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Found 369 results

  1. Pliocene bone from Florida

    I have found a lot of fossils at a land site in Southwest Florida recently and have been trying to ID them all. After finding a section of gomphothere and rhino tooth I think they are all from the early pliocene. This bone has been driving me crazy though. Its 2 inches long and an inch wide, and any help would really be appreciated.
  2. Clacton find

    Hi, this is a find from high up the beach in the dry sand found 50m east from Clacton pier, I dont think its bone or ivory, it was in two pieces when found so I stuck them together, a lot of material from the Pleistocene and before found in this location due to the beach recharge, Bison horn?, any help with a possible ID would be great, many thanks.
  3. Caspersen Beach Fossils

    Hey there, A friend of mine recently came back from Caspersen Beach in Florida with a handful of shark teeth and random chunks of bone found along the beach. Having never been to the area myself, it’s my understanding that fossils wash ashore that are Miocene and Pliocene in age. I was able to ID a number of her finds, but there are these two similar looking chunks that I’m hung up on. They almost look like worn horse teeth. Can anyone ID these beyond the chunks that they are? Thanks as always!
  4. Unknown for me from Calvert Maryland

    Can someone possibly clue me in on what this tiny bone is? It looks like it has a tooth attached or something of the likes...thanks in advance
  5. Theoretical question

    Okay, say you are in a special area and in that area there are numerous fossils. The local museum and collectors have numerous specimens in their collections but you are visiting and find something awesome! You contact the local museum, let them know you had found something and let the property owner know. You allow the museum to know you are more than willing to help if they will allow you to assist them in their retrieval efforts. What is the likelihood they will contact the finder, and what is the likelihood they will allow you to help? They do need volunteers ...
  6. Fossil whale bone (specific bone ID)

    Hello all, So i've recently come into the possession of this chunk of bone, and based on the size, porosity, and locality (York River State Park) I believe it's a whale bone (Miocene-Pleistocene in age, likely a mysticete). My question is, which bone exactly is it? It seems to have some fairly distinctive features that seem to lend towards identification, but after around two days of research i'm stumped. I'm thinking it could be anything but some vertebral element, but i'm not sure. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  7. Biological or geological?

    This object came with the whale bone I posted about recently. I'm not sure if it's biological or geological so I figured I'd throw it into the room & see what happens. 8.5 cm long x 4.5 cm wide x 8 mm thick (roughly). Flat with a slight curve. This was the shape when found. I sanded the broken part for better internal views. Pics labeled 4, 5 & 6 are closeups. 4 being the break running from side to side, 5 being the break running lengthwise & 6 a closeup of the outside surface.
  8. Unknown Impression?

    Im really not sure what this could be. It was found yesterday in 2 million year old fransician muds at Centerville. Im thinking some sort of plant impression. Or maybe a fragmentary piece of sand dollar which are known from this locality aswell.
  9. Some of my best fossils from antwerp

    These are some of my best and biggest teeth from antwerp Show me yours
  10. C. megalodon

    So, I can't get myself to spend the kind of money necessary for a complete, large, megalodon tooth. I'd rather spend that kind of money on other fossils in the rare instance that I actually purchase fossils. I have found some beautiful, complete megs personally, but none bigger than a couple inches. There is a store that I discovered down in Indiana that I call the "Wiccan Store" that has all kinds of beads, incense, crystals, and odd ball assemblages of things. I went into it years ago just to see what was in there and discovered that, way in the back, they have a little room devoted to rocks, fossils, and minerals. They used to have a big bin of broken megs averaging about $8 each for the big ones (now all they have are tiny ones in comparison). At any rate, I bought a huge broken tooth - 6-inches (15 cm) - for $8. I want to put a monster tooth on display. But I want the full effect of size that a complete one offers. So here was my solution (as usual, I forgot to take a true "before" photo, but the photos I did take, early, are sufficient). Here is how it started - the broken tooth with the beginning of the build-up of palaeosculp. I add no more than about an inch at a time and then let it set-up before adding more. It gets too difficult to form when in large globs. The basic form is complete and I'm beginning to add texture here. Here is the mostly complete restoration. It was not my intent to restore it like it just fell out of the mouth of the shark, but rather restore it to how it likely looked in the geologic context prior to breaking in half. Painting is by far the most difficult step. Matching any one color on the tooth takes as many as 5 or so separate colors and careful mixing to match. It's not perfect, and I may still work a bit on the texture of the root in spots, but I'm reasonably happy with it. I showed it around and no one noticed it was restored until I told them, so that's good enough for me for display purposes. Apologies to the sharktooth experts if there are any morphological gaffs. @Nimravis @Darktooth @Tidgy's Dad @Bobby Rico @Cowboy Paleontologist
  11. Teeth found on a beach

    Hello, A few years ago me and my daughter found this tooth on the beach in the Netherlands. Since then we started to go regularly to several beaches to find washed off treasures. I though one of them was a horse tooth from the pleistocene...now i am not sure..it's too compact and short..i would love to have your expertise on it
  12. Globidens alabamaensis?

    While collecting at a location in SE Virginia which produces a mixture of material from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation and late Miocene/early Pliocene Yorktown Formation, I was shocked to find what I believe to be a cretaceous Globidens sp. anterior tooth fragment. My only explanation for this would be that it must have been redeposited into the Eocene beds and finally exposed with rest of the material. The texture is classic Globidens. The only other species with a slightly similar texture found within these formations (though still markedly different), would be Squalodon sp., however if the tooth were more complete it would clearly prove to be hollow with a conical interior consistent with squamates like mosasaurs. The fragment is approximately 7/8" x 1/2". This is the first bit of possibly cretaceous material I have found from these exposures, so it would be quite interesting if the general consensus is a Globidens sp. Your thoughts would be much appreciated! Thanks, Ash
  13. Hey all! This week my colleagues and I published a paper we spent most of the last decade sweating over. It is an exhaustive report of all known late Miocene-Pleistocene records of teeth of Otodus (aka Carcharocles) megalodon teeth from the west coast in an attempt to estimate the date at which O megalodon went extinct. Aside from some conspiracy theorists who will wait until they die and not see a live 'meg', we all know it's not living today as there is not a shred of positive evidence indicating its existence. We know it's around in the Miocene, and the early Pliocene. Did it survive into the Pleistocene? End of the Pliocene? or become extinct sometime earlier? These questions require serious thought because it has direct implications for whether or not O. megalodon went extinct at the same time as a bunch of weird marine mammals or if it was killed off by a supernova known to have occurred 2.6 Ma. An earlier study pooled fossil occurrences from around the globe and statistically reconstructed a mean extinction date of 2.5 Ma, with significant error (~3.6 Ma to 100ky in the future being the max and min extinction dates). We found that in the California record, reliable occurrences are only found in early Pliocene rocks. All examples of late Pliocene or Pleistocene teeth were either poorly dated, reworked from Miocene rocks, had poor provenance, or are completely missing (and never photographed) and therefore the identification cannot be confirmed. We thus predicted a 3.6 Ma extinction date. To test this, we re-analyzed the dataset published in 2014 but chucked a bunch of bad data and exhaustively re-researched the stratigraphy of each locality and corrected about 3/4 of the dates in the remaining dataset, and added our new California records. When we analyzed this corrected dataset, our margin of error (the time between the max and min extinction dates) shrank from 3.6 million year long interval to 900,000 years; *probably* extinct by 3.6 Ma (mean extinction date), definitely by 3.2 Ma (min extinction date), and possibly as early as 4.1 Ma (max extinction date). This extinction therefore precedes the 2.6 Ma supernova, as well as the Plio-Pleistocene marine mammal extinction (which in all likelihood was not a mass extinction or an extinction event, rather just a period of higher extinction/origination rate). About 4 Ma is when fully serrated Carcharodon carcharias teeth show up in the North Atlantic, indicating when the two overlapped, however briefly. We think this biotic event matches best - the mechanics of exactly how this was driven are to be figured out by someone else, but perhaps adult Carcharodon outcompeted juvenile O/C megalodon prior to becoming gigantic. Some analyses of Otodus lineage growth rate is going to be necessary. Here's the open access paper here: https://peerj.com/articles/6088/ Here's a blog writeup I did for PeerJ here: https://peerj.com/blog/post/115284881293/early-pliocene-extinction-of-the-mega-toothed-shark-otodus-megalodon-boessenecker/ Excellent summary in Nat Geo: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/02/megalodon-extinct-great-white-shark/ CNN: https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/14/us/megalodon-extinct-earlier-scli-intl/index.html Fox News: https://www.foxnews.com/science/megalodon-shocker-huge-killer-shark-may-have-been-wiped-out-by-great-whites Forbes: https://www.forbes.com/sites/melissacristinamarquez/2019/02/14/great-white-sharks-may-be-the-reason-why-giant-megalodon-shark-is-extinct/#6a06986a6486 Daily Mail: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6700495/Giant-50-foot-long-predatory-shark-went-extinct-one-million-years-earlier-previously-thought.html
  14. pliocene fossils

    Hi, I a geologist from Tunisisa,I found some fossils last trip. Please, could you help me to identify this fossils?
  15. Bone or tooth

    I found this item On Sunday while walking the small beach at Cherry Point. Shaped similar to tooth with the ridge on lateral surface but matrix is adhered tightly and hides the contours in pictures. Any help greatly appreciated! 3 inches by 2 inches
  16. Possible Mastodon Tooth Fragment

    Good afternoon, I went out to the beach by the old scout hut at Cherry Point and found several interesting items. I believe two of the pieces are fragments of a mastodon tooth. I will try to post as many pictures as possible. Thank you
  17. Hey guys! I actually missed a week of uploading, but Cris and I got back at it and went to one of our new creek sites for some more exploration! Unfortunately, we gave it a good go and didn't find anything great. So we literally went after dark to some of our trusty old road sites where fill material is used as road fill. This turned out to be an absolutely amazing decision, and ended up being one of our best hunts on the roads to date! This video is chock-full of weirdness, and great finds! Give it a watch when you get some time
  18. Cleaning Ecphora

    I've had this hanging around the house for a while, and thought I'd see if there's some suggestions for getting the limestone/ coral and barnacle growth off this rather large Ecphora (about 5 inches). Read about water with vinegar or bleach, but that sounds way too harsh. Thanks.
  19. Siphocypraea mulepenensis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Cypraeidae Siphocypraea mulepenensis Petuch, 1994 Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Near Imokalee, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Like S. problematica with a comma shaped anterior sulcus and narrow aperture. The shell differs in being shorter with a pyriform shape. The shell around the anterior sulcus noticeably protrudes.
  20. Siphocypraea ketteri

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Cypraeidae Siphocypraea ketteri Petuch, 1994 Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Near Imokalee, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Another form transitional between S. carolinensis and S. problematica. Differs from S. trippeana by having a wider shell and flattened base with noticeable wrinkles along the base. Petuch assigns this species in the genus Pseudadusta.
  21. Siphocypraea lindae

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Cypraeidae Siphocypraea lindae (Petuch, 1986) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Near Imokalee, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Very close to S. carolinensis with a high dorsum and simple sulcus but with a narrower posterior aperture and stronger denticles on parietal lip. Petuch assigns this species in his genus Pseudadusta.
  22. Siphocypraea transitoria

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Cypraeidae Siphocypraea transitoria Olsson & Petit, 1964 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Although common in the Kissimmee River area, this specimen is from APAC in Sarasota where it is much rarer. Very close to S. problematica with slightly less coiling of the anterior sulcus and a slightly wider posterior aperture. Petuch would call this Siphocypraea streami.
  23. Siphocypraea hughesi 

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Cypraeidae Siphocypraea hughesi Olsson & Petit, 1964 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Kissimmee River, Highlands County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Restricted to the Kissimmee River area. Distinctive shape, wide and squat. Anterior sulcus approaching that of S. problematica. Petuch assigns this species to Akleistostoma (Olssonicypraea).
  24. Siphocypraea trippeana

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Cypraeidae Siphocypraea trippeana Parodiz, 1988 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Typically, shell is small and narrow with a high dorsum. The sulcus has a slight bend more so than the S. carolinensis complex, described as a keyhole appearance and a narrow aperture like S. problematica.
  25. Siphocypraea carolinesis floridana

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Littorinimorpha Family Cypraeidae Siphocypraea carolinesis floridana (Mansfield, 1931) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Highly variable much more so than S. carolinensis. The dorsum tends to be not as high as S. carolinensis and parietal denticles are more strongly expressed but shares the uncoiled anterior sulcus and wide posterior aperture. This is the common Siphocypraea found in the Sarasota shell pits. Also, Akleistostoma.
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