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Found 131 results

  1. Hello all! I haven't done a trip report for a long time so I figured this would be a good time! I went to one for my favorite New Jersey Cretaceous streams on Friday and put in a few miles of walking. It was raining slightly but with hot it's been lately, that was actually appreciated! At the end of a mostly unproductive trip, I decided I was done and would turn around About a minute later, I saw something in the water and picked it up - it ended up being a nearly two-inch long, rooted Plesiosaur tooth!! I couldn't believe it; I've never found a Plesi tooth here this big or any with root so I've been excited all weekend. For the invertebrate fans, I also like the preservation on the bivalves too. Here are all of my 'keepers' for the trip. @Jeffrey P@Trevor@Carl
  2. Hello, new to posting on the forum and fairly new to fossil hunting. Found these very nice marine reptile vertabrae near Osmington Mills, Dorset. All found close together washed out of the Kimmeridgian Clay I think... Age: Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian? 163 - 152mya (both rock types there but I believe the clay cliffs above the beach are Kimmeridgian. Can anyone confirm I have 2 different types (Plesiosaur & Ichthyosaur)? Also any guesses at what species they are likely to be or is it not possible to narrow down from a more generic Ichthyosaurus sp./ Plesiosaurus sp. ? The "Plesiosaur" Vertebra, more chunky and flatter with pits on side. (Could this be a type of Pliosaur like Liopleurodon or Pliosaurus sp. ?)
  3. Cimoliasaurus magnus

  4. Marine reptile tooth ID Lyme Regis

    Hi all, Bought this tooth online a while back. It was sold to me as "Ichthyosaurus platyodon" (which I understand to mean Temnodontosaurus platyodon) from Lyme Regis. Likely found by the seller themselves, as I know they occasionally collect fossils there. However, for the following reasons, I'm not sure about this attribution: Overall, the tooth doesn't look like your typical ichthyosaur tooth to me: It has more of an oval rather than round cross-section It's labolingually flattened Messial and distal carinae run the full length of the crown and divide the tooth into labial and lingual parts While fine striations can be seen on one side of the tooth (presumably the lingual side), the other side (which would be the labial) seems entirely smooth - though some traces of rare striations can be seen on the photographs The striations are much more similar to those of crocodile or pliosaur teeth than to the plicidentine condition so typical of ichthyosaurs The horizontal banding on the tooth surface is unfamiliar to me with respect to most marine reptile teeth I have seen, but occurs much more frequently on crocodile teeth of various species I also bought another tooth with the same attribution from the seller, more or less around the same time. This one has no striations whatsoever, has a more rounded base, is less flattened and has a more rounded tip. It also has carinae. I therefore reclassified it as a probable Goniopholis sp. crocodile tooth. Now I know that not having the root makes it more difficult to identify this particular specimen, but I was hoping someone on this forum might be able to help me, as currently it goes without label. I've considered crocodile, plesiosaur and even pliosaur, but all of these have some reservations that prevent final classification. For one, none of these groups have teeth that are typically flattened like this, nor do plesiosaurs (sensu lato, thus including pliosaurs) have carinae. Crocodiles, then again, would either have or not have striations all around the tooth. And what to make of the banding: is this just preservational, or does it reflect the internal structure of the tooth - i.e. outcome of the tooth's ontological growth? Tooth measures 18 mm and is missing the tip. Thanks in advance for your help!
  5. It was initially being sold as plesiosaur when I inquired about it, but seller says it was mislabelled and is pliosaur--which, if accurate, even better! But I am dubious over Pliosaur ID because I don't think I've ever seen any Morocco pliosaur fossils up for sale. But, if anyone can take a look and let me if A) It looks legit and B ) Whether you think Pliosaur or plesiosaur is accurate, that would be great. 80 million years old, from Morocco. 17 inches along the straight edge and 10 inches along the bottom. Thanks for any help!
  6. Help w/ ID new fossil finds!

    Hello! I'm a pretty novice fossil hunter, so I look for things that stand out! Recently I found these in a span of about two weeks, I haven't seen anything like them before. The small ones all have a flat/facet on the posterior side, same teardrop shape, and the larger ones look like " big ears" to me, lol. I thought maybe iron concecretions at first, but the small ones look different, in that they are not "round". Ammonites? Reminds me of some of the pics posted of plesiosaur fossils, I have more pics, but the files are too big to post all at one time - I would really appreciate any insight! Fossil pic 3.pdf
  7. Plesiosaur?

    Hi all! What do you think of this vertebra? It was found long ago, comes probably from marine Kimmeridgian-Tithonian outcrops in the Volga basin, Russia. Doesn't look exactly like plesiosaur, but what else?
  8. Plesiosaur Tooth

    Have a creek not far from my house that I hunt regularly that turns up a few goodies on every trip. Went out hunting last week and found this partial tooth. I have found Mosasaur bones and teeth here but am pretty sure this tooth is from something else. My thought is plesiosaur due to it having much heavier striations and also looks to have a pretty good curve to it. Thank you for any insight.
  9. Mosasaur vs

    How can you tell the difference from mosasaur and Plesiosaur from NSR?
  10. I've always been fascinated by the Cretaceous sea and its myriad of terrifying carnivores, many that would've made Jaws look meek. After watching BBC's Sea Monsters, I made it my goal to compile a box of sea monster fossils. I started this journey 10 years ago, and finally completed the box recently. Allow me to present my Predators of the Cretaceous Sea collection, and take you on a journey to the most dangerous sea of all times. The box measures 20.25 inches long. Inside are 24 unique predator fossils. I will introduce them from left to right, top to bottom: Rhombodus binkhorsti Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Severn Formation Locality: Bowie, Maryland, USA Size: 1 meters Diet: Molluscs and crustaceans art by Nobu Tamura --------------- Polyptychodon interruptus Age: 105.3 - 94.3 mya | Cretaceous Formation: Stoilensky Quarry stratigraphic unit Locality: Stary-Oskol, Belgorod Oblast, Russia Size: Maybe 7 meters (This is a tooth taxon so size is not confirmed) Diet: Anything it could catch Note: If you consider Polytychodon a nomen dubium, then this is a Pliosauridae indet. art by Mark Witton ----------------- Prognathodon giganteus Age: 70.6 - 66 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Ouled Abdoun Basin Locality: Khouribga Phosphate Deposits, Morocco Size: 10-14 meters Diet: Everything art by SYSTEM(ZBrushCentral) --------------- Coloborhynchinae indet. Age: 99.7 - 94.3 mya | late Cretaceous Formation: Kem Kem Beds Locality: Southeast Morocco Size: 7 meters (high estimate) Diet: Fish and cephalopods
  11. Are there ways to differentiate long neck plesiosaur bones vs. pliosaur bones*(specifically vertebrae from the kimmeridge clay in this case), other than by size, in some cases? *or any of the paddle bones
  12. Mosasaur or Plesiosaur?

    I found a tooth in Bladen County, NC at a site on the Cape Fear River near Elizabethtown. The site is Upper Cretaceous, and is Upper Campanian in age. It's in the Black Creek Group. I know that the tooth isn't in the best of shape, but hopefully is identifiable. All the Mosasaur teeth I had collected there before are a black color. I noticed this tooth is also curved from side to side. I don't know if it's a Plesiosaur or Mosasaur tooth. Both have been found at this site, but the Plesiosaur is far less common.
  13. Plesiosaur tooth/teeth?

    This kind of tooth surface, with the ridges, isn’t that for the most part, not a common plesiosaur feature? This is from Lyme Regis....what would you all think?
  14. Plesiosaur verts?

    Please offer any comments as to the ID of this piece. It was acquired years ago from Poland; but it was reportedly quarried at a Cretaceous site, Goulmima, Morocco. The matrix proved to be far too hard for the low powered tools I utilize for prep; so the piece languished in the garage for years. Finally it was shipped to Kris in Tx. Below is the account of his prep travail. As stated, it was labeled "Plesiosaurus, Cretaceous, Goulmima, Morocco." Any conformation or condemnation will be appreciated. I have real trouble visualizing the relationship between the appearance of the "front" and the "back" of the piece. To my eye it is almost as if the "back" represents the imprint of a different string of verts?!? Here is the display side that finally emerged. Here is the "back" side which was partially visible when the piece was received. Thanks for any observations.
  15. Hello, this is my first post on the forum so firstly I apologise if I have done anything wrong. I brought these teeth a number of years ago and have only just got round to sorting them out. The first one was listed as Jurassic crocodile tooth and the second as Jurassic Plesiosaur tooth, they both come from the Oxford clay around Peterborough. I would really like to put a species name to these teeth if possible so any help would be greatly appreciated. My initial thoughts were Metriorhynchus for the crocodile tooth and Cryptoclidus for the Plesiosaur but I am a complete amateur and would love some help from professionals. Finding information online about the Oxford clay seems to be very difficult. Thanks in advance for your help.
  16. Hello! I am an MPhil student studying plesiosaurs, I am really struggling to locate Cretaceous aged specimens. Since I am based in the UK, most of the museum collections contain Jurassic age fossils so you can image I have an abundance of these! I thought it would be best to ask on the fossil forum since people from all over the world use this. Does anyone know of any museums in Europe or the US that contain large marine reptile collections that might contain a lot of plesiosaurs?
  17. I've spent a fair amount of time now combing the beaches around Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England, and thought i would put together a topic that presents all of my marine reptile bone finds (so far) in one place. The fossils here are Early Jurassic in age, approx. 195-190 million years old and come predominantly from the Blue Lias and Charmouth Mudstone formations. I first visited this area in 2013 with the simple goal of finding at least one ichthyosaur vertebra, and now after three subsequent trips in 2014, 2017 and 2019, i've put together a far better assortment of finds than i could have possibly hoped for! I think i have been quite lucky along this coastline, although it has taken many hours to amass this collection. Across all four of my England trips i have spent a total of 18 days looking for bones in the Lyme Regis area, most often on the stretch of beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth but sometimes at Monmouth Beach as well. This coastline also produces a large quantity and diversity of ammonites, belemnites, crinoids, bivalves, brachiopods, gastropods, and even rare insects. However i've always been most interested in fossil vertebrates, and so the ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs that are found here have been my primary target for collecting. There are also some impressive articulated fish to be found, but as yet i have had no luck in finding any! Ichthyosaur bones are the most common type of vertebrate fossil in the area, particularly their bi-concave vertebrae. Less commonly you can also find pieces of the jaw, sometimes with teeth. If you are extra lucky though you may also find plesiosaur bones, which for whatever reason are much rarer than those of ichthyosaurs. The best way to find any type of marine reptile bone around Lyme Regis is to closely examine the shingle on the beach, and i've spent seemingly countless hours bent over and slowly walking along the shore looking for them. If you have a bad back it's even more difficult! I've learnt that bones can be found pretty much anywhere on the beach: in the slumping clays, at the top of the beach in the 'high and dry' shingle, along the middle of the beach, at the low tide line, and also underwater amongst the rocky pools and ledges. And just when i start to think that the beach has already been heavily searched and there isn't much left to find, there always seems to be another bone that turns up, often lying in plain sight. The truth is that most people who visit here to collect are not experts and will probably walk past a lot of these bones, as the texture is the most important thing that gives them away and learning to recognise it takes a bit of time. For the sorts of articulated skeletons that sometimes make news headlines and are beautifully intact, searching the shingle is not the way to go, but for a short term visitor like me i think it is the best way of maximising the chances of finding any sort of reptile bone in the shortest amount of time (and something i can take back with me on the plane too!). Without further ado, here are the pics (spread across multiple posts due to file size limits). I've also included as-found pictures for some of these finds to provide a sense of what they look like and how they are found when they are on the beach. The collection so far. Starting first with my favourite Lyme Regis fossil, this is a very nice plesiosaur vertebra that is in great condition! A very rare find! I have been very fortunate to find two plesiosaur vertebrae at Lyme Regis so far, although this one is smaller and more beach-worn than the previous example. Continued below.
  18. Hi all My son and I were looking through some teeth from the NSR and want to get your opinions on this one. We first thought that this was a mosasaur tooth; however, someone suggested that it may be a plesiosaur/elasmosaurid tooth. We wanted to gather some more opinions since we have no idea what it is. The tooth measures 16 x 6 x 6 mm. Thanks and Happy New Year!
  19. Teeth like this confuse me - i believe it is either a Plesiosaur or Pterosaur tooth (listed as Pterosaur from the seller) and it comes from the cretaceous sediments of Stariy Oskol, Belgorod region in Russia according to the description. It is 4cm in length. Any idea what this tooth most likely is? Thanks.
  20. Appendate fossil?

    I’ve never even heard of an appendate bone/fossil, but I’ve definitely never seen on in marine reptile appendages(specifically plesiosaurs). I’ve seen plenty of full paddles, but never anything other than the finger bones/phalanges(?). Do they have any? What does? And is this one?
  21. NJ Cretaceous Tooth - Croc, Mosasaur?

    Found in NJ Cretaceous stream. Not sure if its sawfish, croc or possible mosasaur. Thoughts?
  22. Goulmima teeth identification?

    Hi, i asked previously about a couple of Pliosaur teeth which i now have, but there are these two other teeth from the Goulmima site in Morocco that look quite different and i was wondering if they could be Polycotylid teeth or from some other marine reptile. The first tooth is 6.2cm (2.44 inch) and the other tooth is 4.1cm (1.6 inch). Is it possible to narrow these teeth down when the enamel looks worn?. Thanks.
  23. Potential Plesiosaur paddle bone

    Hi everyone! I found this bone today, my first "proper" dinosaur bone I think! Am I right in thinking it's from a plesiosaur paddle bone? Thanks! Measurements are in cm. Location: Conway formation, New Zealand
  24. https://www.livescience.com/amp/ancient-sea-monster-pliosaur-fossils.html What are your thoughts?
  25. Hi all, I was recently offered this tooth from late Cretaceous of Orensburg, Russia. Most likely Gaisky City District. I can't figure out if it's a Polycotylid plesiosaur or Pterosaur tooth. The overall shape is closer to pterosaur than plesiosaur. However, I am not aware of pterosaur having wrinkling like that, nor do I know of pterosaur teeth being found there. What are your thoughts on this? Thank you.
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