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Found 96 results

  1. Hi everyone! New member here. I am very excited to make my first post. So I came across a vendor today with some cool stuff, but I wanted to run some photos by the forum members first to see: 1) if you think they are real or fake. 2) how much would you expect to pay for a piece like that. Thanks for the help! Item #1 - Mosasaur Jaw To my eyes, this item looks legit as the teeth don't seem to be floating above the jaw with composite all around it, or teeth pointed in different directions. BUT...I know fakes are good and I am relatively new to educating myself to fakes vs real. Item #2 - Another Mosasaur Jaw (top and bottom) Also looks pretty legit to my newb eyes. But I am worried both top and bottom jaws in that position are too good to be true. Item #3 - Croc Skull? My gut reaction is fake...mostly due to the matrix looking like it was smeared on like cream cheese. Item #4 - Plesiosaur Skull and Neck It's apparently from goulmima southern morocco. Sadly I don't have more pics, as I didn't want to handle it and move it around. But I was able to get down low and see that it does have it's teeth. I just couldn't a good picture of it. :-\ The closest comparison I could find was this plesiosaur head/neck from an archived auction house website image. But the matrix around it seems the same.
  2. Plesiosaur/Ichthyosaur teeth

    Hey! Thought I would share a photo of my British Ichthyosaur and Plesiosaur teeth (and 2 Plesiosaur ribs and a shark tooth!) Most of these fossils come from South Wales except for the large tooth. It is suspected to be from Eurycleidus and was found in Aust, England. Plesiosaur teeth from the UK are apparently very rare.
  3. Saw this for sale, and was wondering if these are Plesiosaur vertebra's?. The fossil is from the Goulmima region in South - Eastern Morocco. Thanks.
  4. Current Prep Thread

    So, what do we all havecurrently on the prep table? Be interesting to see what challenges await everybody. My current piece is this bone block, most likely ichthyosaur rib. A few scattered ammonites from the genus Dactylioceras sp. if expecting to probably found more bone further in all being well, probably a vert or two and some more ribs.
  5. New Zealand marine reptile vertebra

    I've got this very worn vertebral centrum from the marine Conway Formation near Oaro (Late Cretaceous; about 79-73 Ma) on the south island of New Zealand. The only two logical candidates are plesiosaur or mosasaur from this formation, both of which are known here. There are characteristics of both groups seen on this bone which is tripping me up a bit. One end face seems a bit concave and the other more convex which is a mosasaur feature, but then there also looks to be two distinct holes on the ventral side (see photo three) which could be the paired foramina that are characteristic of plesiosaur vertebrae. So i am left scratching my head! What do others think? Front face Dorsal view Ventral view (note what look like paired foramina) Lateral view
  6. Plesiosaur femur or humurus?

    Can anyone tell if this is a plesiosaur femur or humurus? Or if not, have any thoughts on what it could be? From what I can tell it seems to have a slightly shorter/heavier curved length, and a more symmetrical curve than most plesiosaur bones Ive seen. I think it looks VERY close, but the slight differences I'm seeing are consistent with almost every plesiosaur bone I'm seeing, which makes me think the slight difference is a tell that it's not. Also, I don't see the ridges on any plesiosaur bones, but I don't know if that's natural to the bone, or from damage from fossilization at some point, but it does look natural to me. Sadly I do not know where it's from(yet), and I don't know yet if it starts to flatten towards one side, which I believe is an absolutely necessary feature. Hopefully I can find out and add that info, but I'd imagine it could still at least potentially be debunked as a plesiosaur bone in the meantime.
  7. Missing pliosaurs?

    This started bothering me from lack of fossils for sale(and tooth prices when they are), and although this is far from anything scientific or reliable, I feel like I hear about plesiosaur fossil finds significantly more than pliosaurs finds(im not really sure how to begin searching for that kind of compiled info). Is there a reason pliosaurs seem to be so rare? As far as fossils for sale, the only thing I can think of, other than pliosaurs being just plain rare(super rare when compared to the number of plesiosaurs), is that for some reason everyone just mistakes/assumes pliosaur fossils are actually from plesiosaurs.
  8. Plesiosaur Vertebra (found 2017)

    From the album Fossils From Lyme Regis And Charmouth

    Collected between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England. Charmouth Mudstone Formation. About 195-190 Ma.
  9. Plesiosaur vertebra

    From the album In-Situ Shots(various locations)

    9-7-18
  10. Plesiosaur vertebra(2)

    From the album Denton County, TX

    9-7-18
  11. Plesiosaur vertebra(1)

    From the album Denton County, TX

    9-7-18
  12. Plesiosaur vertebra(1)

    From the album Denton County, TX

    9-7-18 Denton County, TX
  13. NJ Cretaceous & Mammal Teeth

    Hello everyone, this is Trevor. I have been meaning to post this for a long time and finally got around to doing it. I would appreciate help identifying these finds. Also, stay tuned I have a trip report coming out later this week, probably Friday. What type of ammonite is this? (middle)
  14. Mary Anning short film

    A Mary Anning short film will be aired at @underwirefest this November 2018. The trailer is here :
  15. From a plesiosaur?

    From all the comparing Ive done, i think it almost looks exactly right, except I haven't been able to find any vertebrae with the things on the bottom(chevrons?) shaped like that; that 90degree bend. Is that familiar to anyone? Is that something that appears on plesiosaurs or not? (no better angle of the chevron(?)on the other side)
  16. nj cretaceous stream plesiosaur vert?

    Finally got back out to the streams today and was a beautiful day and great finds,,,,,my wife found what I believe to be plesiosaur if you guys can give us some info please...............thanks
  17. Elasmosaur jaw?

    Could this be a plesiosaur(elasmosaurus) jaw? I tried comparing but it's hard to see the picture of jaws in ideal positions and angles and such. Also, with so many extreme teeth it can be hard to see perfectly in a lot of pictures. (Location-wise and all, it could be, this is just about the physical jaw itself)
  18. Nice surprise today. Only my 2nd Plesiosaur vert in my first 4 years. Ive got about 150-1 ratio Mosasaur to Plesiosaur verts. It’s small but in great condition North Texas Late Cretaceous 86-90 mya
  19. Plesiosaur vertebrae

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Unidentified plesiosaur vertebrea Jurassic period kimmeridge clay weymouth, Dorset U.K.
  20. Plesiosaur and pliosaur teeth

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Pliosaur teeth--liopleurodon ferox(?) & unidentified genera plesiosaur teeth--cryptoclidus sp & cryptoclidus sp (?) lower oxford clay callovian stage middle jurassic 160 mya peterborough, cambridge U.K. Hampton lakes & Bradley Fen.whittlesey
  21. I've been offered this partial jaw. It's not the best example in the whole world, but it does have some in-situ teeth. Does anyone have any thoughts on it? I believe that is actually Plesi and not some obscure Moroccan crocodile, but let me know if it's something else! I assume Elasmosaurus of some kind? The teeth look OK to me, I can't see any obvious sign of tampering, although I am always suspicious that one or two could have been added. No actual signs of it though. Any thoughts would be welcomed. My understanding is that these are extremely rare. But still, rarity's not everything. Apologies for the less-than-great pictures.
  22. News About North Dakota's Plesiosaurs

    Jeff J. Person & Becky Barnes, 2018, New Plesiosaur Exhibit at Heritage Center State Museum. Department of Mineral Resources Geo News. 45(2) pp. 1-4. https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/documents/newsletter/2018Summer/New_Plesiosaur_Exhibit_at_Heritage_Center_State_Museum.pdf https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/newsletter/2018Summer.asp Clint A. Boyd, 2018, A Pleasing Discovery from North Dakota’s Ancient Seas. Department of Mineral Resources Geo News. 45(2) pp. 5-10 https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/documents/newsletter/2018Summer/A_Pleasing_Discovery_from_North_Dakotas_Ancient_Seas.pdf https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/newsletter/2018Summer.asp Yours, Paul H.
  23. I found this a few years ago and it continues to fascinate me. Occasionally my mind wants me to call it Dino but I’m pretty certain this belongs to a Plesiosaur. 9 inches long and weighs almost 10 lbs. North Central TX Late Cretaceous 86-92 mya
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