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Found 6 results

  1. New species or genetic mutation?

    I have been blessed this summer to have some amazing finds up in Green River. A couple of them come in the form of strange pathologies on a common fish. The Priscacara (or Cockerellites as it is now known) Is quite a common fish to find in multiple layers of the Green River Formation. The Cockerellites is closely related to modern perch, and is a highly prized fish due to it's unique appearance! I know there was a paper recently written (I believe in 2010) by John Whitlock, but I cannot seem to find it on any open access sites. Part of his debate for a new genus is fueled by the fact that serrata and liops have differing numbers of dorsal and anal spines. I present to you today 2 of my more uncommon finds from Green River showing variations of these animals. 99%+ of the Cockerellites found have just 10 dorsal spines, I present today my 2 unique finds from this past dig season! Fish number 1 was discovered on July 29, 2017 Fish number 2 was discovered on September 23, 2017 The first picture shows a Cockerellites liops with 11 dorsal spines. this second photos shows an even more perplexing mutation. This Cockerellites liops has 12 dorsal spines!! While multiple fish have been found with 11 dorsal spines, I am unsure if anyone has ever found a fish with 12 dorsal spines. This is a very unique occurrence and should this fish be a new variant it will be donated to Fossil Butte National Monument! Even though he is missing most of his anal fins, this fish could still be a very important specimen to show mutations. So, do you think these 2 fish could represent new species within the Genus? Or are they simply mutations?
  2. I also brought home a small box of prepped out fossil fish today. Ive got a bunch more in my fossil shed, but those will come home another day, including some nice big ones. Ive got to start displaying them. Oh, now I see that ive got the black myo upside down. Dang! RB
  3. Newest Fish Panel

    I just had to show this one off! I saved the Notogoneous from a terrible fate of never being prepped! My buddy thought he was missing part of his head after he roughed it out so he set it aside. Notogoneous is my favourite fish so I took a gamble and had it prepped out, to my surprise it was all there with a wide open mouth! Notogoneous: 24 1/8 inches (61.28cm) Diplomystus: 15 inches (38.10cm) Knightia: 7 inches (17.78cm) Cockerellites (Priscacara): 5 3/4 inches (14.60cm) Entire panel measures 63 1/2 inches (156.21cm) wide by 22 inches (55.88cm) tall.
  4. Priscacara Prep Process

    I bought a slab some time ago, and have finally gotten around to prepping it. (Note, I do not have an air scribe, so it takes quite a bit of time) Current Progress: (20 minutes) Only the vertebrae and a few ribs are visible here. I have noticed as I am going along, it is much more difficult than it appeared when I first purchased it. The skin is fairly intact, though there are some patches that are missing. Use a gum eraser to help clean away the dust because it is gentle, particularly on the fragile bones. All I am using is a small hand prepping tool, and though it is time consuming, it still works for me.
  5. Green River Fish Panel

    Prep was just finished on this lovely panel. All three fish are 100% natural. NO INLAY! NO PAINT! Wonderful panel with three fish. Notongoneous (long skinny guy) Diplomystus (big fat one) Priscacara (spiny one) This panel measures 34 inches tall x 45 inches wide.
  6. Priscacara serrata

    Priscacara Serrata is one of several species of recognized in the Green River formation. It is less common that its relative the Priacacara Liops.
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