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Found 264 results

  1. Last week I was on holiday in the Netherlands/Belgium and I found many things! I mainly hunted at the beaches near Cadzand but I was also in the area of Antwerp. There the quality of the shark teeth is much better and you can find more and rarer ones At the sand pit the Miocene, Pliocene sand was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock and as you can see the area is very overgrown. You can still find there many shark teeth, bones and bivalves. I mainly concentrated on finding shark teeth. The best method to find something there is to dig a bit and then sieve the material. Here is a picture of the site: The total haul: The better ones: This was one of the best finds: Its about 5 cm long and I think that its an Isurus Hastalis (please correct me if I am wrong ) I like the colors on this one: (3.5 cm) A sweet little Galeocerdo Aduncus tooth: (1.2 cm) And last but not least this was probably my rarest find there: Small but nice Its an upper tooth of Somniosus microcephalus. I already have a lower tooth but thats the first upper for me! I am very happy with it Thanks for watching and I hope you enjoyed my little hunting trip! Of course any ID help is welcome!
  2. Pyrazisinus sulcatus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Potamididae Pyrazisinus sulcatus (Heilprin, 1886) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande Pit, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Compare to a complete specimen from the Caloosahatchee Formation LINK.
  3. Strombus cf. pugilis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Strombidae Strombus cf. pugilis (Linnaeus, 1758) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande Pit, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extant? Notes: Most similar to the extant Caribbean Fighting Conch.
  4. Calliostoma euconulum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Trocida Family Calliostomidae Calliostoma euconulum Olsson & Harbinson, 1953 Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande Pit, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Reference Olsson, A.A., and A. Harbison. 1953 (1990 Reprint). Pliocene Mollusca of Southern Florida with Special Reference to Those from North Saint Petersburg, with special chapters on Turridae by W.G. Fargo and Vitinellidae and Fresh-water Mollusks by H.A. Pilsbry, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Monographs 8, The Shell Museum and Educational Foundation, 457 pages, 65 plates
  5. Calliostoma cf. pulchrum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Trocida Family Calliostomidae Calliostoma cf. pulchrum (C.B. Adams, 1850) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: FDOT road metal, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extant? The closest species of this specimen is the extant C. pulchrum.
  6. Calliostoma jujuconulum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Trocida Family Calliostomidae Calliostoma jujuconulum Olsson & Harbinson, 1953 Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: FDOT road metal, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Reference Olsson, A.A., and A. Harbison. 1953 (1990 Reprint). Pliocene Mollusca of Southern Florida with Special Reference to Those from North Saint Petersburg, with special chapters on Turridae by W.G. Fargo and Vitinellidae and Fresh-water Mollusks by H.A. Pilsbry, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Monographs 8, The Shell Museum and Educational Foundation, 457 pages, 65 plates
  7. Calliostoma willcoxianum

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Trocida Family Calliostomidae Calliostoma willcoxianum Dall, 1892 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Incorrectly identified earlier in gallery as C. mitchelli pontoni. Reference Olsson, A.A., and A. Harbison. 1953 (1990 Reprint). Pliocene Mollusca of Southern Florida with Special Reference to Those from North Saint Petersburg, with special chapters on Turridae by W.G. Fargo and Vitinellidae and Fresh-water Mollusks by H.A. Pilsbry, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Monographs 8, The Shell Museum and Educational Foundation, 457 pages, 65 plates
  8. Calliostoma mitchelli philanthropus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Trocida Family Calliostomidae Calliostoma mitchelli philanthropus (Conrad, 1834) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: This top shell displays quite a bit of variation. Conrad (1834) described both C. mithchelli and C. philanthropus. Later authors such as Dall (1892) and Mansfield (1930) placed several subspecies within C. philanthropus. Of 30 Calliostoma species/subspecies from the Upper Pliocene, Campbell (1993) recognized 19. Two stocks were dominate C. virginicum and C. mitchelli which took page precedence over C. philanthropus and which former subspecies are now named.
  9. Surprise!

    I've just found this big bivalve in pliocene level from south of France.
  10. Forgive me if I am posting in the wrong section. But I have been to Green Mill Run once last year, and am looking to go this week. I am on vacation in North Carolina but a couple hours away. There has been quite a bit of rain which I know can make Green Mill Run unavailable to Fossil hunting. I could not find a way to determine what the water level might be like, and I don't know how fast the creek empties from water after rains. By any chance if anyone that lives in the area familiar with this location could give me a heads up if it's worth my drive there to Fossil hunt with my nine-year-old son and family that would be awesome. If not we might just make the drive and peek into the creek, but if it's not available we would rather go to the Natural History Museum in Raleigh I guess. Thank you very much for anyone that could help, I know it's short notice but if we get there I will certainly post a report!
  11. I haven’t been keeping any Ecphoras that I find because I have all I want but this one looked like it could be pretty big. Turned out not to be very big but big enough to be interesting. It was found in a river outcrop with a little bit exposed. Normally small ones can be easily cleaned with a toothbrush and soapy water but bigger ones tend to have cracks. This one had plenty of cracks and rotten spots that made it fragile. It had to be preserved with vinac. Here are some pics during prep.
  12. Small bonus

    Recently I acquired a specimen of Jianghanichthys hubeiensis from @RJB (big thank you, I'm really happy with the Jianghanichthys!). I was examining the fish, but I then noticed there was a small portion of organic material exposed on the back of the matrix. I started prepping, curious to see what was there. I ended up with a small fish. The fish is only a bit over an inch in length. So far I've only seen one dorsal and one ventral fin (one of these fins were flaked off during preparation.....oops) My image shows an illustration of where the missing fin was placed. If anybody knows the ID of these fish, I would be eager to know. Specimen is from Songze, Hubei, China.
  13. Heterodontus cainozoicus

    Port Jackson Shark crushing tooth collected from Beaumaris, Victoria. The first I have ever collected.
  14. G'day all, Today I decided to go down for a hunt at Beaumaris with my dad and make good use of the low tide. For those who don't know, the fossils from Beaumaris come from the Beaumaris Sandstone Formation, aged 6.5-4.5 million years ago (late Miocene to early Pliocene) and around 30 minutes from Melbourne. To find the fossils we searched through the shingle on the beach that had been washed up from a phosphatic nodule bed which can only be partially accessed at low tide and is where most of the vertebrate material derives from. Fossils from this site include: Shark and ray teeth, fish jaws and teeth, ceteacen bones and teeth, bird bones, seal bones, terrestrial mammal bones, rare turtle shell, corals, bivalves, gastropods, nautiloids, crustaceans, brachiopods and echinoids. Despite the water being very cold (And falling into the water on my way out of the site) We found many good fossils today, many of them firsts. The Site Tusk Shells (Laevidentalium) Sea Urchins (Lovenia Woodsi) Port Jackson Shark teeth (Heterodontus cainozoicus) Toadfish crushing tooth plates (Diodon) Shark tooth (Shortfin Mako?) Assorted bone fragments (Most likely Cetacean)
  15. Hi There, I have a few collecting vices (?) but bottles and bivalves are sadly not on that list. Up for grabs is a GPR bottle, which has lost some of its purple color and was made in a mold. Soon after the turn of the century 1920's - ish ? No breaks. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. I didn't say that I haven't owned several bottles in the past har har ... The bivalve is something I'm assuming is fairly common and possibly still an extant species but it is both halves. I see these occasionally so if you want more just give me a PM and I'll keep an eye out. Both of these were found either in the Savannah river mud or washing out from dredged material. Pliocene - Pleistocene Nothing in return just a wave and a smile. Cheers, Brett
  16. Oldest pygmy whale fossil identified 60 years after being collected from Beaumaris, Victoria. The ear bone is believed to be 6 million years old and is one of only six pygmy right whale fossils in the world. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-11/pygmy-right-whale-fossil-found-in-museums-victoria-collection/9978612
  17. Made a trip to a Pliocene site on an eastern North Carolina River on the 4th. What a great trip it was. Found some extraordinary stuff. These 3 items made my day. First a large tiger, Galeocerdo cuvier 1.20 inch (30.6 mm) wide and on the slant. Then this 2.61 inch (66.3 mm) Carcharodon hastalis But the crown jewel of the day a 2.03 inch (51.6 mm) long by 1.82 inch (46 mm) wide Hemipristis serra. The largest I have ever personally seen. It is wider than my next largest one.
  18. Northern California Bone

    This Miocene/Pliocene bone was probably collected near the coast north of San Francisco in Marin or Sonoma Counties. Is this a whale bone? What part? Is the long narrow bone on top in the proper place relative to the other larger bones or is it unrelated? The length of the bone is 7.5 inches. Note that under the top bone, the 1 or 2 bones appear to have their bumpy and darker non cancellous surfaces exposed. @Boesse Thanks, John
  19. Small rodent humerus ? Savannah, Georgia

    Hello, I have what I think is a small humerus from a rodent of some kind ? This is dredge material so it can range from Pliocene to Pleistocene. Was curious if it was possible to determine the type of rodent. I'm assuming it's too small for a capybara type of animal. @MarcoSr does this resemble anything you have seen ? Cheers, Brett
  20. I already posted this hunting trip at the Zandmotor on my last vacation: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/85026-a-beautiful-day-at-the-zandmotor/ I also visited some other locations like a sand pit near Antwerp (Belgium). This was my fourth visit there and probably the most successful until now The Miocene, Pliocene sand was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock and as you can see the area is very overgrown. You can still find there many shark teeth, bones and bivalves. I mainly concentrated on finding shark teeth. Here is picture of the location: This is a picture of my last visit there last year, because my pictures from this visit are all too blurred But the situation didnt change much. I think that the best method to find something there is to dig a bit and sieve the material. Too bad that I destroyed my sieve more or at the beginnig of the day: After that I had to search on the surface but nevertheless I managed to find some cool teeth This was the find of the day: Could this be a tooth of Isurus Hastalis? I am not sure.... Its about 4.6 cm long I was super happy that I could find such a beautiful and big tooth !! Here is my total haul: And here are some more of the better finds: A 4 cm long Isurus Oxynchus:
  21. And another Antwerp bivalve: Veneridae?

    Hi all, Slightly incomplete, but I think that this shell is from the Veneroidea order, and possibly the Veneridae. I would like to narrow that down a little more though, hopefully to species. Is Callista chione perhaps a possibility? It's from Antwerp, Belgium. "Scaldisian" of the Pliocene (3 myo), Kattendijk Formatie (?). Thanks in advance, Max
  22. Antwerp Pycnodonte?

    Hi all, Found this shell in the Antwerp harbor. From the "Scaldisian" of the Pliocene, about 3 myo. I think Kattendijk Formation (can anyone confirm this?). I think it's some kind of shell within the Pycnodonte genus maybe? If so, which one? I am pretty sure that it's from the Ostreidae. Thanks in advance, Max
  23. Fossil bivalves with periostracum???

    Hi all, Found these two shells in Antwerp, Belgium. It was in a place with lots of sand, and the sea was rather far away. There are tons of Pliocene shells there to be found. I also found these two bivalves. What I find really weird is that the periostracum (the brown layer) is still preserved!? How could that be? Nearly all fossil shells lose it when fossilizing, yet these two seem to have kept it. What do you think is the answer to this mystery? Fossils, with the periostracum preserved, or modern (but how did they get here?)? (Or maybe this isn't a periostracum at all. But what is it then?) I think that the species are Mytilus edulis and Spisula subtruncata (although that's by far the biggest Spisula I have ever seen) (both present modern in the North Sea, and occur as fossils in Belgium). I'm greatly anticipating your thoughts on this! Max
  24. Small Antwerp bivalve

    Hi all, Found this small bivalve in Antwerp, Belgium. Most likely from the Pliocene. That hinge is weird, with that thing sticking out (almost like the Mya shells!). Anyone know what species this is? Thanks in advance! Max
  25. By any chance does anyone recognize these little orb/circular structures/features in some of the damaged Vermicularia tubes in these shots? Not sure if they might be simply immature bivalves or something else? I pried out a few of them and I'm no wiser as they are so small and I dont see any real features/markings under magnification... The two that I pried out are approx .5mm wide but the others still in the tubes are a bit bigger. The 2nd and third frames in the 2nd photo makes them look like something that could be a small echinoid with star shaped markings but that might be deceiving. they actually look more like absolutely smooth micro PVC endcaps, not spheres/orbs. In my other recent Garage finds thread Adam had a good question about operculums and I dont even know if they had one or not...So if you all have any insight I'd love to hear/know.. Thanks for the help. Regards, Chris
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