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Found 67 results

  1. Big teeth!

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Large shark teeth including cretoxyrhina, cretodus, and ptychodus. (The left ptychodus would've been massive had it been complete.) Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 7/18/19.
  2. More Ptychodus whipplei

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    I found lots of ptychodus this trip. Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 7/18/19.
  3. Cretaceous Mix

    From the album Post Oak Creek

  4. Post Oak Creek

    I hit my honey hole at Post Oak Creek Texas again. I found a few good Ptychodus teeth, another crustacean and my first giant armadillo scute. it was worth the 5 hr round trip.
  5. Ptychodus

    From the album Post Oak Creek

  6. Ptychodus whipplei tooth detail

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of P. whipplei. Collected 6/21/19.
  7. Ptychodus whipplei tooth wear

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    This P. whipplei tooth was well used. Collected 6/21/19.
  8. Can you find the shark tooth? (5)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of P. whipplei. Collected 6/21/19.
  9. Can you find the shark tooth? (3)

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Tooth of P. whipplei. Collected 6/21/19.
  10. Ptychodus whipplei

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Teeth of P. whipplei. Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 6/21/19.
  11. https://bioone.org/journals/Transactions-of-the-Kansas-Academy-of-Science/volume-122/issue-1-2/062.122.0101/First-Associated-Tooth-Set-of-iPtychodus-anonymus-i-Elasmobranchii/10.1660/062.122.0101.short Tooth set I donated to the Sternberg museum has been published.
  12. Ptychodus Tooth ID

    This came from the bottom of the Eagle Ford formation in Texas, could even be the top of the Woodbine formation. Ptychodus lattisimis? last pic for scale
  13. So in my few months of collecting, I’ve really found my favorite tooth to collect is the Ptychodus. Not sure if it’s the fact that it’s a shark tooth but not your normal sharp at a razor style, or just because they are all so different. I am really wanting to start just a collection of Ptychodus teeth. In the mean time, I want to live vicariously through everyone else. I really wanted to start this topic just to see who has the biggest one out there in fossil land! So if you all don’t mind, please post!!!
  14. Our last post ended with goblin sharks and the next era up in the presentation is one of my favorites. We get to the large sharks of the Cretaceous. This is also where the adaptations get more specific and where the science gets more heavy duty for the kids such as discussing regional endothermy. I am a firm believer than you do not "dumb down" complicated science to elementary students. You simplify and explain, you do not dumb it down. First up are the giant crushing sharks, Ptychodus. We present both P. mortoni and p. whipplei though most of the discussion is about mortoni. The kids will learn that there were at least 22 species of Ptychodus sharks, they are Hybodontid sharks and they were found in many locations around the world. They were plentiful in the Western Interior Seaway. They were large, probably very slow swimming bottom dwelling invertebrate eating specialists. We imagine them as looking similar to giant nurse sharks with features of the hybodonts. The focus is on those teeth and we have quite a few to show the kids. We explain how the separate teeth formed a plate like dentition for crushing shells. Next up is one of my favorite sharks, Cretoxyrhina mantelli. The Ginsu Shark gives us the rare chance to really described a prehistoric shark without theorizing much. The fossil record has been generous and this is a very well studied shark. We will explain to the kids that these were large sharks, up to 26 feet, and they looked very similar to modern Great Whites in general appearance. Despite being smaller than some of the monster marine reptiles, they were an apex predator. The key adaptation is the regional endothermy. For kids this goes like this... They had red muscles closer to the body axis and specialized blood vessels that allow for heat exchange. This means they were in a sense warm-blooded and this is a trait seen in modern sharks like Threshers, Makos and White Sharks. They could tolerate colder water than other species and were probably extremely fast sharks. I think the kids will get this concept and they will think this was one cool, though also kinda warm, shark lol At some point, I would love to add Cardabiodon to the program but have not seen around for sale so I assume they are rare and likely expensive. Anyway, the fossils for the program. Pic 1 One of the Ptychodus mortoni teeth we have from the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas. We have six and several are partial but put them all together in a Riker mount and they look pretty good. Pic 2 Ptychodus whipplei teeth from Kamp Ranch formation. We have a small assortment of these teeth and use them in the lab and as giveaways too. Pic 3 Cretoxyrhina mantelli from the Niobrara Chalk. Not the biggest tooth out there but one that I am very thankful to have. I will add more of these as we go along mostly because I love this species !!
  15. Kamp Ranch Texas Ptychodus Teeth

    I purchased some Ptychodus teeth and I can not determine the exact ID on my own. They are smaller than P. whippeli or P. mortoni teeth I have and bigger than the single P. anonymous tooth I have though that is the species I originally though, and still think these are. They are from the Kamp Ranch section of Eagle Ford in Texas. I consulted a very well put together ID guide here but am still just not sure what I have, other than nice Ptychodus teeth lol Any help would be appreciated.
  16. Post Oak Creek - First trip - Need Help

    So my 8 year old son and I did our first ever trip to go find fossils. Attached is what we found in our very untrained 2 hour trip! Haha I literally have no experience outside of reading on this forum from time to time. We may have just picked up some rocks but they looked like fossils to us. I know most most of the teeth are probably goblin and I believe we found 2 Ptychodus. The main things I’m wondering about are the long piece slim piece next to the Ptychodus (possible whale tooth?), two vertebrae looking pieces, the egg shaped piece, and the white pieces. Not sure if they are bones of if they are just random trash we picked up thinking they were treasures. Haha All our tooth fragments Item on right? Egg shaped item Vertebrae? Vertebrae? Cant tell if this tooth is broken or just worn Cool little shell in a rock formation No clue? Looks like bones in rock but could be just river muck This looks like a little flipper but not sure
  17. Ptychodus Teeth

    We just started hunting for shark teeth in August and have found many, but finding the ptychodus teeth is my favorite. I just wanted to show you guys our collection of them so far. Are these all whipplei?
  18. I found this Ptychodus marginalis on a sandbar on a river this spring after a large flood. The river cuts through the lower Smoky Hill Chalk of Northwest Kansas. After I picked it up, I asked myself "is this real?" It is!!! 54mm across.
  19. Funky Kamp Ranch Cretodus

    A few weeks ago I was working an exposure of the middle Turonian Kamp Ranch member of the Arcadia Park Formation in North Texas, using a chisel and the natural bedding planes to pull up slabs. I had been there less than 15 minutes and had only found one small, broken tooth amongst shell hash when I found this almost perfect medium sized Cretodus crassidens. I also found some smaller shark teeth including Ptychodus sp., miscellaneous vertebrate material, and ammonites of possibly multiple species. So far this specimen is my largest from the site The first thing I noticed about it was the white color of most of the enamel and strange patterns covering the exposed tooth. It looked like it had been recently exposed and weathered, but since it was only exposed by me pulling up slabs that is not possible. All the other teeth I found there didn’t have this type of preservation but had the normal brown enamel. I have searched for pictures of any other teeth with patterns like this, but so far nothing. I prepared it out of the rock and can see that the patterns occur on both the front and back of the blade and root. It is 35 mm diagonal and 25 mm root width. It was resting just a few millimeters above a large inoceramid shell. The tooth is perfect except that the tip of the left cusp broke off before fossilization. There are certain areas where the blade isn’t white and there are no patterns, but for the most part the pattern covers the tooth. I was also able to rub off a bit of the white with my finger, but it seems that the patterns are embedded in the tooth itself since it is also on the root. Here are some pictures. I am hoping the origin of these patterns can be explained and any links and/or pictures of other teeth like this can be provided. The first three are before prep and the rest are after. Thanks in advance! FIG 1. FIG 2.
  20. Cretaceous fossils from Alabama

    These are some of the fossils I found a couple of weeks back . Wonder if anyone knows what the last tooth is ?
  21. Ptychodus shark tooth

    From the album In-Situ Shots(various locations)

    6-9-18 Denton County, TX
  22. Ptychodus shark tooth

    From the album Other Locations

    4-14-18 Lake Texoma Grayson County, TX
  23. Ptychodus shark tooth

    From the album Other Locations

    4-15-18 Grayson County, TX
  24. Thought I would share this little guy. Wife found it on the shores of Lake Texoma on the border of TX and OK. Latissimus?
  25. I explored a new creek spot on the North Sulphur River and had a good day with a nice variety. The Native American pottery and artifacts were a nice surprise at NSR. I rode over to Post Oak Creek only to find my favorite spot posted so I explored a new spot for one hour and found a few nice teeth.
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