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Found 630 results

  1. Hi There, I have a few collecting vices (?) but bottles and bivalves are sadly not on that list. Up for grabs is a GPR bottle, which has lost some of its purple color and was made in a mold. Soon after the turn of the century 1920's - ish ? No breaks. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. I didn't say that I haven't owned several bottles in the past har har ... The bivalve is something I'm assuming is fairly common and possibly still an extant species but it is both halves. I see these occasionally so if you want more just give me a PM and I'll keep an eye out. Both of these were found either in the Savannah river mud or washing out from dredged material. Pliocene - Pleistocene Nothing in return just a wave and a smile. Cheers, Brett
  2. Robu, M., 2016. The assessment of the internal architecture of an MIS 3 cave bear bone assemblage. Case study: Urşilor Cave, Western Carpathians, Romania. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 444, pp. 115-123. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marius_Robu https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287505090_The_assessment_of_the_internal_architecture_of_an_MIS_3_cave_bear_bone_assemblage_Case_study_Ursilor_Cave_Western_Carpathians_Romania Robu, M., Mirea, I.C., Petculescu, A. and Constantin, S., 2018. Palaeoichnology of an MIS 3 cave bear settlement–Urşilor Cave (Western Carpathians, Romania). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 493, pp. 126-135. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marius_Robu https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322323335_Palaeoichnology_of_an_MIS_3_cave_bear_settlement_-_Ursilor_Cave_Western_Carpathians_Romania Robu, M., 2016. Fossil population structure and mortality analysis of the cave bears from Urşilor Cave, north-western Romania. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 61(2), pp. 469-476. https://www.app.pan.pl/article/item/app002012015.html https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283891821_Fossil_Population_Structure_and_Mortality_Analysis_of_the_Cave_Bears_from_Ursilor_Cave_North-Western_Romania Robu, M.V., 2016. Age re-assessment of the cave bear assemblage from Urşilor Cave, north-western Romania. International Journal of Speleology, 45(2), p. 123-133.http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1947&context=ijs Robu, M.V. http://acad.academia.edu/MariusRobu https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marius_Robu Yours, Paul H.
  3. My Woolly Rhino 2018

    It has been a few years since I posted an update on my woolly rhino composite skeleton. Due to regulation change, not a whole lot of bones are fished out of the North Sea these days. So I haven't gotten many new bones in recent years. But last week I got a whole bunch of extra bones so I got the rhino out of the many boxes I have it stored in for the most time and so it's time for another progress update. For those who've missed my previous posts. I have been collecting wooly rhino (coelodonta antiquitatis) bones for over a decade now ever since I got a few leg bones for my birthday. One thing spiraled into another and before I knew it I was trying to make a complete skeleton. Almost all the bones are from the North Sea where only isolated bones are ever found. So none of the bones have any context, which is why a composite skeleton is the only option. Of course this brings it's own problems, besides spending years trying to find all the correct bones, but also getting bones that actually match nicely. So some bones aren't an exact match but every once in a while I replace bones that don't match that good with better ones. And by now I have just over a hundred bones plus change for the extra bones I have doubles for. The skeleton is quite massive. Woolly rhinos were around the same size as modern African rhinos. Carrying over a hundred rhino bones up and down the stairs was also a good workout The only bone that isn't real is the skull, which is a replica cast. Only two bones come from different locations, one from a quarry in the Netherlands and the other from Hungary. All the other bones come from the North Sea. The neck is complete and I'm only missing one dorsal vertebra. I've got a partial sacrum with the front missing. I don't have any tail vertebrae. I've got a few ribs but not nearly enough and two large hip fragments. I've got all the big long bones except for the fibulae and one shoulder blade. By now I've got the hands fairly complete. I've got all the wrist bones, all the metacarpals. The phalanges however are harder to get and I don't have any unguals. On the hind legs I now also recently got the kneecaps as well as a few missing ankle bones. I'm only missing two ankle bones on both feet. I got all the metatarsals and the phalanges here are a similar story, I have the first phalanges, and one of the second. But again, no unguals. A beautiful humerus that now replaced a less complete dinky humerus. Left front hand of the rhino and my right foot for scale. And lastly there's this really nice nasal fragment where the horn would attach in life. It's just a small fragment, but the preservation is really quite nice. Some of the sutures can also be seen really nicely.
  4. Pleistocene bones, UK

    Found these bone fragments at Stutton Ness in the U.K. a few of days ago. They were right at the base of the Pleistocene ‘cliff’ deposits and have orange staining like the matrix in the cliffs. I’ve read that these deposits are 210,000 year old interglacial. Apparently lion, straight-tusked elephant, horse, giant deer and bison have been found here in the past. I have no experience of these type of finds and wondered if anyone had any thoughts on what species they may be or is that impossible with these small fragments? Also, should I try to conserve them, paraloid maybe? Thanks in advance for any help. P.s. I know the two white bones on the left are modern
  5. Dasyurus sp. (Quoll) left maxilla

    Could belong to either Dasyurus viverrinus (Eastern Quoll), D. maculatus (Tiger Quoll) or D. geoffroii (Western Quoll).
  6. estero scallop, pleistocene, id?

    I came across this beautiful scallop, and unfortunately it was tightly bonded to a piece of limestone ( I only had my fingers to chip it out, and that wouldn't have worked, couldn't even dig at the hard clay) but it was so beautiful with all the little spines. when I tried to i.d. it from the Florida Paleontology site, I could only come up with Antillipecten antillarum...is that a good guess, or does someone have a better one. Perhaps someone recognizes it instantly. I found it on a construction site near Estero FL, which means it is probably pleistocene. Thanks.
  7. Small rodent humerus ? Savannah, Georgia

    Hello, I have what I think is a small humerus from a rodent of some kind ? This is dredge material so it can range from Pliocene to Pleistocene. Was curious if it was possible to determine the type of rodent. I'm assuming it's too small for a capybara type of animal. @MarcoSr does this resemble anything you have seen ? Cheers, Brett
  8. Jaw bone

    I found this jaw bone today on the Brazos River in Texas. It’s unlike any other I’ve found, I’m wondering if it’s croc or gator maybe? The bone seems to have the pock marked look I’ve seen in pics of jaws of those critters.
  9. Ground Sloth Phalanx ?

    Hello Everyone, My treks to the river total 3 now and it is definitely a hit or miss sort of journey. This is a very worn phalanx of some sort ? Sloth possibly ... ? I'm not sure it's just a wild guess based on what I have seen before and online. @Harry Pristis @Shellseeker My mammal id's are not comparable to those of my South Florida fossil hunter masters. I apologize ahead of time these images are not my usual standard. The bones were in a fresh water soak and were still drying .... Size: 3 inches Long -- 1.5 inches wide Thanks, Brett
  10. Hey guys Going thru some old scraps/finds and was just wanting to get your quick opinion if this scrap has enough identifying characters to say its part of Mammoth tooth. There are what appears to be 3 small lobes and was wondering if this is the beginning exposure of a plate? 1st photo is a view of the occlusal surface? showing the 3 lobes and along the right edge would be part of the next plate? 2nd photo is a side view/section showing the enamel lobes? The 3rd photo is a cross section thru the tooth showing the enamel thickness? and lastly a diagram of showing how small a fragment this is and where I was wondering the fragment might be from on the tooth? OK to tell me I'm crazy and would be happy hearing it was actually something else...LOL. Thanks for looking! Regards, Chris Diagram from here. https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Diagram-of-a-mammoth-molar-in-occlu-sal-and-lateral-views-showing-measurements-taken_fig1_11662193?_sg=Pl16q6yiCauAZ6wLhUqBPf7rUg9RKhL7d2FiY3vCAtdodBf6fbt2OybIwdjGaaB0lpVlx_jelzjs3UoTDi-61g The Origin and Evolution of the Woolly Mammoth Article (PDF Available)  in Science 294(5544):1094-7 · December 2001 with 303 Reads DOI: 10.1126/science.1056370 · Source: PubMed Adrian Lister, Andrei V. Sher
  11. Distal femur

    This distal femur measures about 6 1/4” x 4 1/2”. I think it’s from a bison. Any other thoughts? Found on the Brazos River in Southeast Texas.This distal femur measures about 6 1/4” x 4 1/2”. I think it’s from a bison. Any other thoughts? Found on the Brazos River in Southeast Texas.
  12. Hello everyone! I'm taking the wife and kids to South Padre Island in a couple of weeks. Of course I'm hoping to find some fossils while I'm down there. I've read about people finding some Pleistocene fossils while on the beach. Does this seem far fetched? Any advice would be much appreciated. Thank you.
  13. Bunch of micro-mollusks

    Hi all, A handful of days ago there was a sand pile right in my neighborhood. Not sure why it was there, probably someone was making constructions to their house, but in any case I was happy. That's because that kind of sand comes straight from the North Sea, which is full of Eemian fossil sediments! So I took a little plastic bag and spent an hour or two looking in that pile of sand for fossils. The very common Eemian bivalves came up abundantly (so species like Mactra plistoneerlandica, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, Macoma balthica, etc), but that is not what I was too excited about. Seeing that the sand pile was rather small, it forced me to focus on just that little pile. Which is great, because therefore I actually started looking much more closely, and hereby also collecting tiny micro-fossils! Lots of gastropods, which is awesome because these are not as common as bivalves in these sediments. I namely found a complete yet puny Anomia ephippium, some very small Cerastoderma's, and also the ones attached. I would love to be able to bring these down to species level. So I am asking for your help! The Hague, Netherlands (from North Sea sediments) Eem Formation Eemian, Pleistocene; 120'000 y Thanks in advance, Max #1: Looks a little bit like Macoma balthica, but still a bit different... Very likely from the Tellinidae
  14. The tide tables for the Bank Holiday weekend suggested we should perhaps make a return visit to Beltinge to search for more sharks teeth, but the weather forecast put us off; predicted onshore winds would probably hold the water in the estuary preventing the best parts of the beach from being uncovered. So, having been offered the use of a caravan on the north Norfolk coast, we decided a change of scene would be interesting and looked forward to the challenge of a new beach to search. East Runton and West Runton beaches are famous for their geology and wealth of fossils. Rocks from the Cretaceous onwards are present and a wide variety of finds can be made if conditions are favourable. Several recent postings on social media showed some lovely mammoth teeth and other bones had been found, probably brought ashore by the strong north-easterly winds during the winter and early spring. Due to other commitments we didn't arrive until late on Sunday night. The following morning we were greeted by bright sunshine but there was no rush to get down to the beach as the tide wasn't due to uncover the foreshore until late morning. After a leisurely breakfast we headed down to the beach. Unfortunately for most of the holidaymakers, the northerly breeze had brought thick fog off the sea and it clung to the coast, turning the conditions decidedly cold and damp - not good for making sandcastles and having picnics, but fine for fossil hunting! The majority of the morning visitors had abandoned the beach and we had the place pretty much to ourselves. Looking east towards Cromer. Not much sign of spring bank holiday visitors!
  15. Florida small carnivore tooth for ID

    My daughter found this little tooth and we would love an ID if possible. It’s about 5/8 of an inch across the crown and is missing one root. Thanks in advance @Harry Pristis
  16. I know very little on Pleistocene fossils but I always thought the horses that roamed during the Ice Age were much smaller than the modern ones. I found this large solid rock horse cannon bone fossil at the North Sulphur River Texas which is comparable in size to the modern day ones I find. I'm 100 % sure it's a fossil. Sorry I can't take measurements but I'm offshore working. Lol you can use my 6 yr old grandson for scale.
  17. Hunting between thunderstorms and deeper water. During the rest of the season, I note those places where I am finding fossils but have low water conditions...because of lower back issues, I generally refuse to hunt where I must bend over the screen. However, I do remember where such spots exist for days like today. An excellent day, some unusual, finds, a couple of megs, and then these: A odd bone, I have not previously found, but believe to be an Equus Splint bone: Another interesting fossil which I think most likely a large Sloth dermal scute. Finally, my best find of the day, a piece of jaw with a Hemiauchenia m3 molar in nice cream - brown colors.. These are really nice finds... but I was cherishing the end days of the 2017-2018 season with a friend on a day with sunshine in the morning and rain clouds later in the day. Does not get better than this... Jack
  18. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  19. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  20. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  21. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  22. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  23. Partial Tooth ID

    Found this partial tooth while hunting in N. Central Texas. Clearly mammal but not sure if there is enough to get an ID.
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