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Found 48 results

  1. Hi Folks, I did not take a true before picture so I am sorry, but here is my work on a branching stem. The sandstone matrix is very hard and breaks very randomly. In this case, I think due to winter freezing and thawing with moisture, there was a natural crack where the rock split and another that can't be seen in the photo that greatly aided the prep. I used a dremel with a carbide burr to ensure the crack would end where I wanted to and not spread into the already exposed fossil. I also have the counterpart to this fossil so I wanted to see what I could get. The first photo is the fossil with the removed pieces put back on. Second is the revealed branch, and third is a close up of the other fossil that showed up in the split. Some kind of textured bark impression or larger branch.
  2. I bought a slab some time ago, and have finally gotten around to prepping it. (Note, I do not have an air scribe, so it takes quite a bit of time) Current Progress: (20 minutes) Only the vertebrae and a few ribs are visible here. I have noticed as I am going along, it is much more difficult than it appeared when I first purchased it. The skin is fairly intact, though there are some patches that are missing. Use a gum eraser to help clean away the dust because it is gentle, particularly on the fragile bones. All I am using is a small hand prepping tool, and though it is time consuming, it still works for me.
  3. Here are copies of images that Kris posted in the "Auction prep" topic. The slab he is prepping contains this large plant fragment. I have scanned Grande's text looking for a match, but have had no success. Does anyone have a clue as to a possible donor of the fragment? Also check out Kris' interesting prep series on this Notogoneus specimen.
  4. @StevenJDennis brought me quite the project. It's a central Texas mammoth tusk that is in terrible shape! Texas tusks are as close to the complete opposite in preservation as compared to Siberian or Alaskan tusks. They are always brittle, broken, and just looking for an excuse to fall apart. Props to Steven for rescuing this monster from a terrible fate in the back of an old man's shed! The pics below show the tusk in the sate of preservation as they arrived to me. I have spent the last week with the fragments on end literally pouring medium viscosity PVA solution (about as thick as 20w 20 motor oil) into the cracks in an effort to stabilize them. 1 gallon later and they are beginning to toughen up a bit. PVA application will continue until the fragments will no longer absorb the solution. Then, I will attempt reassembly of the fragments. Unfortunately, there has been serious degradation of the fragments in many places. More to come!
  5. Hi, I'm wondering if anybody can provide any insight about this fossil I'm attempting to prep. It's from an abandoned quarry in northern Illinois where I've found lots of Silurian Calymenes, but I'm not sure what this is. I'm paranoid to continue prepping without knowing more.. any ideas?
  6. So, I had a Greenops boothi that was missing the the glabella and the entire left portions of the cephalon. @ischua and I dug this fella up at Penn Dixie in the fall. I decided to finally have a go at him to see how much could be salvaged. Here's the before: A little more work: A little more: And, finally: For size:
  7. So, in my previous post, "Day One In The New Workshop", I had posted a pic of a plate that I had hoped would be an Eldredgeops rana mass mortality plate. I decided to do some work on it to see if there were any more than the two hiding in the matrix. Apparently the rest of the trilobites opted for the blue pill. Turns out there was just the two, one enrolled, one prone, and neither 100% complete. There was also a nice little piece of what would appear to be Streptelasma ungula coral. I have been asked several times to "blog" about my prep work as I go. In an attempt to abide, I am going to try and share as I go with this piece and others! So, after some initial prep, it looked a little better. Once I determined that these little fellas were not with friends, I used my Dremel engraver to rough out and shape the surrounding matrix. I did, at one point, accidentally pop the lentil-sized roller off of the matrix. Thankfully, I had the foresight to hold down the actual fossils with my thumb as I was working around them, thus denying him the opportunity to experience flight. In the above picture you can see that I started to smooth out the rough cuts surrounding them. I did this with my secret weapon, the tattoo machine with a 7RL needle. As you can see in the final picture from the day (above), I started to prep out the coral and continued to contour around the "bases" of the two bugs. You can also see that the roller has a squished head, and that there is a small piece missing from the right eye of the prone. (As I mentioned earlier, neither of the two were in perfect shape to begin with.) In my next post for this one, I will show the surrounding matrix contoured out and hopefully more detail on the buglets. This is proving to be a tricky prep as they are tiny! (See below) Next time, I will try to get more "step-by-step" pictures to walk through the entire process!
  8. Just spent the first morning in the new workshop playing with some bugs. Thought I would share day 1 progress. Eldredgeops rana after first prep session. Greenops boothi after some basic prep. Missing the cranidium and left librigena unfortunately. Tiny little Eldredgeops rana, with another little cephalon in association. Thinking this one has the potential to be a nice multi. Usually when I find these tiny little fellas this close together it's a mass mortality.
  9. hello, looking for your expert advice. i would like to do some touch up work on a fossil to bring out more details. it is a keichousaurus in a hard slate material. i mostly want to work on the head and rib areas. i don't want to mess it up so looking for something safe for fine detail work, would something like this work? https://www.amazon.com/Paasche-Airbrush-AEC-K-Abrasive-sprayer/dp/B001CJIHFI/ref=sr_1_1?s=miscellaneous&ie=UTF8&qid=1482120215&sr=8-1&keywords=Paasche+air+eraser
  10. Hi Everyone, I'm new to the prepping world and have a couple of questions that hopefully you can help me with. I have a number of Pennsylvanian aged plant imprints that I found and I am wondering if there is any prep work that needs to be done to keep them in pristine condition. As of now I have not done anything to them. These fossils are on dark gray slabs of shale and are a bit hard to see without proper lighting. Questions: 1.) Is there a way to highlight the imprints on the dark shale to make them stand out more? They're a similar color to the shale and are hard to see without lighting. 2.) Is there anything that should be done to help preserve these imprints over time? For example, should these fossils be coated in anything to help preserve them, or am I okay leaving them as is? As always thanks for the input!
  11. I searched the forum but i couldent find any posts about different techniques for removing super glue. I have a few pieces that for whatever reason were glued the wrong way or moved slightly when drying. Im wondering if there are some good ways to go about removing super glue without damaging a fossil? I have a few ideas of what might work but im curious what people have tried and what works? In this case im working with four or five pieces of bone that were glued together but one or two are off.. Nick
  12. Hey guys and gals! Went out on Sunday to a new site and had a look around. Managed this! I didnt bother plastering this as it was all in loose pieces. There was a 4th piece under the sand and, just above the right hand side of the digging thing you can see another bit of bone - i don't know if its related but i need to go back and get it. So here is the bit at the top in the above picture. And having cleaned it up i realized i needed to leave matrix in the tooth sockets to support the weak bits that hang out. Lesson learnt and i'll do that on the next section. You can see where i ended up leaving some matrix. Also the jar is paraloid. This bone is weak and chalky! Fortunately, as i get closer to the front there is more bone and it's more intact. Here is the next piece along, viewed from the top and showing the sockets. (i'll clean them out a bit to show the shape better) And here is how the 4 pieces go. The front 2 and the back 2 will join well, to each other, but the middle may not. Hoping they will but doubting at the moment.. Too much matrix to tell right now.. Its sort of a sandstone. Bit sticky and annoying. Getting there though. Thats all for now. I'll do more on the 2nd piece tonight and hoping to have it finished by Sunday. Cheers.
  13. Well I finally started repairing the shell I got in Denver. Starting with the bigger parts, with obvious placement and working out. Currently holding a part as the glue dries Im using a 5 minute epoxy on these two sections, mainly due to difficulty holding long enough for a 30 minute or two hour one. The shell is not as yellow as in this picture. warning, this will be a long documentation of my work as I go along
  14. So i still collected this massive shell, but it is (like most of the shells I find) in pieces. I need advice on what glue to get, to best repair it. It definitely needs stabilization, and the rock is broken in to multiple parts. So far I've had no luck glueing the sandstone
  15. Hey all. I've been practicing a lot with my aro on brachiopods and think I'm ready to tackle some of the more interesting pieces I've been saving. This one is from a stream in White Sulphur Springs, WV. I don't know the formation, but I believe that the brachiopods I am finding in this location are Devonian. I think this might possibly be fish? The matrix is a very hard sandstone. My plan is to cut lines with a masonry blade on my angle grinder, pop the pieces off with a chisel, then get to work with my aro. Any advice before I get started would be appreciated. I'm excited to see what's in there .
  16. Does anyone have experience with ultrasonic cleaning of small fossils?
  17. I have been wanting to make this post for a while, but haven't gotten around to actually getting good pics until today. I have got myself one of the better Platystrophia brachiopods from my Nashville trip in August. It has a good bit of gunk stuck in the radial ribs, and I would at least like to clear a good bit of it out. Any cost effective tips? pics: Pedicle valve Brachial valve
  18. ...or, Always Wear Protection! Monday night I went to the garage to just poke at a fossil for a few minutes. I'd picked up a decent shell still mostly in matrix in the Selma Chalk of Alabama over the weekend. Though I only intended to take a few tentative swipes at it, I ended up spending over an hour on it, chipping away rock with my airscribe, then smoothing out the matrix with my Dremel. Anyone who has ever worked on this kind of material will see where this is going. The rock that comes from this deposit really is chalk. When dry, working on it with any tool, but especially a grinding tool, creates a lot of very fine dust. And since I hadn't really planned on working on it for more than a few minutes, like an idiot I didn't put on my dust mask. Later that night I woke up from a sound sleep to discover that my sinuses were a disaster. Running, stuffed up, and a bad raw burning sensation all the way into my throat. Since then I've had a couple of nights where I didn't sleep for more than two hours at a time, I've become very well acquainted with my Neti Pot, suffered several nose bleeds, have taken enough Sudafed to run a respectably-sized meth lab, and burned through more than one box of tissues. Finally, I think the worst is over. I'm down to merely frequent sneezing and nose blowing. Essentially, I believe I had the equivalent of bad road rash inside my sinuses, caused by the chalk dust irritant. What did I learn from this? Well, probably nothing. I'm kind of dense, apparently. But hopefully others will learn to wear a dust mask when working with this kind of material.
  19. This Coronocephalus trilobite arrived in the mail today. I quite like it! However, it seems to be more or less unprepped and appears quite dirty. Anyone have any idea how I could clean it up? I havnt got an air scribe yet so won't be doing any rock removal but I'm sure I could get it looking a little nicer. There is a lot of dried mud in the cracks and such. I have little experience with trilobites as I've only become interested in them recently, and don't want to damage the fossil. Any advice guys?
  20. I'd like to get the tools, etc. necessary for fossil prep. I have a good eye and a good hand (I think), but I can't nail down exactly what equipment I need. Everyone seems to have something different. Can someone give me a list of everything needed to do fossil prep - the individual things? I know I need an air compressor, but I don't know how much air pressure I need. Brand names would be helpful, too. I sincerely appreciate you taking the time to do this. I'm OK with software, but not so hot with things that plug in! Thanks in advance!
  21. Hi so this is not an ID request more of an advice post. I had a very productive day at Port Mulgrave this week but unlike a number of the people on the shore who were smashing everything in site and leaving anything but perfect fossils strewn across the beach I prefer to collect a few potential nodules to bring home. This is I hope going to yield a nice specimen. Before I start could anyone offer advice on how to start and whether it appears to be a keel on the rim or a geological feature. I have a Dremel and a cheap air pen for detail but have never undertaken anything like this. i am reluctant to just hot it with a hammer. Any thoughts and sorry for the above rant but over the past few weeks the area at Port M has become a draw for treasure hunters rather than collectors. each to their own probably but I see each fossil as special. Steve
  22. Hi, I am looking for someone that can do a good (preferably great) job prepping out a fossil for me. I have a Platyceras that died still sucking the crinoids' backside. I don't have means or equipment to do a proper prep. If you do good work or know someone that does, I'd appreciate the contact. Unfortunately, I am somewhat cash poor but would like to perhaps work out some sort of trade for the work done. I have quite a few fossils or mineral specimens I could trade for the time. Thanks, caldigger
  23. I bought this Malungia laevigata trilobite ($5) because I felt sorry for the little guy. Broken and badly glued. Scratched up with only God knows what. I started to fix it by grinding and smoothing the scratched matrix. I'm leaving the trilobite until I acquire an air scribe, but felt I could at least fix the matrix. Any advice? PS. This matrix is very hard. Also, the first photo was taken in the early morning so has different lighting.
  24. I normally clean my North Sulphur River fossils with a little Simple Green and warm water but it doesn't seem to work on the freshly exposed fossils with the hard grey shale on them. What is something safe that I can try without damaging my finds? All feedback is appreciated.
  25. This is my first attempt at cleaning a Badlands fossil. Brutal. SO much hard chalky rock it took me about 4hrs wit a pic and a little while on the toothbrush. Anyone else here have experience with these fossils? (Pics are before and after)