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Found 22 results

  1. Here is a brief report from one of our latest forays into Calvert County, MD. The well-known stretch of shoreline along the western Chesapeake Bay is loaded with Miocene fossils, with the Calvert, St. Mary's, and Choptank formations progressively exposed along a ~24 mile stretch of beach and cliffs. We found an Airbnb in Lusby, MD which was not too far from Matoaka Lodges, which seemed the best bet since the nearly 2 mile walk to the beaches at Calvert Cliffs State Park is impractical for our family at this time. Covid-19 and Maryland's onerous private land regulations can make it tough if not impossible to access some of the other municipal beaches along the coast. For example, Brownies Beach, Dares Beach, Cove Point, and Flag Pond are all restricted in some way to town or county residents only. Matoaka Lodges however will grant day-pass access for a small fee, and the beach is from my experience very diverse and productive in its fossils. We spent a total of 5 hours there, employing an 1/8" sieve and also simply walking the surf line. The largest tooth pictured here actually washed up at my feet as I was surreptitiously bending over at the same time. Most of the rest were found with the sieve. Most of these are shark or sting ray teeth and a few turtle shells plus some of the smaller items I could not identify. A local told me that porpoise teeth can be found there also. This lot comprises the smallest fossils found; in addition to these (mostly) teeth and shell fragments were found a large and diverse sample of vertebrate fragments, corals, miscellaneous other fossils (snails, mollusks, etc.) which I will post in the follow-up report to this one. Having spent some time at some of the other sites along Calvert Cliffs this summer, I would say based on the diversity, number of fossils, and time spent collecting, that Matoaka is definitely worth the return trip.
  2. Dolphin skull

    While working in James City NC today I ran across someone else's find sitting on a bulkhead. It appears to be modern but it was still something to see completely intact.
  3. Hey all - in discussing my recent research on the new extinct dolphin Ankylorhiza with science journalists, I was reminded of previous frustrations from earlier discussions with students, museum visitors, fossil collectors, journalists, and even other scientists about the meaning of the words whale, dolphin, and porpoise. Some disagreements were on this forum, others were on facebook fossil groups - the whole notion of "that's not a dolphin tooth that's a whale tooth" or vice versa is plagued by the fact that these terms have multiple established meanings and are imprecise, leading to lots of confusion, to the point where I pretty much have to start every discussion off with "there are two groups of cetaceans living today..." - many, for example, are confused about toothed baleen whales existing if only odontocetes have teeth. One thing I tried was to conduct a twitter poll showing four modern species and asking if people thought they were a whale, dolphin, or porpoise - and the majority was right only half the time: a leaping beaked whale was thought to be a dolphin, and a small dolphin was thought to be a porpoise. I've had so many discussions on here and have had to repeat some of these arguments ad nauseam, so I thought I might as well crystallize my thoughts into a blog post. I hope you enjoy it! http://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2020/07/whale-dolphin-or-porpoise-meaningful.html
  4. Porpoise / Dolphin Bone?

    Is this bone from a porpoise or dolphin? it came from Palo’s verdes California and was found on the beach there. If so any idea on the age?
  5. Looking to get an ID on this little guy...is it just an extremely worn sharks tooth stripped of its enamel? Whale tooth? Porpoise tooth? Found on the beaches of Wilmington, NC, in dredged material. It was definitely something at some point in time!
  6. Hop 5 03/30/19

    1. Hemipristis serra: One of my first teeth of the day, found in the water. Small, but nice colors and perfect serrations. 2. Carcharias cuspidata: Flawless sand tiger. Symmetrical and super sharp, with both double cusplets intact. 3. Galeocerdo aduncus: Gorgeous tiger, almost looks like a G. cuvier because of size. Very nice root to crown contrast. 4. Odontocete tooth: Little porpoise/dolphin tooth with a long, thick root. In very good condition. 5. Ecphora sp.: A very nice small Ecphora, nearly complete, just missing the white part at the top. Rare to find more than a fragment of these at Brownies. Cast your votes! The poll will end in three days, on April 4th at 3:00 p. m. EST. Hoppe hunting!
  7. Whale of a porpoise tooth

    Hi TFF, I'd love your help identifying the cetacean tooth pictured below. I found the tooth below while fossil hunting in eastern Virginia with @Gizmo. The tooth is from the base of the Claremont Manor member of the Eastover Formation. The color and condition indicate that it has been reworked from the underlying Calvert Formation. Thanks in advance for any help or comments!
  8. After tallying all the votes on the Hop 5 of my trip report, the "Hoppe Tripmaker" for Bayfront Park 01/04/19 is.......... #3 Odontocete Tooth Odontocetes are toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises. Fossilized teeth from these creatures can be found in Miocene sediments such as the Calvert Cliffs, where this particular specimen was discovered. They seem to be relatively uncommon, especially when compared with abundant fossils like shark teeth or shells. My collection only contains about 15 of these teeth in total, and this one is perhaps the prettiest and most well preserved of them all. It's a gorgeous tooth, most likely from a small dolphin, and certainly deserving of the title of Tripmaker. The best find of each trip is not always the biggest! This little tooth beat a large Mako and complete cookie (which tied for second place, by the way). Below is a picture of the Tripmaker under my brand new magnifying glass. I hope you all enjoy the new Hop 5 voting concept. Thank you to all who participated!
  9. Hello, I am helping a friend identify this fossilized vertebrae that she found on the SE NC on the beach. It is heavy and cold to the touch it feels like stone to me.
  10. Unusual Miocene Odontocete Tooth

    Hi, This tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is Calvert Formation (~18-22 MYA). It is clearly from an odontocete, but it is unlike any other I've found from this location, or anywhere for that matter. The crown is not perfectly conical, instead having a rather wide appearance. But what really makes this tooth so odd is the root. It is flattened and bumpy, while most odontocete teeth have long, smooth roots like those of human teeth (this obviously makes sense, as they are both mammals). The fossil is about 3/4" from the tip of the crown to the bottom of the root. If you look closely (it may be difficult to see in the pictures provided), it almost looks like the tooth is encased within the root, and could be pulled out. This at first led me to consider the possibility that the strange flat part may actually just be matrix and the fossil is just a typical odontocete tooth not fully uncovered. However, after further inspection I am confident that everything is fossilized and the entire fossil is a single tooth. So now the only questions are what animal did this tooth belong to and why is it so unusual in appearance? I am certainly hoping that it may be a small Squalodon tooth because I've never found one and I think they're just awesome. Any information is appreciated, as always. Thank you!
  11. Seal or porpoise tooth?

    Found this at Calvert Cliffs. My first thought was a porpoise tooth, but is it possibly a seal? Thanks!
  12. Tiny Croc Tooth or Odontocete?

    I'm secretly hoping this is what I think it is. I was sure it was a crocodile tooth (my first one!) but I'm less certain of that after a few members mentioned it resembled a detached crown of a porpoise tooth. The matter was discussed but never concluded, so I'd like to see what others have to say. Aside from the pictures, here's what I can provide as help with the ID: The tooth was found at Brownies Beach (Calvert Formation) It is slightly under half an inch in height There appears to be two cutting edges on opposite sides of the tooth While not obvious, it seems to have some vertical ridges It is completely hollow and very light As always, help is much appreciated. Sorry that I couldn't get excellent pictures of this one. It was a bit harder to photograph than most other things. Thanks in advance!
  13. Small Marine Mammal ?

    A hunting friend asked me to ID a tooth he recently found: I think it is dolphin or porpoise, but not positive, so I'll resurrect an old TFF thread as background and provide a couple of photos.. Here is the recent find. It is a tad over 1 inch. Sometimes I mis_identify as gator. This is not gator based on root termination.
  14. Porpoise?

    Hi, I found this yesterday while hunting teeth in Virginia and am wondering if this is a porpoise tooth. It is about the size of a US penny. Any help would be great. David
  15. I found this in aurora fossil mine, late 70's. I was a young kid at the time and found this in many, many pieces. I remember digging all around finding what I could. I'm sure I wasn't as thorough as I needed to be, but oh well..... Over the years I have never been able to properly Id this. It looks like a long beaked whale or porpoise jaw. The closest thing I can find online is a Ninoziphius Platyrostris. As always your helps is greatly appreciated.....
  16. Porpoise tooth?

    Is this from a Porpoise? Is it even a tooth?
  17. I recently won an Auction that was started by Tony (YNOT) and it included a Medium box of Sharktooth Hill micro matrix. The below pics, along with specimen counts, are examples of some of the items that I found in this matrix. (+80) Cetorhinus (Basking Shark) (+300) Myliobatis mouth plates
  18. Here are some pics of a project I have been working on. These bones come from a Calvert formation (lower to mid Miocene) dolphin found on August 2. There are two pics of the same block from different angles. The second pic was done after a little more work and I had uncovered another vertebra. In this block there are at least six vertebrae (including the atlas), a humerus, and a rib (the end is just visible above the "2" on the ruler). More to come as collection and preparation continues.
  19. Calvert Cliffs - 2Nd Trip

    The images linked to this blog entry are from my second trip to the Calvert Cliff formations (St. Mary's). Not a bad day considering the tide was rather high, the waves choppy, and a large group of loud students from the University of Salisbury showed up. Ran into two other forum members; wolffish and randsphilly
  20. 3.13.16 Finds, Day Of Megs

    The winds finally backed off, the water finally dropped and it was a great a day on the water. I only had four or five hours so I focused on a few spots that have a history of doing well. Once again they treated me right!
  21. Whale And Porpoise Teeth?

    I have two teeth shown below. The long skinny ones I have been told are whale teeth and the other I was told is a porpoise tooth. I found images in a book showing it may be a wolf sized dog, a seal or or possible a whale shark. Anyone have any opinions? I have a few of both in a display shot in the last image. Thanks in advanced for the input!
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