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Found 337 results

  1. Decided to spend a couple minutes searching some of my favourite spots alone Big Bay beach in Cape Town and came away with some megalodon teeth fragments,a mako and a whale eardrum. If anyone wants clearer pictures or wants to see some of my other finds from searching this months feel free to pm. regards Pamar.
  2. Portland Fossils ID

    G'day everyone! I have going through some of my Portland finds and had a few pieces I needed some help with. The first piece is what I suspect is a drumfish tooth, which I am fairly confident with but wanted a second opinion and the second piece is what I believe to be some sort of fish or shark dermal plate? I am not quite sure and this is the piece I need the most help with. The site is aged late Miocene? to early Pliocene and is a marine environment where many shark, cetacean, fish and invertebrate fossils can be found. Thanks, Dan 1. Drumfish tooth? 2. Unknown (Possible dermal plate?)
  3. Best Shark Tooth Finds of 2018!

    Hey TFF members! So big news, I hit 1,000 subscribers on YouTube which was a big goal for me, so I'm happy to have made it! Thanks to everyone who has checked out my videos, it really does mean a lot. I put together a video of some of my favorite shark tooth hunting moments since I started making videos about 6 months ago. This one is full of action, I promise! Give it a watch if you are interested and have some time
  4. Hi everyone, My last hunt of 2018 was incredible. And quite surprising too! For Xmas, we went to Middelburg in Zeeland to visit my mother's family, which is always a huge load of fun for me because I get to hang out with all my cousins, that I don't see very often. Anyways, one of the days, they all wanted to do a big walk on one of the beaches. At first they wanted to go to Dishoek, but I managed to convince them to go to the Banjaard instead. Once arrived, we split into 2 groups: one was my mother, my eldest cousin (18), my 2nd-youngest cousin (6), and I. All the rest went to the other group. The other group just walked, but our little group did something much more interesting... You guessed it: fossil hunting! As soon as we got onto the beach, we almost immediately found our first fish vertebra, but after that we seemed to have hit a small dry spell for nothing really worthy was being found. A few common fossil bivalves here and there, but nothing more. For my two cousins, it was their first time fossil hunting, and we had to give them a few examples to show them what to look for. I told them to focus on the fish vertebrae, because these were the easiest to recognize. The smaller one also did a lot of shell-hunting on her own, always picking up the most colorful ones and saying this one was Mama shell, this one Papa shell, this one Sister, etc until she made one giant family of orange shells Then after about an hour or two of hunting with rather little success, we finally hit these little shell banks on the beach. And there, BINGO! Gastropod after gastropod, we couldn't stop finding an incredible amount of them. On the Dutch shores, fossil (and modern too) gastropods are generally much less common than fossil bivalves. So the amount we found here was very surprising!
  5. Good day all! Spent a couple hours down at the beach (Milnerton,Cape Town) yesterday - unfortunately it was a bit of a quite day. Only came across one tooth and some interesting bones I wasn’t able to identify.
  6. Onslow Beach Bone Fragment

    Good afternoon, my husband found this bone fragment (?) while walking Onslow Beach in Jacksonville, NC. Can anyone identify if it is indeed bone and what it could possibly be from? Thank you very much.
  7. Onslow Beach Find

    Good afternoon, I was walking Onslow Beach this past weekend and found lots of great stuff. This one item just stumps me- can anyone help identify the item. It is approximately 3.5 cm x 3.5 cm. Thank you in advance.
  8. Good day to everyone! Thought I’d share some the teeth found on Milnerton and Big Bay beach here in South Africa. Any help identifying would be appreciated - I’m still relatively new so the more worn and broken teeth have me clueless. More pictures to follow!
  9. Why are t-rex teeth so expensive compared to carcharodontosaurus teeth, are they alot rarer?
  10. Hey TFF members! Cris and I got out to explore a brand new site for us recently, and it did not disappoint. This was a scouting trip so we didn't find as much as usual, but we will definitely be going back soon now that we had a chance to figure out the site a bit. This video is pretty eventful, from me wearinf a duck mask and playing a banjo, to Cris buying me a gift, to finding some really cool fossils in an interesting location! Give the video a watch if you're interested and have some time!
  11. Several Tamiami Formation inverts

    Hi Gang, looking for some insight on several Tamiami formation Pliocene aged Sarasota County, Florida inverts. Found this gastropod at work a couple weeks ago as the rains exposed some new material in the road fill. Trying to confirm if its a Phyllonotus globosus. It also had a neat little Chama inside...saving it for my Chama ID project that I may get to some day....
  12. As the year comes to a close i decided to do a bit more collecting at one of my favourite Australian sites: Beaumaris near Melbourne in Victoria, Australia. Once again i travelled down and stayed at a motel near the beach for three days (27/12/18 through to 29/12/18). This trip is a sequel to the previous two trips i have made here which are also posted on the forum: Jan 2016 trip: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/61248-fossil-hunting-holiday-in-victoria-australia-dec-2015-jan-2016/ Feb 2017 trip: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/71996-fossil-hunting-holiday-at-beaumaris-australia-feb-2017/ Beaumaris is a significant site with both marine and terrestrial fossils from the latest Miocene aged Beaumaris Sandstone Formation (5 - 6 million years old), which crops out in distinctly red-coloured coastal cliffs and also in offshore rocky reefs. An impressive diversity of both vertebrate and invertebrate fauna occurs here, and the Melbourne Museum has put together a neat PDF of the fossil diversity for those unfamiliar with the site (https://www.bcs.asn.au/fossils_of_beaumaris_2015-02.pdf). My plan was to collect every single low tide across these three days, and sleep during every high tide. Yes, this meant going out collecting in the middle of the night too! My main interest was to collect shark teeth, however they can be tough to find here and are certainly not as common as at many other sites internationally that the people on this forum would be more familiar with. This often seems to be the case with Australian vertebrate fossils. It does however make it quite rewarding when you do eventually find them! The first day of searching (27/12/18) proved to be rather disappointing. I finally got to try snorkelling for fossils, which is a popular method here for finding things exposed along the seabed, but alas after about 3 hours in the water i had not found any bones or teeth. I was unable to locate the nodule bed where most of the vertebrate fossils originate from, which i think played a part in my lack of success. The seabed was also quite sanded over and it was hard to see much. I was definitely out of my element here, but it was also a lot of fun to get close to some of the local marine life, including stingrays! I decided to return to land collecting after not doing very well in the water and when i did so my luck changed greatly. The next two days and nights of land collecting (28/12/18 and 29/12/18) proved to be much more successful and i even got to meet two TFF members on the beach (coincidentally)! @Echinoid and @Tympanic bulla were also out looking, and we had a nice chat before they headed off to continue snorkelling. I then spent most of my remaining time on the beach flipping rocks and examining the pebbles up close, ultimately finishing the trip with a total of five shark teeth which i was very happy with! Carcharodon hastalis tooth as found. 24mm long. Large Carcharodon hastalis upper anterior tooth, as found at 2 am (with a head-torch) on 29/12/18. Measures 56 mm long. I had long been waiting for a tooth of this size! Carcharodon hastalis posterior tooth as found. 15 mm long. Another Carcharodon hastalis posterior as found. 13 mm long. And a small fragment of cetacean bone. Worn pieces like this are the most common vertebrate fossils at Beaumaris. Pictures continued in the next post
  13. First report of prehistoric peccaries from Gray Fossil Site WJHL, News Channel 11 Staff December 20, 2018 https://www.wjhl.com/local/first-report-of-prehistoric-peccaries-from-gray-fossil-site/1669081173 East Tennessee scientists ID extinct peccary species East Tennessee State University scientists have discovered the remains of two different extinct species of ancient peccaries at the Gray Fossil Site. WRCBtv http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/39690109/east-tennessee-scientists-id-extinct-peccary-species The paper is: Doughty, E.M., Wallace, S.C., Schubert, B.W. and Lyon, L.M., 2018. First occurrence of the enigmatic peccaries Mylohyus elmorei and Prosthennops serus from the Appalachians: latest Hemphillian to Early Blancan of Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee. PeerJ, 6, p.e5926. https://peerj.com/articles/5926/ Another paper is; Samuels, J.X., Bredehoeft, K.E. and Wallace, S.C., 2018. A new species of Gulo from the Early Pliocene Gray Fossil Site (Eastern United States); rethinking the evolution of wolverines. PeerJ, 6, p.e4648. https://peerj.com/articles/4648/ An older article is: Digging up bones: Unearthing the past at Gray Fossil Site Diane Hughes, Explore Tennessee Sept. 10, 2018 https://www.tennessean.com/story/exploretennessee/2018/09/10/unearthing-past-gray-fossil-site/1215351002/ Merry Christmas Everyone, Paul H.
  14. Coral or shell?

    I bought a "little" package of Lee Creek matrix from @PaleoRon recently. It came in yesterday & I started digging. Lots of teeth & vertebrae so far & I'm barely into it. I found this one thing I'm not sure what it is, but it looks cool. 11 mm in length x 6 mm wide & stuck to a rock. Pics are at 55x magnification showing top, both ends (sort of) & both sides (sort of). Wasn't easy to get some of the pics, but here they are. Not sure if its a coral or shell or just some ordinary oddity.
  15. Divalinga quadrisulcata

    A very uncommon find for this site, possibly due to it's small size. Found in matrix from the inside of a large clam shell. PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWN AND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIA Lyle D. Campbell 1993
  16. Megalodon may have been killed off by Supernova radiation, Hannah Osborne, Newsweek, December 13, 2018 https://www.newsweek.com/megalodon-extinct-shark-supernova-cosmic-ray-cancer-mutations-1256980 Massive supernova explosion may have wiped out giant prehistoric sharks, scientists say. Megalodon may have been among creatures driven to extinction after cosmic particles drove up cancer rates, new study claims The Independent, Josh Gabbatiss, December 2018 https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/supernova-stars-explosion-giant-sharks-prehistoric-megalodon-extinction-science-a8679636.html The paper is: Adrian L. Melott, Franciole Marinho, and Laura Paulucci 2018, Hypothesis: Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the End-Pliocene Supernova. Astrobiology, Published Online, November 27, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1089/ast.2018.1902 and at Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the end-Pliocene Supernova Adrian L. Melott (Kansas), Franciole Marinho, Laura Paulucci (Submitted on 26 Dec 2017 (v1), last revised 17 Oct 2018 (this version, v2)) https://arxiv.org/pdf/1712.09367.pdf https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09367 Yours, Paul H.
  17. Happy holidays everyone. I would greatly appreciate help identifying the following specimen. It was collected in the Santa Susana Mountains of Simi Valley, Ventura County, California. It came from the Saugus or Pico Formation. Saugus is late Pleistocene to late Pliocene while Pico is middle Pleistocene to Pliocene. My uncertainty regarding the exact formation arises from the fact that (1) it was float material already weathered out of the formation it came from and (2) based on limited research and knowledge, I believe there has been a lack of consenus regarding differentiation of the two formations (see recent work by Richard Squires et al. in Valencia and R. Squires in Newhall). I assume it is marine since all of Pico is marine and Saugus is non-marine to marine. At first I thought it was a shark tooth when I picked it up but I threw that thought out the window when I realized it had three serrated edges. Measures 22 millimeters long and 6.5 millimeters wide. It is 4 millimeters tall on one end and 9.5 millimeters tall on he end that has the needle structure. There are three to four 'bumps' on both long sides on the end with the needle. The bumps look evenly spaced. I can and will do my best to provide additional info if needed.
  18. New papers recording new occurrences of fossil Monodontidae are available online: Hiroto Ichishima; Hitoshi Furusawa; Makino Tachibana; Masaichi Kimura (2018). First monodontid cetacean (Odontoceti, Delphinoidea) from the early Pliocene of the north‐western Pacific Ocean. Papers in Palaeontology. Online edition. doi:10.1002/spp2.1244. (describes Haborodelphis japonicus) Pesci et al. (2018). First record of Monodontidae (Cetacea, Odontoceti) in the Mediterranean Basin from the Pliocene sands of Arcille (Grosseto, Tuscany, Italy). Fossilia, Volume 2018: 37-39. Denebola and Bohaskaia were long the only described fossil monodontid species from the pre-Pleistocene, but Haborodelphis and the new monodontid skull from Tuscany shed new light on the distribution of monodontids.
  19. Shark Tooth Color

    Shark teeth that change color.. Here is one... a Mako. A Photo taken within 10 minutes of removing from a heavy blanket of mud, gravel, clay mixture. This tooth had not seen daylight in a couple of million years. Then a photo of the same tooth 2 hours later when I arrived home. Yes I applied water, then oil and neither the blade or especially the root darkens again.. If some type of organism that dies/fade in sun light, how about this hemi that came from the exact same location. Why is the root still black? Figure this will be a good discussion for shark experts.
  20. Myctophum sp.

    From the album Vertebrates

    Myctophum sp. Late Pliocene Vrica Italy
  21. Nov2018 Fossil Club Coral

    As the title says, I went to a local fossil club meeting last night. I always purchase tickets for the fossil lottery and selected these when my tickets were called early. Looking for an ID.... @MikeR What is the "frosting"..... Also kudos for a good presentation on Cretaceous Inland sea.. I learned from Joshua about identifying the shifting shoreline boundaries of the WIS by testing/core samples of current rocks, using the types of rock and imbedded fossils to identify the shoreline. There are always questions on TFF about finding fossils... Turns out Joshua has a really accurate map.
  22. Carmines Island/York River Va

    Hello all, I am going on a trip with the family down to Carmine's Island for recreation but figured while I'm there why not do some fossil hunting. I mean, it just makes the day better anytime. We know of a location called Felgates Creek, which is Pliocene. Good? Bad? Only about 29 minutes away from me. Can we just find stuff on the coastal beaches? Thanks
  23. This is interesting. Scientists Spot What May Be a Giant Impact Crater Hidden Under Greenland Ice By Meghan Bartels, Space.com, November 14, 2018 https://www.space.com/42431-giant-impact-crater-hidden-under-greenland-ice.html The open access paper is: Kurt H. Kjær, Nicolaj K. Larsen, Tobias Binder, and many others A large impact crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland. Science Advances 14 Nov 2018:Vol. 4, no. 11, eaar8173 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar8173 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/11/eaar8173 Yours, Paul H.
  24. I don't read a lot about hominid fossils but I try to keep up with general knowledge of recent finds and discussions. Sometimes, the various science magazines will publish a special issue on the subject and I try to pick up a copy. The September issue of Natural History is devoted to human origins with a few articles with even one on the ancient primates of the Paleocene and Eocene along with a reprinted column by the late Stephen J. Gould. I haven't read it yet but leafed through it (nice artwork and fossil photos in it). I had seen it that month at a local Barnes & Noble but the last copy was all bent-up like an accordion. I looked for it at another store but couldn't find it. I went back to pick up the beat-up one I had seen but it was gone. After hunting around the magazine website, I found that back issues were available so I mailed away for it ($7 including shipping). Ten days later, it arrived. In case anyone else is interested, here's the link to page with the back issue address - just scroll down to it: http://www.naturalhistorymag.com/contact.html
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