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Found 58 results

  1. Huge Colony Found

    Atactotoechus fruticosus Took me about 12 hours to reassemble this Bryozoan colony. Found Tuesday 8/27. The majority of the colony is very nice with all the fronds complete to tips. Its getting heavy with every new piece added. I was lucky that most of the colony was in shale and preserved from weathering. Thank you and Happy Collecting. Moscow fm., Kashong member, New York. 11" x 8" and 5+ lbs.
  2. Clam Shrimp This primitive crustacean is rarer to find than complete trilobites. Found by my gf Paula today (8/19). When alive 380 million years ago,this shell contained a shrimp looking animal. A rare find and large for the species. A pic of a closely related Asmussia (Devonian) shows the anatomy with eyes and antennae. Paula found the fossil exposed in the shale at the streams edge. She called me over to look at it and she of course thought it was a brachiopod. That's understandable. She found a killer Orthospirifer a week earlier at this same locality. It looks like a brachiopod so you can imagine her confusion when I told her it was a branchiopod Some of you like Paula may have never heard of clam shrimp before. But you may have seen or heard of fairy shrimp (Sea Monkeys) and Triops that are alive today. They are all in the same class - Branchiopoda. Thanks, Mikeymig
  3. Cave Lion??

    Hello. First I wanted to thank everyone who responded to me regarding the "bear-dog-Hyena" pictures. I have since identified the specimen as Pachycrocuta brevirostris. So for those of you said "Hyena", you were correct. At first I though it might be a Dinocrocuta, however, areas of the skull simply did not match up. Anyways, I have attached pictures of what I am sure to be a Eurasian Cave Lion. I would like to know if these specimens are common since I may be in the position to purchase it. Any opinions are greatly appreciated. Thanks again.
  4. Bryozoa Horta

    Bryozoa Horta Found - July 23, 2019 Name - Atactotoechus fruticosus Age - Middle Devonian Formation - Moscow, Kashong mbr. Locality - Livingston County, New York, USA Size - 8" x 5" Complete and unprepared. I find these colonies at only one locality here in NY. The majority of the Bryozoa colonies are branching and I have reassembled many over the years (pic included of a typical branching specimen). This is the first unbranching Atactotoechus specimen I found lying on the seafloor like a blob or a Star Trek Horta (in my eye anyway ). The specimen was found in life position on top of a mat of fenestrate bryozoan. A very rare find for me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  5. Okay so I found this interesting specimen in Ithica New York. The formation was early devonian. Is this a cooksonia fossil? On the other side of this rock you can see another fossilzed plant as seen on the front but much smaller and less complete. Below the penny is the most complete out of the three. To the right of the penny you can see a little bit of another. Thank you for taking time reading this. (If it does turn out to be a cooksonia its sadly missing the sprouts)
  6. Hi, Are seahorse fossils considered rare and what is the smallest seahorse ever discovered??? Thanks
  7. Shantungia liui (Ren et al, 2017)

  8. Marine Fossil Id Needed

    I found these fossils about a week ago next to Settlement Canyon Reservoir (Tooele County, Ut). I found them about 6600 feet up in elevation at about 1/5 mile away from the reservoir. The images are of the same rock but taken at different angles and sides, all except the last picture.
  9. Juvenile tyrannosaur teeth

    Are juvenile tyrannosaur teeth rare?
  10. Crocodile vertebrae

    From the album Holzmaden

    These are two crocodile vertebrae from the lower Jurassic (Posidonia Shale) from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. The bigger one is about 8 cm long. Here is a picture of the unprepped fossil: The prep work took about 10 hours. I am very pleased with this find because in general crocodile bones are much rarer than Ichthyosaur bones in Holzmaden. Some more pictures:
  11. Neovenator tooth

    The seller says this tooth is from compton bay on the isle of wight, England. Is it rare or high quality.
  12. I have a dinosauromorph foot print is it rare? I will upload photos of my collection when I get home later today so stay updated.
  13. Triassic Pterosaur Found In Utah

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/rare-desert-pterosaur-fossil-discovered-utah-180969995/
  14. I love collecting Devonian corals. No two are exactly alike and some like this specimen are much rarer then the most collectible fossil (complete trilobites from any period) from New York. Confluens is a highly sought after coral species. Only found in a very limited area. I find one colony for every 500 solitary Heliophyllum halli and only one colony in ten is complete like this specimen. That's why this piece had to be prepped. Well preserved epibionts can be seen in great detail thanks to the meticulous prep job. Heliophyllum halli confluens (Hall, 1877) Middle Devonian colonial rugose coral 88mm x 71mm x 60mm. Found 9/12/2018 in Livingston County, New York. Found - Mikeymig, Prep - Malcolm T. BEFORE AND AFTER PREP PICTURES
  15. Hello whats are the possibility of getting Lythronax, Teratophoneus, Appalachiosaurus and Dryptosaurus tooth fossils ?
  16. Hi all hope your all well. If anyone is willing to trade any rare dino teeth then please message me on here or pm me if preferred. Thank you Liam
  17. Hi everybody, I am looking for a good and complete Hyneria tooth from the Devonian of Red Hill. Feel free to contact me if you have something nice. I can give good material, I have many stuff from the Solnhofen area and more. Best wishes from France :-) Frederic
  18. Alopias Latidens Thresher Shark

    From the album Maryland Fossils

    1/2 inch in height Miocene Choptank Formation
  19. Hello everyone, Haven't seen enough of these “show us” threads lately, and I don’t want to walk to a museum, so I started this thread! I want to see the rarest shark teeth in your collection! It doesn’t have to be self collected, just have to have it. Please include a photo or a few and a measurement or a scale and a description. I’m expecting great things out of this thread!
  20. Dear friends, i hope i am not boring with my amber passion Its real obsession for me This time i'd like to show wonderful, i can say - almost perfect Pseudoscorpion ( False Scorpion ). People thinks often that is extremely rare but its not. I had i think about 30 pieces in career. Often they are very small, even only 1mm. This one had 2mm in max with body and pedipalps. What is interesting - do you see that drop inside ambdomen ? It was Enhydros "running water" but there is huge discussion in amber inclusion market what exactly it is. One side ( with me ) think that is running drop of water inside air sap. Second side think that is moving air bubble. Please check my movie from yt - i showed other amber with very nice Enhydros. I am sorry for the music - if someone got soft ears, turn off sound. For me logical is drop of water. What do you think about it ? If we talk about picture colours - i was playing with lights. Best one in friends opinion ? Cheers from Poland. Artur
  21. Hello Friends, This time i'd like to show something that is very rare for me. Never before i didnt saw that bug in baltic amber. I didnt found yet any material about inclusions of Lygaeoidea. Body 3mm. Enjoy
  22. Found this trilobite Saturday in northern Kentucky. Is it Acidaspis cincinnatiensis or Primaspis crosotus. looks like it might be complete. nervus about trying to prep it since either one is really rare.
  23. T rex teeth and rarity

    I was just asked a question by a couple of comic book collectors who seem to have acquired a passing interest in fossils, as to the rarity of T rex fossils especially teeth. I stated that T rex is one of the best described theropods via the fossil record and that the teeth while very expensive were readily available. The follow up question was along the lines of how many teeth have been found or are field collected on a yearly basis. While I think it might be an impossible question to answer I thought I’ll query the members of the forum.
  24. Something that comes up for me now and again(like right now), is when someone is selling a fossil of something that is extremely rare, or maybe BEYOND extremely rare. Is there an easy place to check that kinda stuff? Find out if fossils are being found of them? Specifically Ive seen sarchosuchus teeth and scutes for sale, but as far as I know, only 1 specimen has ever been found, and that was only the skull, and....I dunno, maybe a few verts or something. Even if a number more have been found, like a dozen individuals or something, there's really no way you would ever find something like that for sale would you? And if you did, it would HAVE to be in the hundreds of thousands or millions, or something?
  25. Odontocephalus sp.

    From the album Trilobites

    Odontocephalus sp. (possibly O. selenurus) Field Collection Devonian Imported fill (Dundee, Bois Blanc, Amherstberg Fms), London, Canada. Cephalic fringe fragment. Very rare in Ontario with only a small number of fragments reported in the last 130 years.
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