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Found 715 results

  1. This is interesting. Scientists Spot What May Be a Giant Impact Crater Hidden Under Greenland Ice By Meghan Bartels, Space.com, November 14, 2018 https://www.space.com/42431-giant-impact-crater-hidden-under-greenland-ice.html The open access paper is: Kurt H. Kjær, Nicolaj K. Larsen, Tobias Binder, and many others A large impact crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland. Science Advances 14 Nov 2018:Vol. 4, no. 11, eaar8173 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar8173 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/11/eaar8173 Yours, Paul H.
  2. two vertebrae for ID please

    I'm referencing my books and gallery resources here on the forum, but I'll post these also and see how it goes. River finds from north Florida... Thank you in advance for your inputs.
  3. I don't read a lot about hominid fossils but I try to keep up with general knowledge of recent finds and discussions. Sometimes, the various science magazines will publish a special issue on the subject and I try to pick up a copy. The September issue of Natural History is devoted to human origins with a few articles with even one on the ancient primates of the Paleocene and Eocene along with a reprinted column by the late Stephen J. Gould. I haven't read it yet but leafed through it (nice artwork and fossil photos in it). I had seen it that month at a local Barnes & Noble but the last copy was all bent-up like an accordion. I looked for it at another store but couldn't find it. I went back to pick up the beat-up one I had seen but it was gone. After hunting around the magazine website, I found that back issues were available so I mailed away for it ($7 including shipping). Ten days later, it arrived. In case anyone else is interested, here's the link to page with the back issue address - just scroll down to it: http://www.naturalhistorymag.com/contact.html
  4. Gift from the Sea

    From the album OBX

    It's amazing what washes up on the Outer Banks - modern sea shells, sea glass, bits of wrecked ships and fossils, too! These shells embedded in sandstone washed ashore on Hatteras Island, NC, from the Pleistocene sandstone shelf on which the island rests.
  5. Scallop Hash Plate

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbous hash plate Pleistocene Found washed ashore at Avon Pier, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
  6. Fossil Sand Dollar

    From the album OBX

    Echinoid (Sand dollar) Pleistocene Found washed ashore at Avon Pier, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
  7. Outer Banks Treasures

    My hubby and I went to Hatteras Island, North Carolina this past week for some fun in the wind. But, I just can't go to the beach without beachcombing. Most of the beaches I visited were rather slim pickings for even decent modern shells. I finally did a Google search for the best shelling beaches on the Outer Banks and came up with a few beaches spread across the archipelago. The south side of Cape Hatteras was one of the best and quite close to where we were staying, so off I went. Wow. Colorful, unbroken shells lay thick on the tide lines and scattered across a wide, sandy plain. Here and there, blocks of sandstone (broken off the Pleistocene shelf that holds up the islands) were scattered. The surfaces exposed to the wind were sandblasted to expose the shells inside. Most of the shells retained their original colors. My suspicion is that they were buried while deep enough under water that they didn't have an opportunity to fade. The result is that the fossils - almost all extant species - were only distinguishable from their modern descendants by the clinging matrix. Fossil corals were also scattered sparsely across the sand. These are a bit easier to recognize as fossils as the closest coral reefs to Cape Hatteras are some 75 miles off shore. You can see more finds from this trip here:
  8. Fossil Tube Worms, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Tube worms Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  9. Fossil Tube Worms, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Tube worms on the interior of a Mercenaria shell Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  10. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  11. Fossil Mussel Shells, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Mytilus edulis Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch
  12. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Family Venridae Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  13. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Family Venridae Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  14. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  15. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Family Venridae Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  16. Fossil Clam Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Mercenaria sp. Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  17. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  18. Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  19. Pleistocene Fossil Scallop Shell, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Agropecten gibbus Pleistocene Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are metric-ly challenged.
  20. Pleistocne Coral, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are meric-ly challenged.
  21. Pleistocene Coral, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are meric-ly challenged.
  22. Plesitocene Corals, Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    2.5 cm = 1 inch for those who are meric-ly challenged.
  23. Hi everyone ! I'm here to show you some of my new fossils which are also in my collection.This time something much different.I have mammoth bone parts,found in Danube river,place is called Ram,near Belgrade.I've got them as a gift from a friend. U can see first the part of the lower jaw of the Juvenile Mammoth,a scapula part,part of the mammoth molar and many parts of Mammoth tusk fragments.They are not from the same individual and it's unknown if it's from Woolly Mammoth,Mammuthus trogontherii or from Mammuthus meridionalis.Enjoy. Pozdrav, Darko
  24. Pleistocene Clam Shell. Cape Hatteras

    From the album OBX

    Look ma, no prep work! This clam shell may look like it is just resting on a rock, but it was once inside it. Constant winds on the beach at Cape Hatteras, NC, sand-blasted the matrix to expose this beautifully colorful Mercenaria sp.
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