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Found 612 results

  1. Hunting between thunderstorms and deeper water. During the rest of the season, I note those places where I am finding fossils but have low water conditions...because of lower back issues, I generally refuse to hunt where I must bend over the screen. However, I do remember where such spots exist for days like today. An excellent day, some unusual, finds, a couple of megs, and then these: A odd bone, I have not previously found, but believe to be an Equus Splint bone: Another interesting fossil which I think most likely a large Sloth dermal scute. Finally, my best find of the day, a piece of jaw with a Hemiauchenia m3 molar in nice cream - brown colors.. These are really nice finds... but I was cherishing the end days of the 2017-2018 season with a friend on a day with sunshine in the morning and rain clouds later in the day. Does not get better than this... Jack
  2. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  3. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  4. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  5. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  6. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  7. Partial Tooth ID

    Found this partial tooth while hunting in N. Central Texas. Clearly mammal but not sure if there is enough to get an ID.
  8. Hi all! I've been away from the site for a bit - I taught my first historical geology lecture this spring, and ended up spending three nights a week working on a lecture til the wee hours of the morning, and so the last month has left me without enough time to follow up on the forum. I'll try to get caught up over the next few days. I have a bazillion missed messages from people, so I'll get through them ASAP! This weekend I wrote a new (and very long) blog post about the geology, paleontology, and history of the Ashley Phosphate Beds in the Charleston area - a must read for anyone confused about our stratigraphy! http://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2018/05/the-ashley-phosphate-beds.html
  9. A couple of weeks ago Dennis and I went back to Edisto Beach, S.C. to celebrate our 31st. wedding anniversary. The drive to the Island was an unpleasant mix of wind and heavy rain, but all that weather served to redistribute fresh fossil material on the beach! Once again, we had lovely weather and low tides at a convenient time of day for the rest of the week. The majority of the fossils found on Edisto Beach are Late Pleistocene, ca. 50,000-10,000 old. They are from an undetermined offshore unit, Charleston County, S.C. This very large vertebra was sitting right on top of the shell pile the morning after the big blow. I tried to remember to take in situ photos. It's so hard to not just snatch the finds up! And I remembered to use my special turquoise Magic Photo Cube @aerogrower We are not sure of the ID of the vertebra beyond it being a cervical one. Any ideas? And a view of each angle; My hunting buddy Dennis has developed quite an eye for fossils, and contributed to our antler collection in this photo. I have never found so much antler at one time! continued in next reply
  10. Whose jaw is this?

    hi All, Saw this for sale from China. No additional info. Based upon other items that the buy has for sale, I'd say Miocene or Pleistocene. It's clearly mammal. Looks camel-y to me, but I'm no mammal expert. Any thoughts? thanks!
  11. Dear Fellow Fossil Fanatics, I just had a great day at Big Brook, found some shark teeth but also 3 specimens that I am not sure at all what to make of. Any insights would be awesome! Best, Huttner
  12. Texas Mammoth Stuff

    I don’t buy fossils often as I prefer to find them myself. But I do respond to a good deal at times, especially when the specimens are better quality on average than my personal finds. Several years ago I met a husband and wife in a small Texas town with a mammoth jaw for sale online. The add was pulled due to thick heads at the sale site misinterpreting the ivory ban to extend to fossil ivory...fortunately this went down after we got each others’ Paypal info. Side note: I was first bidder and the new policy saved me from entering a bidding war! Anyway, I got a great deal, and they liked the no-haggling experience we shared. Every 2 or 3 years I get a call from them, as was the case this week. I guess they put the word out over time in their little town, and now everyone in town brings their unwanted Pleisto stuff to this couple for commission sale. We have a great rapport and they give me first right of refusal on everything. The stuff I don’t have room for I often give away as gifts or it makes its way into other hands pretty quick through trade or occasionally by sale. It’s all good...now my coworkers, friends and family are all loaded down by complete and partial mammoth teeth. And I may have kept a goodies few for myself. The funny part was watching me part with $ on this stuff several years ago. Now that I’ve found a few good mammoth teeth and tusk sections on my own, buying isn’t the same jagged pill it used to be. Glad my pride didn’t blind me to good deals. Anyway, let’s have a look at my most recent takeaways. The biggest tooth is 13” maximum dimension.
  13. An Ancient Horse Is Unearthed in a Utah Backyard Paleontologists recently determined that a skeleton discovered during a landscaping project belonged to a horse from the Pleistocene Era. New Year Times https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/03/science/horse-skeleton-utah.html Utah Family Found Ancient Horse Skeleton In Their Backyard By Rex Austin, Great Lakes Ledger, May 3, 2018 https://greatlakesledger.com/2018/05/03/utah-family-found-ancient-horse-skeleton-in-their-backyard/ Fossil Friday Roundup: May 4, 2018 by Sarah Gibson, Fossil Friday Roundup, May 4, 2018 http://blogs.plos.org/paleocomm/2018/05/04/fossil-friday-roundup-may-4-2018/ Yours, Paul H.
  14. mammal vertebra

    This vertebra is different the typical ones I find. I found it in pleistocene gravels of the Brazos River in SE Texas. Any ideas? The neural canal is so small....
  15. Possible Glyptodon Scute?

    Hi! I came across this the other day at the beach in North Carolina. I've been researching and think possibly a Glyptodon Scute? Thank you!!!!
  16. Backgarden bounty

    I am very fortunate that our house is built upon Jurassic rocks so I can go fossil hunting in my own back garden! I'm doubly lucky that there is also a small brook at the end of our garden, the stream bed gravels of which are amazingly fossil rich. Over the years we have found many, many gryphaea - they're extraordinarily common - plus good numbers of Belemnites, pentacrinites crinoid stems, bivalves, ammonites and kuldrinchnium (infilled anemone burrows). Our 'beach'. The bridge interrupts the stream flow causing deposition of new gravels during winter floods. Today was the first nice sunny day for over a week. After returning from work I mowed the lawns front and back then had half an hour spare before the boys returned from school. Until recently the water level in the brook has been very high (we've had a very wet winter and early spring) so this was the first chance I have had to see if anything new has been unearthed from the gravels.
  17. Unknown mammal bones ID help

    Hi I have had in my collection for sometime now some unidentified mammal bones . They was part of an old museum collection I think going by the markings on the cave hyena specimens. All the fossil found in Tor Newton (Tornewton) cave in South Devon UK. In the collection was cave hyena teeth and foot bones, a tip of a Straight Tusted elephant and there unknown mammal bones. Collecting from these sites is strictly prohibited today. So was probably collected from these sites during the 18th/19th century up until as late as the 1950s. There are three pictures of each bone if you can please help with an ID that would been fantastic. I will also include some pictures of the rest of the collection and as taster some images of the Pleistocene animals they came from. Pleistocene in the UK must have looked very similar to Africa in terms of the fauna.
  18. A couple of Canines

    A hunting partner asked me to ID this canine, approximately 1.25 inches. I think I know what it is because of the "ripple" in the enamel, but feel better if backed by TFF expertise. I usually search TFF and the internet for matches and saw an old TFF post from 4 years ago that never quite identified this tooth. This TFF thread discusses Peccary. In the above thread, @Harry Pristismakes this comment: With the wear facet on the outside of the curve, Gary, your find is an upper canine. That's what I seem to have , a very small peccary looking tooth with the wear facet on the outside of the curve. Are there other possibilities for the Peace River Miocene - Pleistocene mix? Thanks for the help, Jack
  19. An excellent and lucky day

    Today I went with 2 friends to a hunting spot that has been productive for months , but was beginning to run out of gravel that one of us had not sifted thru. Most of the morning we spent seeking gravel, and finding small shark teeth, turtle bone, footpads and spurs, a few pieces of mammoth tusk, dugong/manatee rib sections, a couple of baracuda teeth, and one !!!! horse tooth. The day did not improve for my friends. This is actually where LUCK comes in... We have an excellent hunting spot, all 3 of us are excellent hunters with great techniques, we are digging within 20 feet of each other. I got hot at noon; We packed up and left 2 hours later. These days are the ones I recall when I'm the one finding little/nothing. Given all these fantastic finds, you might ask which I liked best... The juve mastodon spit tooth...versus the 2nd Calippus I have ever found. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/46940-three-toed/ I believe that this tooth is Calippus (16.25x19.25x20 mm) but maybe slightly larger than my Calippus Elachistus from May of 2014... Feeling good, Feeling GOOD and unbelievably LUCKY...
  20. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/04/25/humans-stalked-giant-sloths-ancient-footprints-at-white-sands-national-monument-show/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.f4b8d997cab5
  21. Toe Bone, Possible Predator

    I found this toe bone this weekend and am working on an ID. It is from Florida's Peace River, Pleistocene, and is 1.5" long.
  22. LARGE Mammal Earbone

    I was out today, These are interesting times and interesting finds. Many, many goodies, a couple of large gator scutes, a jaw with no teeth that would be an ID candidate, capybara incisor, 5 or 6 Megs including a perfect baby meg, 2 plates of a juve Mammoth tooth, a small canine, and lots more goodies, but I was most excited as soon as I spotted this... I have found llama, horse, porpoise, whale (both toothed and Baleen), and this is bigger by a lot compared to 1st 3 and equal in size to the whales. It is not Toothed, but maybe Baleen. 3x3x1 inches. BIG animal. @Boesse @Harry Pristis
  23. An afternoon on the Zandmotor

    Hi all, So on Tuesday afternoon, I was lucky enough to only have a half day of school. Seeing that the weather was nice, and that I had nothing else to do except go home, I decided to take the bus in the other direction, so to Kijkduin, in order to do some fossil hunting! I bought a sandwich and a chocolate bar at the Shell gas station, and set out on the beach. From the beach of Kijkduin I walked south, so towards the Zandmotor, while of course looking for fossils. View of the beach (mind that the sea is on the right side, on the left side it's just a small lagoon), with the haven of Rotterdam in the background. View of the beach with Kijkduin, and then Scheveningen, in the background. (Sorry for the blurriness...)
  24. Merritt Island Matrix Mysteries

    I wish I wouldn't have started on this matrix again. I'm not getting anything else done. I just went back through all the old posts, so hopefully I'm not being redundant with my questions. #1 - Wild guess here - some sort of suprascapula? #2 - I don't know whether the bone can be identified. Considering the condition of the bones that come out of this matrix (usually very good), what do you think the chances are that the little gouges on this are feeding traces? #3 - I'm thinking reptile jugal or quadratojugal on this, but just a wild guess. Julianna had posted a similar bone a while back but didn't get any takers. More to come once I get additional photos. @old bones @MarcoSr
  25. Canines

    I was out yesterday and at first I was having trouble finding fossils in the gravel -- a not unheard of complaint from fossil hunters. But then I found a clay bottom and prospects improved. Couple of Equus, mammoth frag, dolphin vert and some decent hemis including some teeth that came out of the clay with BV white roots. I found a couple of canines, one early and I am not positive that it is fossil, Now to a canine coming off of the clay bottom... So I do not think this is gator or marine mammal; 1st canine = 1.25 inches, 2nd canine is 1.125 inches. Note the wear pattern from grinding against an opposing (canine ?). May not ID this last one, but any narrowing of the possibilities is appreciated. Thanks, Jack
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