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Found 61 results

  1. Rays teeth? (Ukraine)

    Hello! Is it rays teeth and if its possible to identify them? Probably, paleogene or cretaceus. Thanks!
  2. So, I've been hunting sharks teeth on and off in South Alabama since a young child. Since my two kids have gotten self sufficient, me and the wife have been taking alot of trips to the river to look for teeth. Finding the normal small teeth, for our area, got me to wondering if there were bigger teeth in our area. That led me to some late nights of researching the ins and outs of my area. The area we are close to has alot of Eocene era fossils and I quickly learned the Carcharocles auriculatus was THE SHARK during this time period. So, my goal became to find a complete tooth in my little honey hole. We would spend weekend after weekend at the river with the kids. My 8yo and 3yo right there with us digging and sifting! Both who want nothing more than to become paleontologist when they get older and sit there picking out ray plates, vertebrae, and teeth with excitement growing every time they see something in the sifter. Over the past several weeks, we have dug 100s of teeth and many other cool fossils which I have added to our collection but just chips of the elusive Carcharocles auriculatus teeth were all we were finding. Last night while at church, I was talking with a family about our finds thus far. You could see their kid's eyes lighting up with curiosity and they asked if we could take them sometime. We had originally planned on taking time to do some house stuff but I could tell their kids really wanted to go. We made a plan to meet this morning before the rain. We made the long hike to the hunting grounds and began to dig and sift. One after the other, the kids and their parents were yelling with excitement finding their first teeth! I was digging around getting dirt for them to sift when I felt that unmistakable sound of hitting something solid. I cleaned around the area and I saw a serrated edged tooth. Surely not...not a complete tooth. I carefully cleaned around the area to make sure not to damage it. I couldn't believe my eyes. A full tooth! I began to shake a little with excitement. I pulled it from the earth and showed everyone. This only pumped them up even more. Although this tooth is rare for our area, we kept digging with no luck of finding another one. The rain began to come in so we cut the trip short but I've babied this thing around all day, picking it up to make sure it is real and I wasn't dreaming. I know it's no 4" tooth but for me, it may as well be. It's become an infatuation for me and the family, so much so I have been looking at planning a family vacation around fossil hunting. My 8yo has expressed alot of interest in finding a megalodon tooth. So, if you guys and gals know of a good place I can take the family to do something like this please share! Below are a few pictures of the things we have found over the past few months as well as my Carcharocles auriculatus tooth I found today.
  3. Been hunting teeth for some time now and I ran across these two things on my last trip that has me scratching my head. Any help in identifying would be appreciated! The items are #1 and #2. The last pic is of all the teeth me and the family dug. Thanks
  4. I live in the Arabian desert, near Jebel Hafeet. Yesterday I found a pavement tooth of an eagle ray. Today I found a mysterious fossil which looks like it might be part of the body and fins/wings of a ray. I appreciate that their bodies were made of cartilage and that is not usually preserved very well, but in some cases it’s possible. Any opinions would be most appreciated. Thank you so much.
  5. Ray teeth? Pt2

    I need help identifying this piece of dental plaque from a ray. Any ideas?
  6. Ray teeth?

    I need help identifying this piece of dental plaque from a ray. Any ideas?
  7. Hello everyone, I am making a shadow box for my office; before I start doing the final groupings by species and attaching said groupings to the shadow box, I could really use some help. I have made my best educated guesses (using Jayson’s website for references), but since I am a novice, I know I’ve made several mistakes. Will you you please take a look at the attached pictures and let me know if I guessed correctly? If not, will you please let me know the correct answer?
  8. Myledaphus Tooth

    From the album Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    cf. Myledaphus pustulosus Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian~ 66 mya) Lance formation Myledaphus was a genus of freshwater guitarfish commonly found in microsites in western North America.
  9. Mysterious sea tooth

    I have found this thing in a campanian marine phosphate deposit. It came along with fish and shark teeth. It looks like some kind of tooth, but I have no idea. The brown area is translucent and looks like enamel. Although the grey is thicker and sharp. Any experts on cretaceous fish would be welcome Ps. This is definately not just a rock, I am fairly familiar with this deposit and can judge a rock from a fossil. Could anybody I'd this please?
  10. Myliobatid ray tail barb

  11. Leedsichthys Problematicus

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Small section of a fin ray from a Leedsychthys Problematicus tail. About 2" Lower Ox. Clay, Callovian middle Jurassic. 160 mya Hampton Lakes Peterborough, Cambs, UK
  12. Bracklesham teeth ID

    Hi, sorry no scale on old photos, small. These are a few fragment of ray teeth and a couple of others which I am not sure about, would like to label them correctly if possible, any ID would be appreciated. Found them at Bracklesam UK. 1 2 3 4 5
  13. Is there any fellow fossil addict here that could help me to: Aligator skin plate (thats called a scute, right? ) Larger Ray dental plate No need for mint/ spectacular pieces, recognisable will do. Got some trilobite bits & bobs for trade Cheers Pat
  14. G'day everyone! Around a week ago, I received a package of micro matrix from Rattlesnake Creek (Aged late Miocene?), generously given to be by the amazing @GeschWhat. I have only gone through the matrix but was not disappointed. The micro matrix was packed full of shark, ray and fish material, as well as a couple of small bones. Here is some photos of my finds. I have attempted to ID some and left others. If you can ID some of my finds, it would greatly appreciated. All of my current finds Shark teeth (Unknwon ID) Ray Teeth Unknown bone (Mammal?) Lagodon teeth Rhynchobatus? Unknown fish material Thanks for reading!
  15. Stingray tail?

    I have several ray mouth plates but this is a new one for me, could it be part of the tail/barb? Or somthing totally different? Ridged on both sides...
  16. Batoid or Squatina Vertebra?

    Hey everyone, I would like your opinion on this interesting vertebra (from the NJ Late Cretaceous). I identified it a long time ago as a first cervical vertebra from either a ray or an angel shark. An expert looked at some pictures and thinks it is a batoid first cervical vertebra. Sorry about the picture quality, these are old photos. Thanks for any help!
  17. Schizorhiza stromeri.jpg

    From the album Unusual Shark Teeth

  18. I had a seller say ALL stingray fossils are at least marginally "touched up." While other sellers say only some of them have repair. What should I believe? Is everything a lie? :0
  19. Looking at trading my large collection of Eocene shark teeth, ray fossils, and fish fossils from the Nanjemoy Formation of Muddy Creek in Virginia. Looking to trade for rare species of shark teeth or shark teeth from rare locations. I have broken down what is included in the collection below and will post pictures of some of the highlights of the collection in the upcoming posts. All fossils are complete with no repair or restoration. Message me if interested. Here are a couple of links about the location: http://www.elasmo.com/frameMe.html?file=paleo/va/va_eoc.html&menu=bin/menu_fauna-alt.html https://www.dmme.virginia.gov/commercedocs/PUB_152.pdf Fossils included in the collection: Shark Material Striatolamia macrota - 100+ Anomotodon novus & Anomotodon sheppeyensis - 100+ Serratolamna lerichei - 50+ Hypotodus verticalis - 37x Carcharias sp. - 36x Sylvestrilamia teretidens - 22x Odontaspis winkleri - 25x Jaekelotodus robustus - 7x Palaeohypotodus rutoti - 1x Cretalamna appendiculata - 5x Isurolamna inflata - 4x Ginglymostoma sp. and Nebrius sp. - 23x Squatina prima - 19x Megasqualus orpiensis and Squalus crenatidens - 4x Premontria sp. - 17x Palaeogaleus vincenti - 17x Scyliorhinus gilberti - 13x Triakis wardi - 7x Physogaleus secundus - 50+ Pachygaleus lefevrei - 15x Galeorhinus ypresiensis - 5x Rhizoprionodon sp. - 32x Abdounia beaugei - 100+ Abdounia minutissima - 100+ Unidentified sp. - 4x Shark vertebra - 1x Ray Material Ray plate bars of various sp. - 100+ including one partial plate Ray teeth of various sp - 100+ Dermal denticles - 21x Stingray barb - 1x Fish Material Fish teeth of various species (including cutlass, barracuda, drum, others) - 100+ Various fish bones - 50+ Anoxypristis sp. - 1x Striatolamia macrota Anomotodon novus & Anomotodon sheppeyensis
  20. Ray plate

    From the album Fossil Collection

  21. H, The family and I spent a lovely week at Walton on the Naze in Essex, UK. As it was the Easter break the site was very busy with collectors young and old, but we still managed to find some interesting pieces. The site itself is London Clay (c53my) with a junction bed above from which whale bone and Megalodon teeth can be found. Above this is the distinctive Red Crag (c.2my). Lastly are glacial deposits and later from which Neolithic and Roman finds have been found over the years. The site is rapidly eroding at a rate of about a metre a year however there are daily land slips and falls so whether that rate is accelerating its hard to say. Most of the finds are in the shingle and with my eyes I had to adopt the 'hands and knees crawl' technique to see anything other than a blur of shapes. All of the finds below (with the exception of the potential neolithic finds) are from the London Clay sediments. The Site: We found a lot of striatolamia shark teeth. Its possible there are other species within this, however we haven't had time to have a detailed look at each tooth yet: Two nice Otodus shark teeth were found by my wife: A pair of what we believe are well worn ray dentition plates. They were hard to photograph so apologies for the lack of clarity: On a previous trip a few weeks ago we also found this. Both turtle and bird bone have been found on this site. Could this be either?: I've included a fossilised twig and a seed that I picked up. The beach is littered with these and tend to be ignored by the fossil hunters as they are so common. I like them: Lastly I've included two interesting finds. The ball is from Walton and the 'spear point' was from Dovercourt just up the coast. In an archaeological context these might be exciting finds - the ball is similar to others that have been described as hammer stones, gaming pieces or sling shots. The 'spear point' shows signs of rework along both edges. Out of context, within the beach shingle, they are just interesting stones but I thought I'd share them anyway: Any comments would be appreciated. Happy Hunting! Carl
  22. Shark Tooth Hill Micros

    First off, I want to thank Doren for sending me a small flat rate box full of STH matrix for me to try sifting through. I still have quite a bit of fine matrix to sort through but already I've managed to find hundreds of specimens. I've found quite a few Carcharhinus, Cetorhinus, Galeorhinus, Squalus, and tons of ray teeth. When I'm finished with all the matrix, I think I'll write a follow-up post with all the nice specimens I found. I'm having a little trouble identifying various species of rays - maybe someone has a literature suggestion to help me get familiar with different tooth characteristics? From what I can tell from other posts, the features that differentiate some ray species are quite subtle and to my untrained eye, very difficult to distinguish. I wouldn't mind some ID help with these teeth in particular. Scale to the right is in mm. If you could also comment on how common/uncommon these species are and what position they are in the jaw that would be immensely helpful as well. Also, maybe someone wouldn't mind making a list of the species found at STH and rank how common they are? Also, does anyone have suggestions for removing the last bit of silt/sand from the crevices in the teeth? I've tried water and gently stirring but that does not have much of an effect. Thanks for your help!
  23. Cretaceous Ray

    A beautiful tooth of this species from this site. Most are extremely worn and with missing or broken roots.
  24. Cretaceous Guitarfish

    This tooth, "pseudohypolophus" has yet to be assigned to a family. It is believed to be an extinct Rajiforme, specifically a guitarfish. Tooth crowns are very common in Black Creek sands, but are very rarely found with the roots.
  25. Ray Tooth

    This somewhat common ray tooth is always a joy to find. Most have some type of root wear or damage, so this one is a great specimen.
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