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Found 72 results

  1. Pterosaur cervical vertebra?

    Hi, just wondering if this is a pterosaur cervical vertebra (listed as such) since i can't find any similar specimens or references. It is from Morocco (Kem Kem Basin) and is 6.2cm (just under 2 and a half inches).
  2. I was just prepping out a very small piece of bone I found down on the Isle of Wight a few months ago. It ended up looking very different from what I expected, so was hoping someone may be able to suggest what it could belong to. From my very limited experience it looks almost bird like, so was wondering if it could be pterosaur, which is found in this location. Early Cretaceous. Chilton chine. Isle of Wight. ..... the bone is hollow with relatively thin walls. Just over 1cm long. I’ve tried to get clear photos but they didn’t turn out too well so I’ve had to compensate by posting too many instead.
  3. This fossil comes from the Phosphate Mines of Kourigba, Morocco. The fossil is 10cm and the matrix is 14 x 11cm overall. Is it possible to identify this fossil?.
  4. Fully rooted pterosaur tooth?!!!

    Hi all. I saw this online and I was amazed. The fossil is sold as a pterosaur tooth from Kem Kem. Size: 49 x 8 mm This species of pterosaurs could reach a wingspan of up to 6 meters ! » Could it really be a fully rooted pterosaur tooth? For me it’s really big for a pterosaur. What do you think? Never saw a fully rooted one. Rare? Do you think it could be a fake? Regards.
  5. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dinosaur-museum-altmuehltal-exhibits-real-dracula-677624753.html https://www.thelocal.de/20180323/worlds-largest-pterodachtyl-dracula-museum-altmuehltal https://flowcenter1.flowworks.de/flowrooms/screeningroom/XrsPzXMAmoDioHBuhNZs_layoutneutral/284/ "The carpal bone alone was larger than that of a mammoth, and the neck was the width of a full-grown man," says paleontologist Mátyás Vremir, member of the Transylvanian Museum Society. I-a picat fața!!!
  6. Siroccopteryx tooth

    From the album Reptile Fossils

    Siroccopteryx moroccensis Mader & Kellner, 1999 A tooth of a Anhanguerid Pterosaur. Location: Kem Kem beds, Morocco Age: Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous

    © Olof Moleman

  7. Pterosaur Tooth

    Hi all, This is my 2,5cm pterosaur tooth that I got for Christmas. I do not doubt that it is from a pterosaur, but I don’t know any information. The previous owner said it is from Africa. I really would like to know the specie,could anyone help me? Thanks for the help.Tell me if you need more pictures.
  8. Pterosaur teeth

    Hi guys, The 4 teeth below are sold to me as Siroccopteryx moroccensis but I know species ID from Kem Kem material is really hard. The left and right tooth are most definitely pterosaur sp tooth but are the two in the middle pterosaur tooth as well? (curved/ straight)
  9. Kem Kem pterosaur tooth?

    Hi all, This little tooth from the Kem Kem beds was sold to me at a low price. The seller told me it was a pterosaur tooth. Is this correct? If so, is it possible to tell the species? (I know that Kem Kem species ID is incredibly hard, so I do expect a 'no' on this... BUT, you never know!) I can always make more pictures if needed. Thanks in advance for your answers! Max
  10. The attached paper describes a diverse pterosaur assemblage from the late Maastrichtian of Morocco that includes not only Azhdarchidae but the youngest known Pteranodontidae and Nyctosauridae. The fossils described come from the upper Maastrichtian phosphates of the Ouled Abdoun Basin, in northern Morocco http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.2001663
  11. Rare Find For NSR!

    I had a good hunt at the North Sulphur River Texas. I found a nice variety and possibly the first Pterosaur limb bone ever found at NSR.
  12. Pterosaur or Enantiornithine coracoids?

    Dear Guys, I have found three coracoid bones in flintstone that are about 0,5 cm length and made the cavities of them by needle. There are two versions about these fossil ID in my opinion- enantiornithine bird or pterosaur (pterosaur is more possible because the lower wider part of bones is not very wide as in almost all birds and the pterosaur, e.g. ornithocheiridae coracoid shape is very similar!). If these are pterosaur coracoid bones they should belong to small species (maybe rhamphorhynchoids), if small bird bones- they should be very primitive, probably early Cretaceous and I do not know any birds with this shape except Enantiophoenix (Enantiophoenix coracoid is even little wider and the bone cavity is very small, not so big as in my specimens). Please help to identify these remains by the coracoid form in pterosaurs, primitive birds or even tiny dinosaurs. Any help will be appreciated! Best Regards Domas
  13. Another One I'm Not Sure Of...

    I've got this one fossil that I'm not quite sure how to classify it... It\s supposed to be a fossil Pterosaur tooth found in Kem Kem Beds of Morocco.... 1.75" long... However, it doesn't match any of my Pterosaur teeth... Or Crocodile, or Spinosaurus... Is it some sort of fish tooth? Thanks in advance, more pics if needed...
  14. Hi, Saw this 'Pterosaur claw' for sale (first time i have seen something like this for sale) and would like to know if this is the correct id or if it is something else (i believe it might be fish but wanted to ask the experts). It is 1.3 inches long (3.3cm) and is from the Kem Kem. Thanks.
  15. A couple of Kem Kem bones

    Hi guys, a couple of bones here I'd like a little help with please:
  16. My Jurassic Park - Bones

    A few items I recently picked up at the Tucson show. Others will follow Nice size Pterosaur upper beak. Big Dorsal from a Sauropod - needs to be prepped to remove matrix glued on the bone. Will tackle after the show. Very Arthritic bone.. believe its Phalanx 2 but fits well with the above carpal. A Theropod indet but similar to a Spino on the most recent paper. Who really knows at this point with how little we have to go with and just sketches
  17. Pterosaur

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    Pterosaur tooth from Kem Kem, Morocco.
  18. PTEROSAUR TOOTH.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pterosaur tooth Morocco Late Triassic–Late Cretaceous Pterosaurs (from the Greek "pterosauros", meaning "winged lizard") were flying reptiles of the extinct clade or order Pterosauria. They existed from the late Triassic to the end of the Cretaceous (228 to 66 million years ago). Pterosaurs are the earliest vertebrates known to have evolved powered flight. Their wings were formed by a membrane of skin, muscle, and other tissues stretching from the ankles to a dramatically lengthened fourth finger. Early species had long, fully toothed jaws and long tails, while later forms had a highly reduced tail, and some lacked teeth. Many sported furry coats made up of hair-like filaments known as pycnofibers, which covered their bodies and parts of their wings. Pterosaurs spanned a wide range of adult sizes, from the very small anurognathids to the largest known flying creatures of all time, including Quetzalcoatlus and Hatzegopteryx. Pterosaurs are often referred to in the popular media and by the general public as "flying dinosaurs", but this is scientifically incorrect. The term "dinosaur" is restricted to just those reptiles descended from the last common ancestor of the groups Saurischia and Ornithischia (clade Dinosauria, which includes birds), and current scientific consensus is that this group excludes the pterosaurs, as well as the various groups of extinct marine reptiles, such as ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, and mosasaurs. Like the dinosaurs, and unlike these other reptiles, pterosaurs are more closely related to birds than to crocodiles or any other living reptile. Pterosaurs are also colloquially referred to as pterodactyls, particularly in fiction and by journalists. Technically, "Pterodactyl" refers only to members of the genus Pterodactylus, and more broadly to members of the suborder Pterodactyloidea of the pterosaurs. The anatomy of pterosaurs was highly modified from their reptilian ancestors by the adaption to flight. Pterosaur bones were hollow and air-filled, like the bones of birds. They had a keeled breastbone that was developed for the attachment of flight muscles and an enlarged brain that shows specialised features associated with flight. In some later pterosaurs, the backbone over the shoulders fused into a structure known as a notarium, which served to stiffen the torso during flight, and provide a stable support for the scapula (shoulder blade). Most pterosaur skulls had elongated jaws with a full complement of needle-like teeth. In some cases, fossilized keratinous beak tissue has been preserved, though in toothed forms, the beak is small and restricted to the jaw tips and does not involve the teeth. Some advanced beaked forms were toothless, such as the pteranodonts and azhdarchids, and had larger, more extensive, and more bird-like beaks. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Orthinodira Order: Pterosauria
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