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Found 19 results

  1. Manicina Coral 4a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Manicina Coral #3 Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Manicina is a genus of stony corals in the subfamily Faviinae of the family Mussidae. It is monotypic, and the only species is Manicina areolata, commonly known as rose coral. It is a colonial species of stony coral. It occurs in shallow water in the West Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, sometimes as small solid heads and sometimes as unattached cone-shaped forms. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Zoantharia Order: Scleractinia Family: Mussidae Genus: Manicina Species: areolata
  2. Manicina Coral 4a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Manicina Coral #3 Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Manicina is a genus of stony corals in the subfamily Faviinae of the family Mussidae. It is monotypic, and the only species is Manicina areolata, commonly known as rose coral. It is a colonial species of stony coral. It occurs in shallow water in the West Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, sometimes as small solid heads and sometimes as unattached cone-shaped forms. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Zoantharia Order: Scleractinia Family: Mussidae Genus: Manicina Species: areolata
  3. Manicina Coral 4a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Manicina Coral #3 Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Manicina is a genus of stony corals in the subfamily Faviinae of the family Mussidae. It is monotypic, and the only species is Manicina areolata, commonly known as rose coral. It is a colonial species of stony coral. It occurs in shallow water in the West Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, sometimes as small solid heads and sometimes as unattached cone-shaped forms. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Zoantharia Order: Scleractinia Family: Mussidae Genus: Manicina Species: areolata
  4. Manicina Coral 4a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Manicina Coral #3 Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Manicina is a genus of stony corals in the subfamily Faviinae of the family Mussidae. It is monotypic, and the only species is Manicina areolata, commonly known as rose coral. It is a colonial species of stony coral. It occurs in shallow water in the West Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, sometimes as small solid heads and sometimes as unattached cone-shaped forms. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Zoantharia Order: Scleractinia Family: Mussidae Genus: Manicina Species: areolata
  5. Manicina Coral 2a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Manicina Coral #2 Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Manicina is a genus of stony corals in the subfamily Faviinae of the family Mussidae. It is monotypic, and the only species is Manicina areolata, commonly known as rose coral. It is a colonial species of stony coral. It occurs in shallow water in the West Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, sometimes as small solid heads and sometimes as unattached cone-shaped forms. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Zoantharia Order: Scleractinia Family: Mussidae Genus: Manicina Species: areolata
  6. Manicina Coral 2a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Manicina Coral #2 Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Manicina is a genus of stony corals in the subfamily Faviinae of the family Mussidae. It is monotypic, and the only species is Manicina areolata, commonly known as rose coral. It is a colonial species of stony coral. It occurs in shallow water in the West Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, sometimes as small solid heads and sometimes as unattached cone-shaped forms. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Zoantharia Order: Scleractinia Family: Mussidae Genus: Manicina Species: areolata
  7. Orbicella faveolata Coral a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orbicella faveolata Coral East Naples, Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Montastraea is a genus of stony corals in the Montastraeidae family. This genus used to contain many species that are now reclassified into different genera, most notably Orbicella. This was classified as Montastraea faveolata (Ellis & Solander, 1786) - now classified as Orbicella faveolata. Orbicella faveolata, commonly known as mountainous star coral, is a colonial stony coral in the family Merulinidae. It is native to the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico and is listed as "endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Colonies of this coral are solid and very large, forming a mound with a skirt. The surface is smooth and undulating, with small lumps, bulges or lobes. The corallites, the stony cups in which the polyps sit, are about 5 mm (0.2 in) in diameter and cover the entire surface of the coral. The colour is usually pale brown but may be deep brown with fluorescent green highlights. This coral is part of a species complex including the closely related Orbicella annularis and Orbicella franksi, but the former has more distinct nodules or small columns and the latter has a more irregular, lumpy surface. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Hexacorallia Order: Scleractinia Family: Merulinidae Genus: Orbicella Species: faveolata
  8. Orbicella faveolata Coral a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orbicella faveolata Coral East Naples, Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Montastraea is a genus of stony corals in the Montastraeidae family. This genus used to contain many species that are now reclassified into different genera, most notably Orbicella. This was classified as Montastraea faveolata (Ellis & Solander, 1786) - now classified as Orbicella faveolata. Orbicella faveolata, commonly known as mountainous star coral, is a colonial stony coral in the family Merulinidae. It is native to the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico and is listed as "endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Colonies of this coral are solid and very large, forming a mound with a skirt. The surface is smooth and undulating, with small lumps, bulges or lobes. The corallites, the stony cups in which the polyps sit, are about 5 mm (0.2 in) in diameter and cover the entire surface of the coral. The colour is usually pale brown but may be deep brown with fluorescent green highlights. This coral is part of a species complex including the closely related Orbicella annularis and Orbicella franksi, but the former has more distinct nodules or small columns and the latter has a more irregular, lumpy surface. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Hexacorallia Order: Scleractinia Family: Merulinidae Genus: Orbicella Species: faveolata
  9. Orbicella faveolata Coral a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orbicella faveolata Coral East Naples, Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Montastraea is a genus of stony corals in the Montastraeidae family. This genus used to contain many species that are now reclassified into different genera, most notably Orbicella. This was classified as Montastraea faveolata (Ellis & Solander, 1786) - now classified as Orbicella faveolata. Orbicella faveolata, commonly known as mountainous star coral, is a colonial stony coral in the family Merulinidae. It is native to the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico and is listed as "endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Colonies of this coral are solid and very large, forming a mound with a skirt. The surface is smooth and undulating, with small lumps, bulges or lobes. The corallites, the stony cups in which the polyps sit, are about 5 mm (0.2 in) in diameter and cover the entire surface of the coral. The colour is usually pale brown but may be deep brown with fluorescent green highlights. This coral is part of a species complex including the closely related Orbicella annularis and Orbicella franksi, but the former has more distinct nodules or small columns and the latter has a more irregular, lumpy surface. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Hexacorallia Order: Scleractinia Family: Merulinidae Genus: Orbicella Species: faveolata
  10. Orbicella faveolata Coral a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orbicella faveolata Coral East Naples, Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Montastraea is a genus of stony corals in the Montastraeidae family. This genus used to contain many species that are now reclassified into different genera, most notably Orbicella. This was classified as Montastraea faveolata (Ellis & Solander, 1786) - now classified as Orbicella faveolata. Orbicella faveolata, commonly known as mountainous star coral, is a colonial stony coral in the family Merulinidae. It is native to the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico and is listed as "endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Colonies of this coral are solid and very large, forming a mound with a skirt. The surface is smooth and undulating, with small lumps, bulges or lobes. The corallites, the stony cups in which the polyps sit, are about 5 mm (0.2 in) in diameter and cover the entire surface of the coral. The colour is usually pale brown but may be deep brown with fluorescent green highlights. This coral is part of a species complex including the closely related Orbicella annularis and Orbicella franksi, but the former has more distinct nodules or small columns and the latter has a more irregular, lumpy surface. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Hexacorallia Order: Scleractinia Family: Merulinidae Genus: Orbicella Species: faveolata
  11. Orbicella faveolata Coral a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orbicella faveolata Coral East Naples, Florida Pliocene Age (5.333-2.58 million years ago) Montastraea is a genus of stony corals in the Montastraeidae family. This genus used to contain many species that are now reclassified into different genera, most notably Orbicella. This was classified as Montastraea faveolata (Ellis & Solander, 1786) - now classified as Orbicella faveolata. Orbicella faveolata, commonly known as mountainous star coral, is a colonial stony coral in the family Merulinidae. It is native to the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico and is listed as "endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Colonies of this coral are solid and very large, forming a mound with a skirt. The surface is smooth and undulating, with small lumps, bulges or lobes. The corallites, the stony cups in which the polyps sit, are about 5 mm (0.2 in) in diameter and cover the entire surface of the coral. The colour is usually pale brown but may be deep brown with fluorescent green highlights. This coral is part of a species complex including the closely related Orbicella annularis and Orbicella franksi, but the former has more distinct nodules or small columns and the latter has a more irregular, lumpy surface. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Hexacorallia Order: Scleractinia Family: Merulinidae Genus: Orbicella Species: faveolata
  12. Possibly Astrangia sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Astrangia sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Astrangia sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  13. Possibly Astrangia sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Astrangia sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Astrangia sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  14. possibly Solenastrea sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Solenastrea sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Solenastrea sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  15. possibly Solenastrea sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Solenastrea sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Solenastrea sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  16. Turitella alticostata a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turitella alticostata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae. They have tightly coiled shells, whose overall shape is basically that of an elongated cone. The name Turritella comes from the Latin word turritus meaning "turreted" or "towered" and the diminutive suffix -ella. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Sorbeoconcha Family: Turritellidae Genus: Turritella Species: †alticostata
  17. Turitella alticostata a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turitella alticostata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae. They have tightly coiled shells, whose overall shape is basically that of an elongated cone. The name Turritella comes from the Latin word turritus meaning "turreted" or "towered" and the diminutive suffix -ella. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Sorbeoconcha Family: Turritellidae Genus: Turritella Species: †alticostata
  18. Ostrea compressirorostra a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ostrea compressirorostra Bivalve SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Ostrea is a genus of edible oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Ostreidae, the oysters. This genus is very ancient. It is known in the fossil records from the Permian to the Quaternary (age range: from 259 to 0.0 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Ostrea includes about 150 extinct species. Ostrea compressirostra is a species of prehistoric saltwater oyster, a fossil that is found in the Eastern United States. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Ostreidae Genus: †Ostrea Species: †compressirorostra
  19. Ostrea compressirorostra a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ostrea compressirorostra Bivalve SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Ostrea is a genus of edible oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Ostreidae, the oysters. This genus is very ancient. It is known in the fossil records from the Permian to the Quaternary (age range: from 259 to 0.0 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Ostrea includes about 150 extinct species. Ostrea compressirostra is a species of prehistoric saltwater oyster, a fossil that is found in the Eastern United States. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Ostreidae Genus: †Ostrea Species: †compressirorostra
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