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Found 747 results

  1. Microcyphus sp. (Agassiz 1846)

    From the album Echinodermata

    4cm. diameter. Pleistocene From Hurghada, Egypt
  2. Echinometra sp. (Gray 1825)

    From the album Echinodermata

    7x5.5x3cm. Pleistocene From Hurghada, Egypt
  3. Reindeer vertebra

    From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A reindeer, Rangifer tarandus, vertebra found on the Zandmotor, about 40'000 years old ("Mammoth-steppe" period, in the Late Pleistocene). It seems to have been bleached by the sun (most bones on the Zandmotor are darker than this).
  4. Complete prehistoric buffalo skull found in Cambridgeshire quarry by Jamie from Fossils Galore in March By Sarah Cliss Fenland Citizen, January 16, 2019 https://www.fenlandcitizen.co.uk/news/complete-prehistoric-buffalo-skull-found-in-cambridgeshire-quarry-by-jamie-from-fossils-galore-in-march-9059305/ Yours, Paul H.
  5. Florida Pleistocene Bone

    I recently aquired these bones in a creek off the Peace River. I found it along with some other Pleistocene era things. Does anyone know what animal this belongs to or what type of bone it is? I can't find anything like it.
  6. Pleistocene mammal mandible ID

    I found this today along with a full bison skeleton in Collin County Texas north of Dallas. It is a Pleistocene lower mandible of a mammal, but I’m not sure what kind. Any thoughts? It is partially mineralized. More so than my bison. Any help would be appreciated.
  7. A day on the caloosahatchee

    A friend and I headed out on the caloosahatchee this morning. We went to our favorite location hoping to find some more Lions Paw's. The start of the day was wonderful. We got on the river near Alva just as Dawn was beginning to break. There had been a controlled burn yesterday so the sky was lit up orange and gold and beautiful. The river was medium height. But there was no wind and early in the morning the big Yachts don't create so many waves. We had it down to our favorite spot checking the walls along the river all the way down. On the way down I found a couple of pieces of antler although it's not shown in the photograph. As usual we found lots of pieces of turtle shell which I've been saving hoping to set into a concrete table top. They're so plentiful but I just thought they would be really cool. Has we got to our spot and started digging my friend had a couple of strombus fall out of the wall. That was followed by the only Lions Paul we found. We found a whole range of other things as you can see from the photograph my favorite is the vasum horridum. I have a large piece of antler or horn I can't identify. so i'll be posting that this week hoping someone can help. sorry for The lack of scale. these are in the tailgate of it truck
  8. Incisors

    Good evening, I explore sites around Travis county here in Texas and stumbled upon these three around Lake Travis area. Been having a hard time with identifying them, found inside a rockshelter nearly 40 foot back from entrance on surface
  9. Laos / Cave fossils shed light on the world of 80,000 years ago By: Uffe Wilken, Sotheast Asia Globe, January 10, 2019 https://sea-globe.com/lao-cave-fossils/ Tam Pa Ling Cave - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tam_Pa_Ling_Cave A couple of papers: Pierret, A., Zeitoun, V. and Forestier, H., 2012. Irreconcilable differences between stratigraphy and direct dating cast doubts upon the status of Tam Pa Ling fossil. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(51), pp.E3523-E3523. https://www.pnas.org/content/109/51/E3523.short Shackelford, L., Demeter, F., Westaway, K., Duringer, P., Ponche, J.L., Sayavongkhamdy, T., Zhao, J.X., Barnes, L., Boyon, M., Sichanthongtip, P. and Sénégas, F., 2018. Additional evidence for early modern human morphological diversity in Southeast Asia at Tam Pa Ling, Laos. Quaternary International, 466, pp.93-106. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/314164578_Additional_evidence_for_early_modern_human_morphological_diversity_in_Southeast_Asia_at_Tam_Pa_Ling_Laos https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320628876_Early_Modern_Humans_from_Tam_Pa_Ling_Laos_Fossil_Review_and_Perspectives https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Fabrice_Demeter Yours, Paul H.
  10. Coral head ID,

    With the Peace river a bit too high to fossil hunt, I have been heading to some of my other favorite jaunts...there is a little stream ( only 2 feet wide) that meanders through Lee County just a little north of the Caloosahatchee - it probably feeds into another larger creek, though I haven't bothered finding it ...at any rate, with permission, I have hunted it for a few years now. This however is the first interesting coral head I found there. It is like iron...i know the coloration is from exposure, but the coral itself is extremely hard...those top edges are sharp like kiives. It seems to be part of a larger globular coral, as the inside/bottom has that tell tale curvature to it. I have included a closeup of the septa on the bottom, but on the top they are so deep as to not be seen...just that honeycomb effect. is that because the septa are softer and worn out, or were they naturally recessive in this type of coral...and of course, can someone tell me what it is.
  11. Yukon paleontologist’s fossils are pure gold: Grant Zazula will be giving the 19th annual Dr. John Rae Lecture in Hamilton, focusing on the amazing lode of fossils and ancient DNA in the Yukon, and its connection with the hunt for gold. by Jeff Mahoney, The Hamilton Spectator https://www.thespec.com/opinion-story/9117772-yukon-paleontologist-s-fossils-are-pure-gold/ Paul H.
  12. https://phys.org/news/2019-01-fossil-prehistoric-deer-argentina.html
  13. It was a long day, but a good one. I took my kids to 2 museums of sorts today. I drove the 2 hours down to the Waco mammoth site, which is now a National Monument as of 2015. It was cool to see and reasonably nice. It was very clean and neat, maybe just a bit too much so since it is supposed to be an active dig site. They have a very small visitors center combo gift shop, maybe 10 people could be in there at once. There are guided tours maybe every 30 min or so. Our guide was a National Park ranger in uniform. The was one other in uniform and a third not in uniform, who could have been a student. There is a nice paved path through lightly wooded Texas scrub as I call it. The path is good for the handicapped or stroller toting parent. They had little booklets for the junior ranger sorts with pics of plants and other life that may be found along the way, with coloring pages and facts about mammoths. Dogs were allowed on a leash. Just a few yards down the path is a 250 year old Texas live oak tree. I was actually a bit on the disappointed side with it. Part of that is because I’ve been to the South Dakota mammoth site, which is well developed. Those are wooly mammoths though, not the Columbian mammoths we have in Texas, which are considerably larger. The other part that probably had something to do with me being a bit disappointed was that I had expectations of seeing excavated mammoths on display. The dig site has been open and running for over 40 yrs. The initial discovery was made in 1978 by two teens out looking for arrowheads. 23 mammoths were excavated between 1978 to 1997. Per the website "Between 1978 and 1990, the fossil remains of 16 Columbian mammoths were discovered. Their efforts uncovered a nursery herd that appears to have died together in a single natural event. Between 1990 and 1997, six additional mammoths were excavated, including a large male (bull). Crews also uncovered the remains of a Western camel (Camelops hesternus), dwarf antelope, American alligator, giant tortoise, and the tooth of a juvenile saber-toothed cat (Smilodon sp.), which was found next to an unidentified animal." So I had the expectation that at least one of the mammoths would be mounted and on display. I believe many of the mammoths are complete. Our guide, a National Park ranger was very new and didn’t know much. Her answer to where are the bones of the 23+ was “They’re in plaster casts at Baylor.” You’d think after all that time and the big paleontology program they have at Baylor something would have been prepped and put on display by now. This is one of the females that is in the process of excavation, but I have a feeling she has been in the process of excavation since she is one of the 23 and the website says the other 6 were discovered by 1997. So, it seems it is not really an active dig site. You can see her teeth there. Sorry the pic isn't that sharp. The lighting inside was very low. This is mammoth Q a male. Supposedly he died 15,000 years later than the female, but there is all of maybe 2.5 between them vertically and maybe 5 feet horizontally. There is a creek maybe 40 feet way, the Brazos River is less than a mile away and the North Fork Bosque River is on the property. Water moves dirt. I seriously doubt there was 15,000 years between 2.5 feet of dirt in a flood plane, which it is in a flood zone. The mammoth bones are not fully mineralized. They are bone and kind of the consistency of chalk and therefore fairly fragile. I think they said this one would have been 14 feet maybe 7 inches tall. He was an average size male. The males are much bigger than the females. This is Q from the other end. Two females are to the right. Parts of 2 males are in front of him. Not all of them are in the pic. The column in the middle there is the reference column. The top of which is supposedly ground level. So it does not seem the male was that deep down in the dirt. The brakes in the ribs and the crushed skull are believed to have happened at the time of his death. There is a broken rib that healed while the mammoth was still living. That break is circled in red. They believe it was most likely due to a fight between bull mammoths where another male's tusks broke the rib which likely resulted in an infection, which healed. The skull is in the foreground. You can see it is crushed in. These are parts of the 2 other male mammoths. The two leg bones together are believed to be one of the individuals. That is all that has been excavated of him from what I gathered, but the guide said those two bones had been accounted for among the other 22 mammoths. This is another female. She is actually in a natural position and they say that she laid like this, because she knew she was not well or was going to die. Sorry for the quality of the pic. But this is a camel skeleton. The skull is in a plaster cast in the bottom kind of center. Signs say as much as I can. I'll post a bit more in the next post.
  14. Hi everyone, My last hunt of 2018 was incredible. And quite surprising too! For Xmas, we went to Middelburg in Zeeland to visit my mother's family, which is always a huge load of fun for me because I get to hang out with all my cousins, that I don't see very often. Anyways, one of the days, they all wanted to do a big walk on one of the beaches. At first they wanted to go to Dishoek, but I managed to convince them to go to the Banjaard instead. Once arrived, we split into 2 groups: one was my mother, my eldest cousin (18), my 2nd-youngest cousin (6), and I. All the rest went to the other group. The other group just walked, but our little group did something much more interesting... You guessed it: fossil hunting! As soon as we got onto the beach, we almost immediately found our first fish vertebra, but after that we seemed to have hit a small dry spell for nothing really worthy was being found. A few common fossil bivalves here and there, but nothing more. For my two cousins, it was their first time fossil hunting, and we had to give them a few examples to show them what to look for. I told them to focus on the fish vertebrae, because these were the easiest to recognize. The smaller one also did a lot of shell-hunting on her own, always picking up the most colorful ones and saying this one was Mama shell, this one Papa shell, this one Sister, etc until she made one giant family of orange shells Then after about an hour or two of hunting with rather little success, we finally hit these little shell banks on the beach. And there, BINGO! Gastropod after gastropod, we couldn't stop finding an incredible amount of them. On the Dutch shores, fossil (and modern too) gastropods are generally much less common than fossil bivalves. So the amount we found here was very surprising!
  15. Nebraska Ground Sloth Claws

    This group of ground sloth claws are all personal river finds from Nebraska.
  16. From the album Cave Bear and Cave Hyena teeth

    Rare Cave Bear fossil teeth and bones from Southeastern Serbia,also Fossil Cave Hyena teeth from the same location. Enjoy :)
  17. Here are some rare teeth and bones from Cave Bear found in Southeastern Serbia,and also some Cave Hyena teeth and one possible canine root from a Brown Bear(not sure).
  18. Smilodon Populator 2

    A new Smilodon populator to start New 2019 ! I hope u will like it!
  19. Small Mammal tooth

    Hunting buddy asked of I could get this tooth Identified. TFF my only chance. Florida Peace River. The curved root seems rare. Maybe an incisor. I have not seen this previously but such a small fossil would easily be missed. Thank for any comments and suggested IDs. Length = 35 mm
  20. Florida Pleistocene Sacrum

    I found this sacrum along with some other Pleistocene bones along Peace River. Does anyone know what animal this may be from?
  21. Florida Pleistocene Sacrum

    I found this sacrum along with some other Pleistocene bones along Peace River. Does anyone know what animal this may be from?
  22. Florida Pleistocene Teeth

    Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum and figured this would be a good first post. I was wading through Peace River and found a couple items that I need help identifying. The first I'm guessing is a tooth or nail. I can't find it anywhere in my Florida vertebrates book. It has a circle in the middle, which may help the identification process, as I have never seen this before. The second item is what I believe to be a piece of Mastodon tooth. There appears to be a crystal grey emamel on the tip of what I think is the root. Any help would be greatly appreciated. .
  23. Fossils of Gotham

    Rockaway Beach, actually within New York City, finally yielded its first vertebrate fossils to me today: a small, beat up, weathered chunk of whale bone, and this wonderful, large bony fish vertebra. It only took 11 years of collecting... Happy New Year all and may 2019 be full of treasures from the deep past!
  24. NSR Mammal Teeth

    From the album North Sulfur River

    NSR Pleistocene mammal teeth. Likely both bison.
  25. NSR Mammal teeth

    These are two pleistocene mammal teeth from the north sulfur river in ladonia, tx. neither are complete. They likely belonged to a camel and a bison.
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