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Found 47 results

  1. Elasmosaurus Tooth Repair

    I received an awesome set of Moroccan matrices from @caldigger (thanks again!) that included a cracked elasmosaurus tooth. I didn't consolidate the tooth before prepping, as the matrix surrounding the tooth was far harder than the rest of the block, leading me to believe it had been sufficiently consolidated. It split at the crack whole handling it before prep work even begun, so I continued with the rest of the tooth and got the rest out pretty cleanly. The fossil isn't valuable, so I'm not too worried about perfection! Its all part of the learning experience for me. My question is about the correct order to go about repairing this tooth. When you line up the pieces, there is still a small hole from a missing section, and I suppose filling it with the matrix and then adding a layer of Paraloid dilute would be the best way to go? So here is my (tentative) plan of repair: Consolidate the pieces in the dilute Super glue the bits back together as cleanly as possible Fill in the cracks with wet matrix (?) Let it dry, then gently coat again with the dilute solution Would exposing it to the dilute twice be overkill? And I know acetone tends to dissolve super glue, but I assume the glue would hold if it's inside the tooth and the second coat of Paraloid goes on just the outer layer after it has all dried? Hopefully I explained my intentions well, and I'm looking for ideas as to what would be the best order to attempt these steps in or otherwise a preferable method (if there is one) of repair!
  2. I saw this item for sale which is of interest. Dercetis sp from Lebanon - Cretaceous. Contacted the seller who informed me that the crack is a repair, not a composite. Thoughts?
  3. I'm a fairly novice preparator and I was wondering if some of you more experienced folks could help me out a bit. I am working on a dipleura that unfortunately broke apart upon extraction. Some fragments of the pygidium were lost. I have the imprint and was considering casting the missing parts in plaster or something ideally reversible. My goal is to turn this fossil into a nice display piece. There are also some large voids in the matrix I would like to fill in. I've never done anything of this sort to a fossil before and I was hoping for some guidance on materials, techniques, etc. I have attached a couple of photos of the areas I would like to repair.
  4. Not the best greenops ever

    About a month ago I went to Penn with two fossil buddies and they both found prone greenops. Sadly I did not find one. However both of these greenops were split between the positive and negative and probably were missing some skin as the material was quite flaky. For one of my friends this was his first ever find of a prone greenops. Prone greenops that are nicely laid out are a very rare find in the Windom shale. Most of the ones I have found from there or others that I have prepped for people are fully, partially enrolled or distorted. So to my fossil buddy this was a bit of a special find. We wrapped up the two pieces in tin foil in the field and I agreed to take it with me and prep it for him. Well zoom ahead a month in time and I am going out with him last week to collect and he asks how is his greenops coming, whereby I realize that I have not only not started it ,but in my senility had forgotten I had it and had no clue where it was. Well when I got home it turns out that I had never unpacked the bucket of fossils from that trip and low and behold his fossil was packed just as we had left it. A careful look at both parts under the scope confirmed my opinion that the bug was in pretty rough shape , but a prone greenops, not to mention perhaps his first ever prone warranted we attempt to bring it back to life. Unfortunately I did not take any pics until a ways into the prep but here is what I did to start. 1. Washed the mud off both plates scrubbing with a tooth brush 2. Squared up what would become the fossil plate with the diamond gas saw 3. Cut out as small as possible a square from the top piece of the matrix that contained the top part of the greenops using my 7 inch tile saw with diamond blade 4. On a belt sander using aluminum oxide 120 grit thinned the top piece as much as safely possible to help minimize my prep time later. 5. Using super thin cyanoacrylate glue reattached the top portion to the main slab clamping tightly with a c-clamp. Asusual all prep was done under a zoom scope at 10x to 20x magnification using a Comco abrasion unit and in this case a German Pferd MST 31 scribe exclusively.. Not a lot of scribing was done other than to outline the bug as the skin was not in great shape. Abrasion was pretty much done with a .18 and .10 nozzle using 40 micron previously used dolomite at 30 PSI. Here is the bug after about an our of prepping . I have outlined in red where you can still see the outline of the section that was glued down. A lot of people do not realize that many of the fantastic trilobites you see on the market have actually been glued back together because the splits are often through the bug. I once did a Moroccan trilobite that was in 7 pieces when I received it Here is the bug after another 40 minutes Took some pictures of the prep but frankly they ended up too blurry to use so here is the prep after abrasion is complete and after I have repaired a lot of the parts that broke of in the split. I tend to use a white repair material and always take a picture to let the owner know what has been repaired Here is the bug after coloration applied . The repairs were allowed to cure overnight before coloration and a bit of extra carving to clean up spots.Just waiting for me to do a final cleanup tomorrow after everything has cured a bit more. A long way from being the worlds most pristine or perfect bug but I am relatively pleased that we were able to breath some new life into an ailing bug. Totally prep time about 3 1/2 hours over 4 days. I suspect the owner will be pleased with the result. I have seen people toss bugs in the field that were in this type of shape. For those of you who just need to know the bug is 27mm x 18 mm A slightly different view
  5. I purchased a unsightly Franken-Basilosaurus tooth a few weeks ago for pretty cheap. Seeing as though i don't have $400-700+ to spend on a nice basilosaurus tooth i saw potential and a fun project in this cheap ugly duckling. Yes, it's Moroccan. It came with the typical glue/sand mix covering it, filling all cracks, voids and roughing out transitions of deceptive franken composites. How it came: Ok, first things first. Clean it. I used acetone, a razor, a needle, a tooth brush and my engraver. Hours of delicate work later i finally see what i'm working with. After cleaning: Yeesh, this might be more work than i thought...... And someone composited a incisor or canine tooth tip on the top of my premolar!! Bwahahaha!! Ok, composites need to go. Bye, bye Next i noticed this was not lined up correctly when it was glued back together. So i grab my trusty dremel tool and proceed to carefully saw this baby in half. Then i removed most of the epoxy/sand glue from each side. Continued.........
  6. Ugh....

    So I struck the deal of a lifetime. A heliobatis radians for $88.00. But of course I open the box annnnnnd it's broken.
  7. I bought this tooth from a fossil dealer in Utah 2 years ago. I then somehow after that time noticed a strange mark on the bottom of the tooth where it attaches to the root and that there’s a sand like line going across the middle of the tooth. Could this be repair or fabricated teeth I’m seeing?
  8. Mammal tooth repair

    So I found a cool mammal tooth in some matrix. As I was walking over to my computer to research the ID for the tooth I dropped it and it broke into 4 pieces fortunately I can fit the pieces back together, but one piece is just a sliver. What kind of glue should i use I use to fix this?
  9. Solnhofen Fossil Repair

    Hi All, I have been reading through this chat about prep. I wanted to ask what would be best to glue a solnhofen fossil back together? I know that I have seen some fossils from there glued with a light brownish material that does not look like normal super glue. Also got any ideas about how to fill the missing matrix to make it a rectangular slab again? Would this be best with Apoxie Sculpt? I am looking for something that won't eat the limestone (acid-free). Looking forward to your suggestions. Kind regards Rod
  10. Removing Glue Residue

    Just curious what the trick is to removing that white residue that happens with super glue sometimes when it seeps out of the cracks when two pieces are glued and pressed together. I have a couple of hadrosaur processes that have been previously glued that I would like to clean up. I’ve seen people use acetone, but I’m not just going to guess that is okay to do. There’s no coloring or filler done on the specimens. So that’s not a concern. Any help would be much appreciated. Sincerely, J
  11. Repairing Fossils In Shale

    Recently, I have been out fossil hunting more often than usual, and many of them have since been damaged. Some were broken during transportation, and others were broken as I excavated them. The fossils are all from the black Billings Shale, which fractures easily. Is there any way that I can repair them without leaving any obvious markings?
  12. I've been collecting fossils for a while now and it finally happened, I broke one of my finds. Repair and restoration is a part of paleontology that I have no experience and could use some help! What products do you guys recommend?
  13. Can across this one recently on our favorite auction site, a torvosaurus tooth from colorado. Though with no intention of buying especially at the high price tag it is at I have my suspicions, the seller claims it its 100% no repairs or restoration. Looking at the pictures I highly doubt it as it looks extremely repaired to me and some of it especially in the picture zooming into the tip reminds me of the little air holes found in fake cast trilobite. Idk how much is repaired or even if the whole specimen is fake, I'd be interested to hear what you guys think. Definitely a gigantic red flag to me.
  14. I am definitely an amateur when it comes to collecting and need some advice: I recently purchased my first 'larger' Spinosaurus tooth from a small gem/fossil shop in Seattle. The owner told me that it had no repairs or restorations, and that it of course came from Morocco. I tested the tooth under a UV flashlight and there were no anomalies, but I just wanted some more experienced opinions. The enamel looks good- no apparent cracks or suspicious color variations, root still has some of the matrix on it, but the tip seems a little suspicious to me... maybe I'm just being paranoid, but I have read so much about fake fossils and just want to be sure! Let me know what you guys think- Thanks!
  15. Hi guys, I'm a pretty experienced shark tooth collector. But I'm still a little paranoid when it comes to identifying repair/restoration, since I have seen a couple of exceptional restorations that would be very difficult for even a seasoned collector to identify. This is especially the case for restorations to the root; I think I can almost always tell restorations to the serrations and enamel. Does anyone have tips for identifying root restorations? Some people suggest looking at it under a black light, which I will of course do, but for root restos this doesn't always seem to be effective. This question comes up since I recently bought a very large Moroccan otodus (pic attached). I got it from a seller I trust not to knowingly misrepresent anything, but given the price I want to be very confident. Thank you.
  16. Hello all, I recently received some megalodon teeth from Puerto Rico, the other one is ok but this one was found in fragments and held together by tape. I am wondering what will be a good way to repair the fragments for now, would super glue be ok to use or is there something else I should use? Since its from a rare locality I want to stabilize it as best as I can before I decide or not to fully repair it.
  17. Repairing: fish and hyena jaw

    Hi all, These two have been sitting on my desk for some time, as I kept on forgetting to ask this. Now I finally remembered. I once made a trade with a fossil-lover in Singapore, but unfortunately the fossils arrived broken, having not survived the trip. The two broken fossils I got were: a partial Lycoptera davidi, and a small jaw piece of a hyena. I didn't dare take out the fossils of the bag yet, as I was scared I would lose some of the broken off pieces and damage the fossils even more. Here they are: The damage on the Lycoptera isn't very severe; only a big block of matrix got loose (the fossil itself is still intact). But the damage on the hyena jaw is very bad: the big tooth split in two, and many other crumbs here and there. Here is what the jaw looked like before: I was wondering: is there a way to repair the fossils? As in stick them back into one nice piece? I can buy necessary material if it is cheap. Note that this would be my first fossil repair, and I have no experience whatsoever in the subject. Thanks in advance for your help, Max
  18. Paleo Aro Repair

    One of my buddies I prep with has an old paleo aro tool that's ceased to function. Everything on the front end seems to be good, seal is in good condition, spring is good. Opened up the back end- the bronze shut off valve is in good condition, but is there supposed to be a spring there? I've tried both orientations of the shut off valve, and when I connect it to air pressure and turn in on it'll click once and then cease functioning. Asked him a few questions, he says he used some gun oil on it but there was no odd gunk. Any thoughts?
  19. Rhino Jaw Repair

    Next prep job is a major repair. This poor jaw discovered what happens when potential energy is converted to kinetic energy! It needs some serious oral work. I'm using PVA adhesive where possible and Paleobond where I have to. Most of the bone is very porous so the PVA will hold well once set (it takes several hours). Here's the jaw after an hour of consolidation and piecing back together. Later today, or tomorrow, I'll continue the gluing process. Originally, this jaw was put together with something like Gorilla Glue and it's all over the place in one side. Once I have it back together, I'll scribe off the glue and do some restoration on the cracks.
  20. All advice or pointers are welcome. I repaired these three teeth today.
  21. newest megalodon repair

    Hello all! This is my latest megalodon repair:
  22. Hi everyone, Here are multiple repairs I just made to megalodon teeth. For some of them I forgot to take before pictures, The blue tooth has a completely reconstructed left side of the root, and a chunk of the blade and enamel are repaired.
  23. Hello all! This is my newest attempt at restoring a megalodon tooth. I got this tooth as an absolute bargain on ebay for $5.50. PM if you are looking to sell/give away any teeth like this. it is over 5 inches!
  24. My second megalodon repair

    Hi all! This is my second attempt at repairing a megalodon tooth. This one had sever damage to both sides of the root as well as to the blade of the tooth. Overall I am pleased with the repair, except for the rough patches on the left side of the blade. If anyone is looking to get rid of any teeth that are broken like this one, don't hesitate to send me a PM because I am always looking to get more teeth to work with. Enjoy! I am always open to any advice anyone can offer on how to make more authentic looking teeth. I am in the wilds of Maine, so it would take to long to post all of the pictures of it now. I will do so later. Here are just the before and after of the front.
  25. I'm pretty new to buying fossils, and I noticed some nice looking trilobites and other stuff from this same seller. I can't tell if it's been painted or repaired or anything. Has it? It looks a little shiny. Not sure why... Thanks, Scott
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