Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'pliocene'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 481 results

  1. Pliocene Gastropod fossils

    Found these in a large deposit near road cutaway.
  2. Hello all, I recently returned from Peace River with a few finds, including this 15 mm fossil. I believe it's a small herbivore tooth, but I'm new here so would greatly appreciate help on the ID. Thanks!
  3. More Horse of Course?

    Found by my buddy on a river gravel bar/bank in southern Minnesota. As I've stated in some previous posts the geology in our area is upper Cretaceous. However, the river where this specimen was found pulse floods and is like a giant gravel mixer. In the past and more recently Pleistocene fossils have been found in the river gravel deposits in my area (mammoth, bison, etc). It general it is very difficult to age by geology/context. I'm hoping ancient horse but more sets of eyes on it are better. What do you think and thanks!? Any thoughts on age? Ancient horse or not?
  4. Hey everyone! This will be my first attempt at a trade in the TFF. Im offering a variety of fossils from the Price Creek Formation of Humboldt County, Northern California. This formation has been dated to late Miocene early Pliocene. As far as to what I’m looking for in this trade, I love all things Mollusca! Gastropods, Bivalves, Ammonites, Belemnites or Brachiopods, I’ll take them all. Invertebrates of any kind will strike my fancy though. The weirder the better. I’ve seen some Ram’s Horn Oysters that are awesome! I have no qualms about trading for these as a whole set, however shipping would be cheaper. I’m willing to ship anywhere in the United States, if your international I’m afraid that you’ll have to absorb that cost. I really appreciate all the knowledge that members have been forthcoming with sharing. Please pm me if your interested. -Nick
  5. Hello all Up for trade is this Chilean Carcharodon carcharias. It was found in the Huarra formation, near Antofagasta. The tooth is just over 2 inch measured on the longest side. I want to trade this for trilobites, dinosaur, Crocodile or other reptile stuff, Kem Kem material, insects, fossil fish or something surprising. Unfortunately, I will not be able to send this piece untill the quarantine in my country is lifted.
  6. Last one from the Peace River! There’s three ridges where my finger is pointing.
  7. Peace River, Florida bone find

    Another stumper! This one has a sheen to it that doesn’t show up well in the photos. I try to show all sides. It’s cubed in shape.
  8. First time poster! Going through my collection and I have some that stump me. Any idea on this one?
  9. from Peace river, Florida. Thoughts!
  10. Mastixia sp.

    From the album Plantae

    2m. long seed from the brown coal quarry at Frechen, NRW. Late Pliocene
  11. Cetacean Atlas

    Wondering if this could be a dolphin, porpoise, or small whale. Measures 6 x 4 inches. Found Tar river, NC near late Miocene/ early Pliocene geology. Thanks.
  12. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  13. Horse of a Different Color

    Thoughts on age/epoch? Ancient or not? Found on a gravel bar on a river in Southern Minnesota.
  14. Unknown Potential Mollusk Fossil

    Recently found this fossil in Capitola Beach, California. I found an abundance of fossilized shells in the area, but this one looked dissimilar. Anyways, is it possible that this is just a disfigured shell? Or is it something else? Thanks for your time!
  15. Capitola Fossil ID

    Recently stumbled across this, possible, fossil in Capitola Beach, CA. I found an assortment of fossilized shells but was unsure of this find. Anyways, I’m new to fossil hunting and don’t have an exceeding amount of experience, so any knowledge regarding what this could possibly be would be helpful. Thanks!
  16. Hi, just going through some rocks I brought back from Norfolk, UK, thinking quite a few may be fossils (I didn't have long so just grabbed anything I thought looked suspiciously organic by intuition) and as it turns out I think I was quite correct in a number of cases - I think I have quite a few pieces of whale and and a few little bits of mammoth tooth. Trying to confirm this to myself led to a lot of reading and learning online about the local geological formations involved and also whale anatomy, both new topics for me which I always enjoy delving into - part of the enjoyment of fossil hunting for me - I'm less of someone looking for beautiful specimens for display (though I'm not going to turn those down!) and more someone who loves the detective work of trying to identify obscure parts and recreate some aspect of the vanished world before us from its traces. And searching through whale anatomy and what these weird chunks could be I came across a picture of a whale periotic and realised that the weird little pot structure I had was almost definitely one of these, which if I am correct is good because I believe they are one part of a fragmented whale anatomy that is quite diagnostic. Also I then realised that a strangely hooked piece I found right next to it could well be the tympanic! The preservation here is unusual because many theorise that these kind of whale fossils were first laid down in sandstone in the Miocene when Norfolk was covered with a shallow warm sea, and then later in the Pliocene and early Pleistocene when temperatures dropped sea levels dropped too and the area became land (part of the reason the geology of this area is interesting is the constant transgression and regression of the sea over a few million years), these Miocene rocks were eroded away and the harder fossils reworked into new estuarine or nearshore sediments of this era, often but not always with a layer of hard iron-rich concretion coating them which helped protect them (I guess one question would be, is there anyway of easily removing this hard concretion layer?) So if I am right, these are bones from Miocene whales (many showing signs of shark damage), reburied in the Pliocene / Early Pleistocene and then finally eroded out again in the modern day - quite a journey! Anyway, enough background, for starters I'd love to see what people think about this periotic / tympanic. Am I right? Here's a summary of my findings (note I used a pic of dolphin periotic someone posted here for comparison so I hope that isn't too cheeky)
  17. Columbella mercatoria

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Columbella mercatoria (Linnaeus, 1758) Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Golden Gate Member. Location: Bonita Grande Pit, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Also known as the Common Dove Shell. Spiral sculpture varying. A more squat shell than C. rusticoides.
  18. Columbella rusticoides

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Columbella rusticoides Heilprin, 1886 Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Pinecrest Sand Member. Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Common name is the Rusty Dove Shell. Generally smooth at center of the body whorl.
  19. Anachis amydra

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Anachis amydra Dall, 1890 Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Pinecrest Sand Member. Location: SMR Phase 8 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Larger ribs, but fewer in number than C. caloosaensis.
  20. Costoanachis caloosaensis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Costoanachis caloosaensis (Dall, 1890) Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Pinecrest Sand Member. Location: Quality Aggregates, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Highly variable ribbing, strong spirals. Similar to extant C. avara, but larger.
  21. Costoanachis camax

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Costoanachis camax (Dall, 1890) Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Pinecrest Sand Member. Location: APAC Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Strong ribs and spirals along the length of the shell.
  22. Costoanachis clavatula

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Costoanachis clavatula (Olsson & Harbinson, 1953) Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Pinecrest Sand Member. Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Elongated like M. chariessa but aperture is only one-third the length of the shell. Ribs prominent along the sutures.
  23. Macgintopsis chariessa

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Macgintopsis chariessa (McGinty, 1940) Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Golden Gate Member Location: Bonita Grande Pit, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Elongated with aperture half the length of the shell. Smooth with evenly spaced axial nodes on the body whorl.
  24. Sincola gunteri

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Columbellidae Alia gunteri (Mansfield, 1930) Statigraphy: Tamiami Formation, Pinecrest Sand Member. Location: APAC Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Small, squat with shouldered body whorl. Variable ribbing from absent on the abapertural side (pictured) to ribs along the entire body whorl.
×