found this distal end of a mammalian humerus several weeks ago on the Brazos River southwest of Houston. After hours of searching, it doesn't seem to exactly match any of the common suspects: deer, camel, horse, or bison. Deer or camel is more likely than horse or bison, as the bone is relatively slender and the end of it isn't as bulky as either of those animals. It is possible that I have incorrectly ruled out deer and camels as the trochlea and capitulum on the end are very worn down. If anyone has any suggestions, I'm more than willing to hear them. Thanks!
  4. Perissodactyl Astragalus

    Both of these astragali were found on the Brazos River southwest of Houston. The larger of the two clearly belongs to Equus, but the smaller one continues to stump me. I know by the shape that it definitely some sort of perissodactyl, and although it resembles the shape of the Equus astragalus it is much, much smaller. The taller of the two ridges (I'm not sure what their name actually is) on the proximal end of the bone has been worn down by water or time so that it seems almost level with the other. If it were still present, these two astragalus would probably be identical. It occurred to me last week while looking at it again that it might be from a three-toed horse since they were a lot smaller than the more modern species of horses that prevailed in the late Pleistocene. Is there any way to tell? Or is it just from a younger Equus individual? Thanks for the help!
  5. Long time since I have been here. Glad to be back and hunting again. I am stumped on a recent find and would be grateful for assistance. I believe it is a sacrum but cannot ID the animal. It’s size is is much larger than bovine. It is structurally developed for a larger animal. I was considering early horse but the number of fused vertebrae is off. Was found south of Houston on the Brazos River.
  6. Florida fossil ID

    This fossil was found in Florida on private property and I am unable to get a good ID on the specimen due to the bone not having the ends still in tact. All i know is that it’s Pleistocene in age and is from Florida
  7. Weird Neogene/Pleistocene Tooth

    I found this the other day in a bag of Aurora micro matrix. It's only about 3 mm long. Could be Miocene, Pliocene or Pleistocene as all three run through the mine and the matrix is thoroughly sifted together during mining operations. There appears to be a root and possibly two tips broken off?
  8. ID Florida Vertebrate Fossil

    Hello, East Venice, FL vertebrate mystery fossil. Unique indentation in V shape. Found in Pleistocene material. Cracked by tractor. Recent material identified in same location as: Sloth, Equus, Meg teeth. I realize it is not the best specimen but the V shape on one side is unique. Thanks in advance for your suggestions/identification. I didn't see an example in the gallery or textbook. Height is 5cm
  9. Fossil? Jaws.

    Hi, I was wondering if these jaws were fossilized, they’re for bid as Pleistocene but they looked kind of modern.
  10. ID Fossil Turtle Shell ?

    Found this cool fossil today. Measures 6 1/2" x 5 1/2" x 2 inches high. Venice, FL construction site. Located 5 feet away from a nice Meg tooth. Pleistocene material recovered within 50 yards. My first thought was small tortoise shell fully intact. Located close by was another larger size tortoise shell that was not fully fossilized. Hoping someone can confirm this is a fossilized turtle shell. Regards, Michael
  11. Mammal Calcaneum

    Found on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. I know this is the distal end of a calcaneum, but I can't figure out whether it's horse, bison, or even bear - it seems to both match and not match pictures I'm finding online. Any help is appreciated.
  12. Partial Jaw Bovid, Cervid?

    Found on a river gravel bar in southern MN.
  13. I've been finding Pleistocene fossils along the gravel bars in the southernmost section of the Brazos River lately, but they've almost always been unidentifiable chunks or fragments of bone. Obviously I'd like to find something well-preserved enough for me to be able to do the research and find out what it actually is, but I don't know where to look. The Beaumont and Lissie Formations that run underneath Houston and the surrounding areas are both Pleistocene-age, but the actual river basin itself is just made up of alluvial deposits. Of course, this must mean that the fossils are being washed down with the current from some location further north, right? The Waco Mammoth site is several hours from my location, but I know that the fossils there were found only a mile or two north of the river itself. Originally I thought that this is where the fossils I'm finding must be coming from too, but I know that Holmesina, Bison, and Camelops skeletons used to be found in the bayous within downtown Houston before the city grew to the size its at today. As far as I know, there aren't any exposures of sediments like this that are also the age I'm looking for anywhere close to where I live. I'd really appreciate it if anyone with experience hunting southern or central Texas could point me in the right direction. I'm not asking for any specific sites since I know people won't want to give those up, just general areas where Pleistocene outcrops or exposures would be present. Thanks for the help!
  14. ID Multi-color fossil

    Unique two-color fossil throughout. Found in Venice, FL. The fossil is 6cm x 6cm x 2.5cm. Other fossil material in the area ranges from Meg teeth, whale vertebrae, Equus. My thoughts were of an osteoderm. Their is a raised portion at the break on the dorsal side. ID appreciated.
  15. Hesperotestudo epiplastron?

    Collected this about a week ago on a gravel bar in a local river near Houston that is mostly late Pleistocene material. I've labeled it Hespertestudo crassiscutata based on the size. Can someone confirm this is the left epiplastron? Thanks, Darrow
  16. Osteoderm?

    Found on the Brazos River southwest of Houston, Texas. I originally thought that this was an alligator osteoderm, but it lacks the distinctive boss in the middle of the bone. Looking around on the forum, it seems to match tortoise osteoderms rather well. Can someone confirm? I've found carapace fragments from both hard and softshell turtles before, but never one of these. I didn't even realize tortoises had osteoderms until now. What part of the body do they come from? As you can tell from the pictures, the bone is a decent size, so would this have to be a giant land tortoise or something else. Honestly, I'm pretty out of my depth with this one. Also, if someone could recommend any sort of books I can use to help identify the Pleistocene fossils I find in Texas, that would be appreciated as well - it's starting to seem like the Florida guidebooks on the subject are going to be the closest I can get!
  17. I know bone fragment ID's are usually left at just that "bone fragments," but I've seen some pretty amazing ID's here lately and this is my favorite little puzzle. It was found on Edisto beach which harbors Pleistocene mammals mixed with Miocene and Holocene aquatic creatures. More info on the location (including a list of mammals) can be found here: https://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2010/05/25/the-edisto-beach-fossil-site/ It's completely hollow and has what appears to be healed over bite marks. Even if it can't be ID'd, if anyone can confirm or deny if the markings are really bite marks I'd be over the moon. Furthermore, the bottom is concave. I have a photo of the bottom too if you need it, but I ran out of room for this post
  18. I have an unknown, dense, arced fossil that is solid. Image 1 shows the smooth, angled surface. I cannot find a reference for this item. Found in spoil pile today in inland Venice. Surrounding material from Pleistocene. Thank you in advance. This should be challenging... Regards, Michael
  19. Mammoth/Mastodon Toe Bone?

    Found on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. When I first picked this up, judging by the extreme river damage it had suffered being tossed around in the water for so many years, I simply assumed it was just another unidentifiable piece of Pleistocene bone to get thrown in the box with the others back at home. But since I've been going through the galleries of some of the members here to help identify the other bones I collected, this one seems to bear a resemblance to a mammoth metacarpal. Maybe the smallest one, although the damage on several spots is significant - the outer bony surface on one side has been completely removed. Am I just crazy, or is this thing the real deal? Any help on an ID is appreciated!
  20. Turtle/Tortoise Carapace Fragment

    Found on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. The title says it all, as that's about all I know about this one! Any help on narrowing it down beyond that to something like a basic genus or even a species would be welcome.
  21. Mystery Jawbone

    Found on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. When I first saw it I almost left it behind as it looked modern at a glance. The jawbone is definitely mineralized, however, but unfortunately its missing the teeth it used to contain as it's only one side of the whole bone. My best guess is that its a fragment of an alligator jaw based on the round tooth cavities and the way they're spaced apart, but if anyone more knowledgable then me could give a suggestion, that would be great.
  22. Peccary Molar?

    Found on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. Unfortunately all that's left of this tooth are the roots. Judging by their coloration and the general size they seem to match up fairly well with pictures of peccary molars I've been able to find online. Obviously if there was an occlusal surface this would be a lot easier, but if anybody has any suggestions I would greatly appreciate them. Thanks!
  23. Turtle Nuchal Bone

    Found on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. I'm fairly confident that this is a nuchal bone, but I my real interest lies in identifying what species of turtle it is from. I seem to remember reading a post on here mentioning that nucal bones are diagnostic to taxon, so that should make it easy. Unfortunately, I can't find anything anywhere about different Texas Pleistocene turtle species. Hopefully someone here is more knowledgable than me! I would appreciate any suggestions.
  24. Unknown Florida Mammal Tooth

    Hello, I have positively identified three other teeth today by looking through the FF gallery and UF Florida Museum collections. This tooth is different from the Equus examples. I could not match it up with camel either. Some of you have incredible collections. Fossil collected from retention pond spoils in North Port, FL. Hole depth 5-10 feet below sea level. Area near Little Salt Spring. Thank you in advance for your knowledge. Regards, Michael
  25. Pleistocene Tooth

    Found on the Brazos River just west of Richmond, Texas. My best guess is Equus sp. judging by how flat it is, but any confirmations or other suggestions are welcome. Unfortunately the occlusal surface is extremely worn down, so identification may be difficult. If anyone knows exactly what tooth it is (such as location in the mouth) that would be very helpful too. Thanks for looking!
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