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Found 47 results

  1. Hi, Some weeks ago, I found those spatangoid echinoids in my usual Upper campanian/Lower Maastrichtian hunting zone of SE of Pyrenees: I think they fit well with Diplodetus brevistella, as shown in http://www.echinologia.com/galeries/micrasteridae/index.html#diplodetus But, I found no other references of Diplodetus in the Pyrenees, and hardly in distant zones of Spain, which makes me doubt (Diplodetus is a genus mostly found in Northern Europe)
  2. Aristotle's lantern ?

    Hi, I found this crushed echinoid in an Upper Campanian/Lower Maastrichtian stage of the Pyrenees. "Not much of a piece", I tought (likely a Micropsis or a Phymosomatoid). But I wonder if this can be its crushed Aristotle's lantern: Close-up: The other side:
  3. Hi all, Some weeks ago, I found a site pretty rich in brachipods from the Late Pliensbachian/Early Toarcian in my area (Pedraforca Zone, SE Pyrennes) So, I made a parenthesis in my Upper Cretaceous usual issues, for a change, and I have been picking & preparing them last weeks. This site is very well studied in this paper (in French), and in fossilworks. I probably i found all the species mentioned from the site: Telothyris pyrenaica Telothyris jauberti Quadratirhynchia vasconcellosi Soaresirhynchia sp. Soaresirhynchia (Alméras, 1994) (former Stolmorhynchia) is a genus of little brachiopods first described by Alméras in a study about Portugueses Toarcian specimens, but are common in all the Iberian-Pyrenean Toarcian basin, from Portugal to South France. Unfortunately, they show great morphology diversity, and I must confess the I am not be able to distinguish one specie from another (S.bouchardi, S.flamandi, S.rustica). Maybe @ricardo could help. These are some examples: Homoeorhynchia batalleri And finally, the only Liospireferina falloti I found, though in poor condition:
  4. Pleuromya ? (Jurassic bivalve)

    Hi, I have found this piece in a well-known jurassic site where brachs abound (Late Pliensbachian/early Toarcian, Tenuicostatum biozone, Iberian-Pyrennes basin) My guess is genus Pleuromya. At species level, Pleuromya rotundata is mentioned in the zone, but I find nothing about it (I fear of an invalid or junior species). It looks like Pleuromya uniformis, of whitch @Ludwigia and @nala have posted some pictures.
  5. Crinoid columnals ?

    I found yesterday this -I guess- pieces of crinoid columnals in a Lias (Hettangian) strata. In my area -Pedraforca zone, SE of Pyrenees- Jurassic sites and crinoids are rare (most sites are Upper Cretaceous), so I know very little about them. Tne only crinoid mentioned for the area and period is Pentacrinites. Can you confirm/refute my guess? Thanks.
  6. Beekite rings

    Last January 12, I found some Exogyra sp. oysters in a limestone Late Campanian / Early Maastrichtian strata (SE Pyrenees, Catalonia, Spain), who turned to show abundant beekite rings. I owe to @abyssunder my knowledge of this mineral phenomenon, which, in my area,occurs mainly over laminar-type shells like oysters' (It can occur on other fossils, though). Have you fossils with beekite rings ?
  7. Diplodetus_5.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Close-up view of the four gonopores
  8. Diplodetus_4.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Peristome D-shaped with the opening facing forward; with narrow rim. Labrum slifhtly projecting
  9. Orthopsis miliaris 3.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Apical disc. Madrepores in G2 plate are clearly visible
  10. Hi everyone. I would expose a paleontological ID question that intrigues me. Let me do it in a storytelling style. Prologue Last November I found this beautiful bug in a limestone Upper Campanian /Lower Maastrichtian strata in the SE of Pyrenees, Catalonia (Spain). So, I start a little detective process... which turned not to be so little. This cidaroid specimen is almost complete, retaining even its plates, which is rather rare. In fact, its plates are of most importance in this story. Chapter 1 In 1933 French paleontologist Jules Lambert found some cidaroid specimens in the Pyrenees, in a place not far from I live, called Falgars (a Holy Mary sanctuary surrounded by meadows and woods, a very nice place). He described the species as Typocidaris falgarsensis, designing a holotype. He donated –among others- the holotype to the Museu Geologic del Seminari de Barcelona (Seminary’s –catholic- of Barcelona Geological Museum). But during the turmoil of revolutionary events of Spanish Civil War the Seminary’s was sacked in 1936 and the holotype was lost. In 1997 paleontologist J.J.Carrasco did a revision of the species and fixed a neotype, a specimen found some 4 km west of Falgars, in strata continuity, near the little village of Sant Julià de Cerdanyola. He reclassified it as Temnocidaris (Stereocidaris) falgarsensis (Lambert 1933). He did it in this paper (in Spanish) (The exact site where the original holotype was found is now forgotten) Sant Julià de Cerdanyola village I went to the MGSB museum, where director Dr. Calzada kindly allowed me to compare my specimen with the neotype, and as far as I know they are the same. ID solved? Not entirely In 1991 North-American paleontologists D.B.Blake and W.J.Zinsmeister described a new genus and new species of cidaroid echinoid from the Maastrichtian of Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula: Almucidaris durhami. As they said here The species is unique in that the plates of the female expanded and hollowed to form marsupia. Maybe not so unique, though, as during the last 90’s (I don’t know when exactly) some specimens of cidaroid echinoids forming marsupia were found around... Sant Julià de Cerdanyola. You can see them in this thread of the Spanish Foro Nautilus (my specimen is the last one, and was found some 15 km. west of Sant Julià, not far from the town of Berga. Note that it has no marsupia, so it is arguably male). Andrew B. Smith took the view that Pyrenean Upper Cretaceous cidaroids showing marsupia should be classed in the genus Almucidaris, as he stated in The Echinoid Directory. In fact A.B.Smith made for the first time this statement in: Smith, A.B. & Jeffery, C.H. 2000. Maastrichtian and Palaeocene echinoids: a key to world faunas. Special Papers in Palaentology 63, 1-406. Unfortunately, I have no access to this paper. I have sent some messages to TED, with no answer. Unsolved enigmas So, we Spanish amateur or professional paleontologists have assumed Andrew B. Smith’s view, calling our specimens Almucidaris falgarsensis. But some questions remain unresolved. a) If specimens with marsupia are females, what about the male ones (as mine)? The belonging of arguably male specimens of Temnocidaris (Stereocidaris) falgarsensis to the genus Almucidaris can’t be stated? This would lead to a very paradoxical situation, with females of one species belonging to a genus and male ones remaining in another (a bizarre sort of sexual discrimination ). b- Are Almucidaris durhami and Almucidaris falgarsensis the same species or only belong to the same genus? c) Have been found specimens in other places, apart from Antarctica and Pyrenees, of cidaroid echinoids having developed large brood chambers in the plates? I highly appreciate any information and suggestions, and I hope I have not bored you.
  11. Upper Cretaceous echinoids ID

    Hello, I found those echinoids in Upper Campanian strata (SE Pyrenees) The first one I guessed to be an Orthopsis miliaris... But there is a problem. Orthopsis' apical disc is dicyclic, and in my specimen it is hemicyclic. I have numbered the plates as in The Echinoid Directory and the ocular plate "V" lies in contact with the periproct: Other options ? The second one is this small one. I guess Thylechinus, but according to TED this is a problematic genus. Apical disc seems dicyclic (madrepores are clearly visible in G2 plate)
  12. Almerarhynchia virgiliana

    New genus and new species first described by Dr. Sebastian Calzada Badia in: C a l z a d a , S., 1974. Almerarhynchia n. gen. virgiliana n. sp. del Maastrichtiense de Figols, Prepireneo catalan. Acta Geológica Hispanica, 9 (3): 92-97. http://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/7365. ID of the specimen confirmed by Dr. Calzada.
  13. Trilobites larvae or something else ?

    Hi everybody, Today, along with trilobites and corals of the french eifellian (-390 _ -380 MY), i found those little bugs, about 2 Cm each and wondered if they were larvae of trilobites or something else. @piranha ?
  14. Aubisque

    Hi, today i went back were i found my first trilobites but this time my husband and i went a little further on the way. It's a mythic col in the history of the cycle race Tour de France, a hard pass to reach and the cycles amateurs love to climb it. They were numerous to do so, the sun was shining and hot, it is summer and as childs are on holidays there was a lot of families. So, we arrived there early to have the most time possible alone. For that we woke up at five o'clock, started at six and were up there at about eight. There, among some lovely flowers,
  15. Nummulites_perforatus2.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Nummulites perforatus, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
  16. Assilina_exponens3.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Assilina exponens, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
  17. Nummulites_perforatus1.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Nummulites perforatus, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
  18. Assilina_exponens2.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Assilina exponens, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
  19. Assilina_exponens1.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Assilina exponens, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
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