Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'pliocene'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Bony Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 247 results

  1. Small rodent humerus ? Savannah, Georgia

    Hello, I have what I think is a small humerus from a rodent of some kind ? This is dredge material so it can range from Pliocene to Pleistocene. Was curious if it was possible to determine the type of rodent. I'm assuming it's too small for a capybara type of animal. @MarcoSr does this resemble anything you have seen ? Cheers, Brett
  2. I already posted this hunting trip at the Zandmotor on my last vacation: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/85026-a-beautiful-day-at-the-zandmotor/ I also visited some other locations like a sand pit near Antwerp (Belgium). This was my fourth visit there and probably the most successful until now The Miocene, Pliocene sand was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock and as you can see the area is very overgrown. You can still find there many shark teeth, bones and bivalves. I mainly concentrated on finding shark teeth. Here is picture of the location: This is a picture of my last visit there last year, because my pictures from this visit are all too blurred But the situation didnt change much. I think that the best method to find something there is to dig a bit and sieve the material. Too bad that I destroyed my sieve more or at the beginnig of the day: After that I had to search on the surface but nevertheless I managed to find some cool teeth This was the find of the day: Could this be a tooth of Isurus Hastalis? I am not sure.... Its about 4.6 cm long I was super happy that I could find such a beautiful and big tooth !! Here is my total haul: And here are some more of the better finds: A 4 cm long Isurus Oxynchus:
  3. And another Antwerp bivalve: Veneridae?

    Hi all, Slightly incomplete, but I think that this shell is from the Veneroidea order, and possibly the Veneridae. I would like to narrow that down a little more though, hopefully to species. Is Callista chione perhaps a possibility? It's from Antwerp, Belgium. "Scaldisian" of the Pliocene (3 myo), Kattendijk Formatie (?). Thanks in advance, Max
  4. Antwerp Pycnodonte?

    Hi all, Found this shell in the Antwerp harbor. From the "Scaldisian" of the Pliocene, about 3 myo. I think Kattendijk Formation (can anyone confirm this?). I think it's some kind of shell within the Pycnodonte genus maybe? If so, which one? I am pretty sure that it's from the Ostreidae. Thanks in advance, Max
  5. Fossil bivalves with periostracum???

    Hi all, Found these two shells in Antwerp, Belgium. It was in a place with lots of sand, and the sea was rather far away. There are tons of Pliocene shells there to be found. I also found these two bivalves. What I find really weird is that the periostracum (the brown layer) is still preserved!? How could that be? Nearly all fossil shells lose it when fossilizing, yet these two seem to have kept it. What do you think is the answer to this mystery? Fossils, with the periostracum preserved, or modern (but how did they get here?)? (Or maybe this isn't a periostracum at all. But what is it then?) I think that the species are Mytilus edulis and Spisula subtruncata (although that's by far the biggest Spisula I have ever seen) (both present modern in the North Sea, and occur as fossils in Belgium). I'm greatly anticipating your thoughts on this! Max
  6. Small Antwerp bivalve

    Hi all, Found this small bivalve in Antwerp, Belgium. Most likely from the Pliocene. That hinge is weird, with that thing sticking out (almost like the Mya shells!). Anyone know what species this is? Thanks in advance! Max
  7. By any chance does anyone recognize these little orb/circular structures/features in some of the damaged Vermicularia tubes in these shots? Not sure if they might be simply immature bivalves or something else? I pried out a few of them and I'm no wiser as they are so small and I dont see any real features/markings under magnification... The two that I pried out are approx .5mm wide but the others still in the tubes are a bit bigger. The 2nd and third frames in the 2nd photo makes them look like something that could be a small echinoid with star shaped markings but that might be deceiving. they actually look more like absolutely smooth micro PVC endcaps, not spheres/orbs. In my other recent Garage finds thread Adam had a good question about operculums and I dont even know if they had one or not...So if you all have any insight I'd love to hear/know.. Thanks for the help. Regards, Chris
  8. Stormwater ditch

    So noticed a few weeks ago that the stormwater division was widening and refortifying a drainage ditch in N. Charleston SC. So as you all suggest and I always try to do I got permission to search the area and came up with many Great White and Angustiden teeth as well as many many bones I could not identify. However this thick, what I assume is a rib bone caught my attention being so thick. The ditch is in the Miocene/Pliocene era Im assuming and just wondering if this would be a whale rib or a dugong. Any suggestions would be great.
  9. Hi all! I've been away from the site for a bit - I taught my first historical geology lecture this spring, and ended up spending three nights a week working on a lecture til the wee hours of the morning, and so the last month has left me without enough time to follow up on the forum. I'll try to get caught up over the next few days. I have a bazillion missed messages from people, so I'll get through them ASAP! This weekend I wrote a new (and very long) blog post about the geology, paleontology, and history of the Ashley Phosphate Beds in the Charleston area - a must read for anyone confused about our stratigraphy! http://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2018/05/the-ashley-phosphate-beds.html
  10. Morus peninsularis

    Proximal end of right ulna. Very well preserved with amazing quill knobs. Brodkorb, Pierce 1955. The Avifauna of the Bone Valley Formation. Florida Geological Survey Report of Investigations, 14: 57 pages, 8 tables, 11 plates. S M I T H S O N I A N C O N T R I B U T I O N S TO P A L E O B I O L O G Y • NUMBER 90 Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III Clayton E. Ray and David J. Bohaska,Editors Storrs L. Olson and Pamela C. Rasmussen, 2001 Miocene and Pliocene Birds from the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina
  11. North Carolina Pliocene Bird Bone

    I found this bone today in Edgecombe County North Carolina on the Tar River, upper Yorktown Formation, Rushmere member. The area is well known for Chesapectens along with other bivalves and gastropods. I looked at the Smithsonian publication, Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III. Miocene and Pliocene Birds from the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina. Storrs L. Olson and Pamela C. Rasmussen. Issued May 11, 2001. After searching the many plates I found one that is a pretty good match. The proximal end of right ulna of Morus peninsularis. a Gannet. I am looking for your opinions on this. @Auspex It is plate 14 page 333. I would love to have this positively I.D.'d. It was found in the formation, partially exposed and 2 pieces. They fit together well. Overall length is 144.4 mm or 5.68 inch.
  12. Teeth and bone fragments

    Found these in the Peace River in Florida a couple days ago. Pretty sure the first tooth is from a gator, not sure about the others, maybe tips from something like wales or big cats? Also I'm not sure what these other fossils are, some kind of fish mouth plate or something? Thanks for any help! Tooth # 1 Gator I think... Tooth #2 Gator? something else? \ object #3 something from a fish or ray? reverse side... toothe #4 Another tooth tip, solid inside, but only the end of the tip it looks like...
  13. Scientifically vital fossils vanish, Masol’s claim to fame in danger Siddarth Banerjee | TNN | April 30, 2018 https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/scientifically-vital-fossils-vanish-masols-claim-to-fame-in-danger/articleshow/63969904.cms 2.6-million-year-old ‘priceless’ fossil on sale for just Rs 4500 Sidharth Banerjee | TNN | July 24, 2017 https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/2-6-million-year-old-priceless-fossil-on-sale-for-just-rs-4500/articleshow/59729760.cms Some papers are: Chapon-Sao, C., Abdessadok, S., Tudryn, A., Malassé, A.D., Singh, M., Karir, B., Gaillard, C., Moigne, A.M., Gargani, J. and Bhardwaj, V., 2016. Lithostratigraphy of Masol paleonto-archeological localities in the Quranwala Zone, 2.6 Ma, northwestern India. Comptes Rendus Palevol, 15(3-4), pp. 417-439. https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01323986/ Malassé, A.D., Moigne, A.M., Singh, M., Calligaro, T., Karir, B., Gaillard, C., Kaur, A., Bhardwaj, V., Pal, S., Abdessadok, S. and Sao, C.C., 2016. Intentional cut marks on bovid from the Quranwala zone, 2.6 Ma, Siwalik Frontal Range, northwestern India. Comptes Rendus Palevol, 15(3-4), pp. 317-339. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292209224_Intentional_cut_marks_on_bovid_from_the_Quranwala_zone_26_Ma_Siwalik_Frontal_Range_northwestern_India https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anne_Dambricourt_Malasse Malassé, A.D., Singh, M., Karir, B., Gaillard, C., Bhardwaj, V., Moigne, A.M., Abdessadok, S., Sao, C.C., Gargani, J., Tudryn, A. and Calligaro, T., 2016. Anthropic activities in the fossiliferous Quranwala Zone, 2.6 Ma, Siwaliks of Northwest India, historical context of the discovery and scientific investigations. Comptes Rendus Palevol, 15(3-4), pp.295-316. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292077679_Anthropic_activities_in_the_fossiliferous_Quranwala_Zone_26Ma_Siwaliks_of_Northwest_India_historical_context_of_the_discovery_and_scientific_investigations https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anne_Dambricourt_Malasse Gargani, J., Abdessadok, S., Tudryn, A., Sao, C.C., Malassé, A.D., Gaillard, C., Moigne, A.M., Singh, M., Bhardwaj, V. and Karir, B., 2016. Geology and geomorphology of Masol paleonto-archeological site, Late Pliocene, Chandigarh, Siwalik Frontal Range, NW India. Comptes Rendus Palevol, 15(3-4), pp.379-391. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281291986_Geology_and_Geomorphology_of_Masol_paleonto-archeological_site_Late_Pliocene_Chandigarh_Siwalik_Frontal_Range_NW_India https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anne_Dambricourt_Malasse Gaillard, C., Singh, M., Malassé, A.D., Bhardwaj, V., Karir, B., Kaur, A., Pal, S., Moigne, A.M., Sao, C.C., Abdessadok, S. and Gargani, J., 2016. The lithic industries on the fossiliferous outcrops of the Late Pliocene masol formation, Siwalik frontal range, northwestern India (Punjab). Comptes Rendus Palevol, 15(3-4), pp.341-357. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/293332452_The_lithic_industries_on_the_fossiliferous_outcrops_of_the_Late_Pliocene_Masol_Formation_Siwalik_Frontal_Range_north-western_India_Punjab https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claire_Gaillard2 Yours, Paul H.
  14. Shark Tooth help please

    New Member here, just getting into fossil hunting that I had a few chances to do as a child (45 now with a child who also loves fossil hunting). We found this tooth yesterday and I'm not sure on it. Perhaps a baby Megalodon? Seems shaped right, and a tall root....Unless its a tooth of an adult shark I just don't recognize....Thanks for any help. I have been reeding the forum a little while now, and decided post some now that we are getting out hunting!
  15. Hello, I in no way know a lot about fossils so I’m not sure if this is authentic or not. I purchased it from a local crystal shop. Super cheap and they had a lot of other Megalodon teeth to choose from. Anyway would appreciate some input. Thanks
  16. ? Barracuda teeth

    Hi friends i went this week to my new fossil hunting site and i found many fish teeth this is one of them , it is 4 mm long , 2 mm wide at the root , sharp ,smooth edges . could it be Barracuda teeth . The area is Pliocene , umm Er Raduma formation .
  17. Can anyone help I'd this partial gastropod? Found it in the pliocene Yorktown Formation. It appears to have been pretty big in life. Thanks!
  18. Florida shell - Pliocene

    Hi guys, I can't classify this specimen. Do you have an idea? Provenance Pliocene of Florida. Thank you!! Paolo
  19. unid. leaf

    From the album Plants

    unid. leaf Pliocene Willershausen am Harz Lower Saxony Germany Length 3cm
  20. Mio/Plio unknown

    There is a spot relatively close to me that is a late Miocene/ early Pliocene deposit. Consisting mainly of Great White teeth, marine mammal chunks, with occational (but rare) Meg. tooth pieces. Being a secondary deposit, everything in it got beat up and water worn pretty good. I was going through a box of bone pieces and grabbed this out for I'D. I was thinking inner ear bone? What are your views on this?
  21. Again in an own thread because I couldn´t add tags to old thread New print from the same source as this https://3d.si.edu/model/fullscreen/p1b-1474716020541-1478115462584-0 Odobenocetops! I planned to reconstruct all missing parts but stoped after the tusks because anything postcranial would become even more speculative than the missing skullparts. I´ll leave it as a fossil replica rather than a recontruction. Painting will follow.
  22. Anyone good at Mio-Plio bird ID?

    Hafa adai everyone, greetings from Guam! Been sortin' through the collection and came across my Lee Creek bird finds. I have about a half-dozen bird vertebra. Does anyone know anyone who might be able to ID? I also have a large-ish bird vert from Calvert Cliffs. Thanks in advance!
  23. Hello again TTF! This will be my second post about my finds from my first trip to the peace river! This post is dedicated to one of my favourite finds and one of my favourite animals, the mammoth! During my trip to the peace river, I found many beautiful fossils myself, but I seemed to have had the best luck searching through other people's garbage. The location where I went to collect in was already visited many times by other people. Everything unwanted that turns up in their shifters is usually thrown to the banks, creating garbage piles. One particularly productive garbage pile produced many of my favourite Dugong ribs, my only meg (more on that later) and a mammoth tooth! How someone could look at these things and throw them away is beyond me. Unfortunately, the tooth was already fragmented when I found it. I believe that all the fragments came from the same tooth, though, because some fit together perfectly! I also have a question about this tooth. Is it possible to identify the species of mammoth from the tooth, either from its features or by looking at the known species of mammoth present in Florida? Thanks!
  24. King of the Dugong

    Happy March break TTF! I hope you all had a fantastic holiday! I have just gotten back from a fantastic trip to Florida. Thanks to TTF, I was lucky to discover the peace river. This discovery caused an entire re-write of my family's vacation plans. My father, who was also looking forward to walking through a swamp, agreed to join me on an expedition there. This was my first fossil hunting trip in Florida. I would also like to give my thanks and free advertising to Fossil Funatics, the tour operator who organized the hunt and provided the resources for us. We had a very successful two days. The guy is truly helpful, knowledgable, and fun to be around. He kindly gave all of his Dugong ribs and some of his shark teeth to me. We actually went to a stream which feeds into the actual peace river. As soon as we arrived there, I found myself overtaken by a sudden obsession with Dugong bones, earning my the titular nickname given to me by my dad. Since I have literally hundreds fossils from the river, this post will be dedicated to the Dugong bones. More posts on this are to follow! Enjoy!
  25. Some South Carolina Things

    Here are three little objects from the Pliocene/Miocene/Pleistocene of South Carolina. Most of the fossils I found here were from the Pliocene Goose Creek Limestone, but I also have some horse teeth that are most likely Pleistocene. This is a beach site. The cube is 1cm^3
×